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C T
c ο Ν Τ Ε

N T S

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D E N H A M'S POE M S.

20

COOPER's Hill

Page 7 The Destruction of Troy, an Essay on the second

Book of Virgil's Æneis
On the Earl of Strafford's Trial and Death

39 On my Lord Crofts and my Journey into Poland, from

whence we brought 10,000l. for his Majesty, by the

Decimation of his Scottish Subjects there .40 On Mr. Thomas Killigrew's Return from his Em

bally from Venice, and Mr. William Murray's from Scotland

43 To Sir John Mennis, being invited from Calais to Bologne to eat a Pig

44 Natura Naturata Sarpedon's Speech to Glaucus in the 12th of Homer 47 Epigram from Martial

49 Friendship and single Life, against Love and Marriage

50 On Mr. Abraham Cowley's Death and Burial amongst

the Ancient Poets A Speech against Peace at the Close Committee To the five Members of the Honourable House of Commons. The humble Petition of the Poets

62 A Western Wonder

64 A Se

46

54! 58

TO THE HON. EDWARD HOWARD,

Ο Ν

THE BRITISH PRINCES.

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WH

THAT mighty gale hath rais'd a flight so strong

So high above all vulgar eyes ? so long?
One single rapture scarce itself confines
Within the limits of four thousand lines.a.
And
yet I hope to see this noble heat

5
Continue, till it makes the piece compleat,
That to the latter age it may descend,
And to the end of time its beams extend,
When poefy joins profit with delight,
Her images should be most exquisite,
Since man to that perfection cannot rise,
of always virtuous, fortunate, and wile;
Therefore the patterns man should imitate
Above the life our masters should create,
Herein, if we consult with Greece and Rome, 15
Greece (as in war) by Rome was overcome;
Though mighty raptures we in Homer find,
Yet, like himself, his characters were blind
Virgil's sublimed eyes not only gaz'd,
But his sublimed thoughts to Heaven were rais'd.
Who reads the honours which he paid the gods,
Would think he had beheld their blest abodes;
DENHAM
* K &

And

20

. And, that his hero might accomplish'd be, From divine blood he draws his pedigree. From that great judge your judgment takes its law, as And by the best original does draw Bonduca's honour, with those heroes Time Had in oblivion wrapt, his faucy crime; To them and to your nation you are just, In raising up their glories from the dust; And to Old England you that right have done, To fhew, no story nobler than her own.

3!

EL EGY ON THE DEATH

O. F

HENRY LORD HASTINGS.

1650.
R
EADER; preserve thy peace; those busy eyes-
Will

weep at their own fad discoveries;
When every line they add improves thy loss,
Till, having view'd the whole, they sum a cross;
Such as derides thy passions' best relief,
And scorns, the succours of thy easy grief,
Yet, left thy ignorance betray thy name
Of man and pious, read and mourn : the fame
Of an exemption, from just fense, doth thew
Irrational, beyond excess of woe.
Since reason, then, can privilege a tear,
Mansood, uncensur'd, pay that tribute here,

Upon

35

ON THE DEATH OF LORD HASTINGS. 145
Upon this noble urn. Here, here remains
Duft far more precious than in India's veins:
Within these cold embraces, ravilh’d, lies
That which compleats the age's tyrannies :
Who weak to fuch another ill appear,
For what destroys our hope, fecures our fear.
What fin unexpiated, in this land
Of

groans, hath guided fo fevere a hand?
The late great victim * that your altars knew,
Ye angry gods, might have excus'd this new
Oblation, and have spar'd one lofty light
Of virtue, to inform our steps aright;
By whose example good, condemned we
Might have run on to kinder destiny.
But, as the leader of the herd fell first
A sacrifice, to quench the raging thift
Of inflam'd vengeance for past crimes; fo none
But this white-farted youngling could atone,

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By his untimely fate, that impious- smoke,
That sullied earth, and did Heaven's pity choak.
Let it suffice for us, that we have lost
In him, more than the widow'd world can boal
In any lump of her remaining clay.

35 Fair as the grey-ey'd morn he was; the day, Youthful, and climbing upwards still, imparts No haste like that of his increafing parts; Like the meridian beam, his virtue's light Was seen, as full of comfort, and as bright.

* King Charles the First,

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