The Cambridge History of China: Volume 12, Republican China, 1912-1949

Portada
John K. Fairbank, Denis C. Twitchett
Cambridge University Press, 30 sep. 1983 - 1022 páginas
This is the first of two volumes of this authoritative Cambridge history which review the Republican period, between the demise of imperial China and the establishment of the People's Republic. These years from 1912 to 1949 were marked by civil war, revolution and invasion; but also by change and growth in the economic, social, intellectual and cultural spheres. The chapters examine economic trends in the period and the rise of the new middle class. Intellectual trends are surveyed to show the changes in traditional Chinese values and the foreign influences which played a major role in Republican China. Although it is written by specialists, the goals and approach of this Cambridge history are to explain and discuss republican China for an audience which will include scholars, students and general readers who do not have special knowledge of Chinese history. It will be useful both as narrative history and as a reference source on the history and politics of China.
 

Comentarios de usuarios - Escribir una reseña

LibraryThing Review

Reseña de usuario  - ccjolliffe - LibraryThing

It would take a deeper dome than mine to dare to review a Cambridge history. These sets are generally regarded as the apotheosis of historical scholarship. I'm just happy to have one! Leer reseña completa

Índice

Maritime
1
Economic trends 191249
28
Provinces of China under the Republic
30
Economic trends 191249
32
Major crop areas
65
Railways as of 1949
92
The foreign presence in China
128
Foreign territory in China about 1920
130
from
322
Social utopia and the background of the May Fourth movement
374
the quest
451
The Chinese Communist Movement
505
The Chinese bourgeoisie 191157
513
from
527
Kwangtung and Kwangsi in the early 1920
554
The Northern Expedition 192628
580

Treaty ports Shanghai ca 1915
134
Treaty ports Tientsin ca 1915
138
Wuhan cities ca 1915
140
Politics in the aftermath
208
politics
284
Distribution of warlord cliques in 1920
298
Distribution of warlord cliques in 1922
299
Distribution of warlord cliques in 1924
300
Distribution of warlord cliques in 1926
301
Hunan and Kiangsi during the Northern Expedition
582
Hupei
584
The Lower Yangtze region 615
630
North China about 1928
703
The Chinese bourgeoisie 191137
721
Bibliographical essays
827
Bibliography
859
GlossaryIndex
927
Página de créditos

Otras ediciones - Ver todo

Términos y frases comunes

Sobre el autor (1983)

Born in South Dakota, John King Fairbank attended local public schools for his early education. From there he went on first to Exeter, then the University of Wisconsin, and ultimately to Harvard, from which he received his B.A. degree summa cum laude in 1929. That year he traveled to Britain as a Rhodes Scholar. In 1932 he went to China as a teacher and after extensive travel there received his Ph.D. from Oxford University in 1936. Between 1941 and 1946, he was in government service---as a member of the Office of Strategic Services, as special assistant to the U.S. ambassador to China, and finally as director of the U.S. Information Service in China. Excepting those years, beginning in 1936, Fairbank spent his entire career at Harvard University, where he served in many positions, including Francis Lee Higginson Professor of History and director of Harvard's East Asian Research Center. Fairbank, who came to be considered one of the world's foremost authorities on modern Chinese history and Asian-West relations, was committed to reestablishing diplomatic and cultural relations with China. He was also committed to the idea that Americans had to become more conversant with Asian cultures and languages. In his leadership positions at Harvard and as president of the Association for Asian Studies and the American Historical Association, he sought to broaden the bases of expertise about Asia. At the same time, he wrote fluidly and accessibly, concentrating his work on the nineteenth century and emphasizing the relationship between China and the West. At the same time, his writings placed twentieth-century China within the context of a changed and changing global order. It was precisely this understanding that led him to emphasize the reestablishment of American links with China. More than anyone else, Fairbank helped create the modern fields of Chinese and Asian studies in America. His influence on American understanding of China and Asia has been profound.

Información bibliográfica