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" The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs... "
The Theological Works of Thomas Paine: To which are Added the Profession of ... - Página 314
de Thomas Paine - 1832 - 384 páginas
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The Quarterly Review, Volumen 119

1866 - 604 páginas
...whatever be its * ' Lectures,' lit Series, p. 139. antiquity, antiquity, is of a wonderful structure ; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar,...
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The European and Asiatic Races: Observations on the Paper Read ..., Volumen 11

Dadabhai Naoroji - 1866 - 58 páginas
...regard to the Sanscrit language, he says, whatever be its antiquity, it is of wonderful structure, more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either. § With all the above opinions of Sir W. Jones Dr. T. Goldstucker concurs. Horace Wilson thinks it...
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The Conquerors, Warriors, and Statesmen of India: An Historical Narrative of ...

Sir Edward Robert Sullivan - 1866 - 558 páginas
...beauty of the Sanscrit : — Sir William Jones describes it as " a language of wonderful structure ; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either." Professor Wilson says that " the music of Sanscrit composition must ever be inadequately represented...
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The History of India: The Hindú and Mahometan Periods

Mountstuart Elphinstone - 1866 - 1156 páginas
...ancient and Sanscrit. modem nations entitles his opinion to respect, to be " of a wonderful structure ; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either."1 The language so highly commended seems always to have received the attention it deserved....
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The Quarterly Review, Volumen 119

1866 - 582 páginas
...language, whatever be its * ' Lectures,' 1st Series, p. 139. antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitelv refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots...
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English Writers. V.1, Pts. 1-2; 2, Pt.1, Volumen 1

Henry Morley - 1867 - 456 páginas
...Sanskrit appeared as a mine yielding only the purest virgin gold. The Sanskrit language, he said, was " more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either." But later philologists, who hold that complexity and redundance are but signs of imperfection, think...
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The Homilist; or, The pulpit for the people, conducted by D ..., Volumen 17

David Thomas - 1867 - 764 páginas
...at all likely, indeed, that a language written, unlike most aucient tongues, from left to right, " more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either," should have sprung up in India in the very infancy of letters. Long, very long, before we knew anything...
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The Homilist, Volumen 9

1867 - 380 páginas
...at all likely, indeed, that a language written, unlike most ancient tongues, from left to right, " more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either," should have sprung up in India in the very infancy of letters. Long, very long, before we knew anything...
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The Bibliotheca Sacra, Volumen 24

1867 - 824 páginas
...following words : " The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure, more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs, and in the forms of grammar...
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Shinar, the Scripture record of the confusion of language and the dispersion ...

Dominick M'Causland - 1867 - 66 páginas
...introduction of it to the notice of the Asiatic Society in 1782, describes it as of a wonderful structure, ' more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than ca either.' When this ancient language came in view, and was submitted to the critical examination...
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