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Libros Libros 121 a 124 de 124 sobre I do not strain at the position, — It is familiar, — but at the author's drift...
" I do not strain at the position, — It is familiar, — but at the author's drift : Who, in his circumstance, expressly proves, That no man is the lord of any thing, (Though in and of him there be much consisting, ) Till he communicate his parts to others... "
The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text of the corrected copy ... - Página 343
de William Shakespeare - 1805
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Shakespeare

George Ian Duthie - 1951 - 206 páginas
...shining upon others Heat them and they retort that heat again To the first giver. (Ill, iii, 98-102) no man is the lord of any thing, Though in and of...consisting, Till he communicate his parts to others. He is assailing Achilles as excessively individualistic. (And we may remember again that at the end...
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Shakespearian Comedy

Henry Buckley Charlton - 2004 - 303 páginas
...No man is the lord of anything Though in and of him there be much consisting, Till he communicates his parts to others; Nor doth he of himself know them...aught Till he behold them form'd in the applause Where they're extended; who, like an arch, reverberates The voice again, or, like a gate of steel Fronting...
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Opportunity: Optimizing Life's Chances

Donald Morris - 2006 - 461 páginas
...[author's] position — It is familiar — but at the author's drift: That no man is the lord of anything. Though in and of him there be much consisting, Till...aught Till he behold them form'd in the applause Where they're extended."50 Ulysses's point is two pronged. First, he is familiar with the traditional idea...
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Before Intimacy: Asocial Sexuality in Early Modern England

Daniel Juan Gil - 2006 - 187 páginas
...others— what the play terms "fame." In act 3 Ulysses asserts that "no man is the lord of anything, / Though in and of him there be much consisting, / Till...aught, / Till he behold them form'd in the applause" of others (3.3.116—20). It is precisely this function of praising him, of applauding him, that Achilles...
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