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thodist parson merrily says, that the pa." wrote and published an appendix to a rith parlons are his very good friends, catalogue of all graduates in divinity, who beat up for recruits for him, and law, and physick, published by Richard talks of sending them a letter of thanks. Peers, fup. hed. of arts and physick, from This may serve to thew the impru- July 14, 1688, where Peers left off, 10 dence of meddling in such matters ; Aug. 16, 1690 : but the gentleman who therefore, if we wish well to the Church, communicated the above account says let us talk no more about muzzles, he could never get a light of it. but take Gamaliel's advice, to refrain On further enquiry concerning Fitzfrom these men, and let them alone, Gibbon, I learn that there were two &c. Let our bishops look well to the brothers at Christ-church ; the eldelt, clergy ; let the inferior clergy look di-, lon, created M. A. in 1766; and the ligently to their focks, as they who youngest, John, who regularly promust give account to God; and let our ceeded M. A. in Lent term 1770, have parish churches surpass the conventicles ing been incorporated B. A. from Dube in convenience and accommodation, lin the same term, and was the late and then we shall not have to deplore a Earl of Clare, Chancellor of Ireland. finking cause, nor be under the fad Yours, &c.

Editor, necessity of resorting to such advocates P.S. The above not arriving time as Mr. Olborn, or such measures as enough to be inserted in your last, I the use of ecclesiastical muzzles. beg you will add the following, in A TRUE CHURCHIMAN. consequence of the second letter of

Emeritus Academicus, p. 132. The Mr. URBAN, O.xford, Feb. 24. Graduates referred to in the Bodleian

" A ter, p. 132, that I believed the Doctors of Phyfick in our two Unihistory of the publications of the Ox- versities of Cambridge and Oxford ; ford Graduates to be correct, I had printed in the year 1695." It contains not seen a catalogue earlier than 1727. iheir names and colleges from 1659 to But by the favour of a friend, who is 1694, both inclusive; first in a chronoan avinent collector of Antiquities, logical, and next in an alphabetical particularly relating to this Univerling, order ; in all 31 pages. It is in a colhaving been shewn many lifts (lip- lection of several mechical tracts, and posed to be very scarce copies) prior io was most likely printed in London, ibat period, I beg leave to correct my- and, as it feems by an address to the

I self as well as Emeritus Academicus. reader prefixed, in confeqnence of some The first catalogue was published A. D. dilputes in the College of Physicians. 1689, by Richard Peers, M. A. of Pelhall (John), v. Pearfall, was tranfChrist-church, a licentiate in Med. and posed to Pechell, the name affumed by fup. bed. of Med. who was also said to the fons of the self-created baronet; be the person employed by Dr. Fell to but afterwards omitted, that the page tranllaie A. Wood's History and Anti- might not be encumbered with relequities of the University of Oxford into sences to a family that to often have Latin. There is prefixed to the first cac changed their name, talogue a dedication to Dr. Gilbert Oxford, March 13, 1802. Ironside, warden of Wadham college, and, at the time of the publication of Mr. URBAN, Wahefield, Fot. 18. the catalogue, vice-chancellor of the IN D:33, is an account of the bad

is tained the names of proceeders from ceived by parish apprentices. Biit, is Oct. 10, 1659, to July 14, 1688. The it not the duty of magistrates to look second from July 14, 1088, to July into the state of treatment which they 14, 1695. The third from July 16, receive? A frequent complaint with 1695, to March 23, 1699. The fourth fome masters is, that they are put out from March 23, 1699, 10 March 29, to thein when in a bad fate of health ; but 1705. The fifth from March 29, 1705, might not that be remedied? I think to July 24, 1713. A general catalogue the following plan, is inserted in your was then made, including all from excellent Magazine, might, perhaps, 1659 to October 10, 1726, &c. meet the attention of some worthy ma

A. Wood says, in his Athen. Oxon. gifirates, and let it be carried into full vol. II. (edit. 1721) p. 893, that Mr. effect. Let the magiftrates at their ge. Gerrard Langbaine, fup. bed. of Law, neral quarter felions appoint a surgeon

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have been found, Although Cham- Mr. URBAN,

Feb. 22. bers's Dictionary does not give the re- EING a fincere friend to the Eltaceipl for 'making it, it says, it is re..

