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" WE all of us complain of the Shortness of Time, saith Seneca, and yet have much more than we know what to do with. Our Lives, says he, are spent either in doing nothing at all, or in doing nothing to the purpose, or in doing nothing that we ought to do:... "
An American Selection of Lessons in Reading and Speaking: Calculated to ... - Página 190
de Noah Webster - 1804 - 225 páginas
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Laconics: Or, The Best Words of the Best Authors

Laconics - 1829
...of the shortness of time, and yet have much more than we know what to do with. Our lives are spent either in doing nothing at all, or in doing nothing to the purpose, or in doing nothing that we ought to do; we are always complaining our days are few, and acting...
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The Monthly Repository, and Library of Entertaining Knowledge, Volumen 1

1831
...to do with. Our lives are either spent in doing nothing at all, or in doing nothing to the purpose, or in doing nothing that we ought to do. We are always complaining that pur days are few, and acting as though there would be It was a memorable practice of Vespasian,...
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The Saturday Magazine, Volumen 2

1833
...to do with. Our lives are cither spent in doing nothing at all. or in doing nothing to the purpose, or in doing nothing that we ought to do. We are always complaining that our days are few, and acting as though there would be no end of them. THE PRODIGAL SON. No words...
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Analysis of the Principles of Rhetorical Delivery as Applied in Reading and ...

Ebenezer Porter - 1833 - 404 páginas
...make up an estate, then to arrive at honors, then to retire." " Our lives, (says Seneca,) are spent either in doing nothing at all, or in doing nothing to the purpose, or in doing nothing that wa ought to do. FALLING INFLECTION. The general principle suggested...
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The Rhetorical Reader: Consisting of Instructions for Regulating the Voice ...

Ebenezer Porter - 1833 - 304 páginas
...make up an estate, then to arrive at honors, then to retire." " Our lives, (says Seneca,) are spent either in doing nothing at all, or in doing nothing to the purpose, or in doing nothing that we oilght to do." Falling Inflection. So instinctively does bold...
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Progressive Exercises in Rhetorical Reading: Particularly Designed to ...

Richard Green Parker - 1835 - 144 páginas
...mysterious source he bent in humble, though blind adoration. 609. Our lives, says Seneca, are spent either in doing nothing at all, or in doing nothing to the purpose, or in doing nothing that we ought to do. 610. It was necessary for the world that arts should...
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The Spectator: With Notes and a General Index, Volúmenes 1-2

1836
...time, saith Seneca, and yet have much more than we know what to do with. Our lives, says he, arc spent the eyes of posterity. For this reason they often represen purpose, or in doing nothing that we ought to do. We are always complaining our days are few, and acting...
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The Works of Joseph Addison: The Spectator, no. 1-314

Joseph Addison - 1837
...time, saith Seneca, and yet have much more than we know what to do with. Our lives, says he, are spent either in doing nothing at all, or in doing nothing to the purpose, or in doing nothing that we ought to do. We are always complaining our days are few, and acting...
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The Rhetorical Reader: Consisting of Instructions for Regulating the Voice ...

Ebenezer Porter - 1838 - 304 páginas
...make up an estate, then to arrive at honors, then to retire." " Our lives, (says Seneca,) are spent either in doing nothing at all, or in doing nothing to the purpose, or in doing nothing that we ought to do." Falling Inflection. So instinctively does bold and...
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THE PENNY SUNDAY READER

J. G. F - 1839
...know what to do with. Our lives are spent either in doing nothing, or in doing nothing to the purpose, or in doing nothing that we ought to do; we are always complaining that our days are few, and acting as though there would be no end of them.—Seneca. How little reliance...
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