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Libros Libros 101 a 104 de 104 sobre Come then, pure hands, and bear the head That sleeps or wears the mask of sleep,...
" Come then, pure hands, and bear the head That sleeps or wears the mask of sleep, And come, whatever loves to weep, And hear the ritual of the dead. Ah yet, ev'n yet, if this might be, I, falling on his faithful heart, Would breathing thro... "
New Englander and Yale Review - Página 604
editado por - 1850
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Faith and Doubt: Religion and Secularization in Literature from Wordsworth ...

R. L. Brett - 1997 - 261 páginas
...that Hallam's body was buried in the church and not the churchyard at Clevedon, he wrote the lines: 'Tis well; 'tis something; we may stand Where he in...his ashes may be made The violet of his native land. (XVIII) This was more than a conventional sentiment, for Clevedon was well known for its violets, and...
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Legends and Lore of Texas Wildflowers

Elizabeth Silverthorne - 2003 - 264 páginas
...mossy stone / Half-hidden from the eye!" or Tennyson in "In Memorium" when he asks for his dead friend, "And from his ashes may be made / The violet of his native land." The name pansy comes from the French pensee (thought), as Ophelia indicates when she says, "there's...
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Shakespeare and the Victorians: Arden Critical Companions

Adrian Poole - 2004 - 296 páginas
...prayer for his sister, that 'from her fair and unpolluted flesh / May violets spring' (5.1.237-8). 'Tis well: 'tis something: we may stand Where he in...his ashes may be made The violet of his native land, (Xvin. 1-4) How much more decorous than the shameful travesty at Ophelia's grave is the invocation:...
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Elegy for an Age: The Presence of the Past in Victorian Literature

John D. Rosenberg - 2005 - 300 páginas
...mourning. Their slow, muted cadence suggest a second burial of Hallam reminiscent of the first, long ago: 'Tis well; 'tis something; we may stand Where he in English earth is laid. . . (18. 1-2) Our sense of an ending is confirmed by manuscript evidence suggesting that Tennyson originally...
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