, commended as useful in cases of gun- surprised at Mr. Osborn's address to the fhot wounds. In the Domestic Ency. bishops, vol. LXXI. p. 890. The greatest clopædia there is fo different a compo- enemy to our Church could hardly have sition given under the same name, that, used her more barbarously than this unhould my countrymen apply that to natural son. One cannot help thinking gun-shot wounds in mistake, it might that, like the late Gilb. Wakefield, he has have'a worse effect than the bullet. I been lettingoff a Ny cracker against her wish my scribbling may induce ma- under the mask of friendship. Can it ny to send to the publick, through your be thought any proof of his regard to Magazine, receipts they may have by her, thus to expose her to open rethem, that have been proved, and are proach and sectarian ridicale? or, was of real use ; should this be the case, there nothing more substantial to urge you Thall often hear from

against his opponents than untruth Yours, &c.

D. and invective? Surely, Mr. Urban,

we are not come to this pass!, No, Mr. URBAN,

March 1. fir, thank God we can defend our the fluctuation of talie and the have sometimes strolled into different

! increase of wealth in this kingdom, conventicles, and never had occafion than the price given on Saturday last at to stand, except I went in late, and the Mr. Christie's, for Hogarth's celebrated feats were full. Often have I wished series of pictures, intituled, The Rake's to see our parish churches laid out in Progress, by Mr. Soane the architect, the fame way as Whitefield's taberna580 guineas. The father of the late cles. Certainly they put us to fhame; pofleilor paid 22 guineas a-piece, or and yet this is the handle he has un184). 16s. for the fet; and they had luckily taken hold of, and unwisely the good fortune to be preferred from allerts they wish to keep us out of their The fire which destroyed his house at places. I should easier have believed 'Fomhill, 1755, and with it the counter him had he said they endeavoured to fel of The Harlot's Progress. They inerease the number of their adherents. were on the whole inferior to the Mar. Reflect, Mr. Urban, on the mischieriage à lu Mode, purchased a few years vous effects such assertions may proago by Mr. Angerfiein for, I believe, duce. Suppose your hearers (willing to 13841.; hut by no means so much infe- judge for themselves) should go to rior as to julisy such a comparative fome of these feftarian places, obferve want of zeal in the lidding Cognoscenti. their ainple accommodation, see them Yours, &c.

crowded with hearers, and perhaps

find a better preacher than they Mr. URBAN,

March 4. had been taught to expect; what, I COU have given us litis of inus fay, may we expect the result to be? with their incumbents, mansion-houfes party, and a dimitution of ours. with their lords. Why not indulge us Then as to Mr. Ofbor telling a tale awith a litt of coRN-MILLS and their bout what one of their popular preachoccupiers within 20 miles of the capi- ers should say, I am afraid he will only tal ? There can be no more objection induce a counter part not much to to knowing where the belt corn is our advantage.indeed, we had better ground, and the best four fold, than to be quiet. I have lately seen an instance knowing who sells the best meat or on the opposite part, which convinces cloth : and it would furely be a cre- me of the folly of opening our mouths, dit to a miller to be held up with a against them. Our afternoon lecturer good character; a character so opposite has been preaching very pointedly ato that which popular opinion from gainst a Methodist, whofe obnoxious the earliest ages has affixed to this class chapel is within one minutes walk of of men. It is time we should feel the the church. This excited the curiosity blessings of peace we have been fighting of many in the parish to go and hear for, and of a plenty we are fill trug. him, and the upshot of all is that, while gling and panting for.

his chapel is crowded, the church A FRIEND TO THE POOR. grows thinger and thinner. The Me

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thodist parfon merrily says, that the pa. wrote and published an appendix to a rish parlons are his very good friends, catalogne of all graduates in divinity, who beat up for recruits for him, and law, and phylick, published by Richard talks of fending them a letter of thanks. Peers, fup. hed. of arts and physick, from This may serve to thew the impru- July 14, 1688, wbere Peers left off, to dence of meddling in such matters; Aug. 16, 1690: but the gentleman who therefore, if we wish well to the Church, communicated the above account says let us talk no more about muzzles, he could never get a light of it. but take Gamaliel's advice, to refrain On further enquiry concerning Fitzfrom these men, and let them alone, Gibbon, I learn that there were two &c. Let our bishops look well to the brothers at Christ-church; the eldelt, clergy ; let the inferior clergy look di-, lon, created M. A. in 1760; and the ligently to their flocks, as they who youngest, John, who regularly promust give account to God; and 'let our ceeded M. A. in Lent term 1770, have parish churches furpass the conventicles ing been incorporated B. A. from Dubin convenience and accommodation, lin the same term, and was the late and then we shall not have to deplore a Earl of Clare, Chancellor of Ireland. finking cause, nor be under the fad Yours, &c.

Editor, neceflity of resorting to fuch advocates P.S. The above not arriving time as Mr. Olborn, or fuch measures as enough to be inserted in your last, I the use of ecclefiaftical muzzles.. beg you will add the following, in A TRUE CHURCHMAN. consequence of the fecond letter of

Emeritus Academicus, p. 139. The Mr. URBAN, Oxford, Feb. 24. Graduates referred to in the Bodleian WHEN I said in my former let Library is invituled, " A Regifier of the

ter, p. 132, that I believed the Doctors of Phyfick in our two Unihistory of the publications of the Ox. verlities of Cambridge and Oxford ; ford Graduates to be correct, I had printed in the year 1693." It contains not seen a catalogue carlier than 1727. iheir names and colleges from 1659 to But by the favour of a friend, who is 1094, both inclusive ; first in a chronoan oinent collector of Antiquities, logical, and next in an alphabetical particularly relating to this University, order; in all 31 pages. It is in a colhaving been shewn many lifts (liip- lection of several mechcal tracts, and posed to be very scarce copies) prior io was most likely printed in London, ibat period, I beg leave to correct my- and, as it seems by an address to the felf as well as Emeritus Academicus. reader prefixed, in consegnence of some The first catalogue was published A. D. disputes in the College of Physicians. 1689, by Richard Peers, M. A. of Pelhall (John), v. Pearfall, was transChri-church, a licentiate in Med. and posed to Pechell

, the nanie assumed by fup. bed. of Med. who was also said to the fons of the self-created baronet;: be the person employed by Dr. Fell to but afterwards omitted, that the page tranflaie A. Wood's History and Anti- might not be encumbered with relequities of the University of Oxford into rences to a family that to often have Latin. There is prefixed to the first ca. changed their name. talogue a dedication to Dr. Gilbert Oxford; March 13, 1802. · Ironside, warden of Wadham college, and, at the time of the publication of

Mr. URBAN, Wakefield, Feb. 18. the catalogue vice-chancellor of the IN D:33, is an account of the bad

con- treatment which is retained the names of proceeders from ceived by parish apprentices. Biit, is Oct. 10, 1659, to July 14, 1688. The it not the duty of magifirates to look fecond from July 14, 1088, to July into the state of treatment which they 14, 1695. The third from July 16, receive? A frequent complaint with 1695, to March 23, 1699. The fourth tone masters is, that they are put out from March 23, 1699, to March 29, to them when in a bad fate of health ; but 1705. The fifth from March 29, 1705, might not that be remedied? I think to July 24, 1713. A general catalogue the following plan, if inferted in your was then made, including all from excellent Magazine, might, perhaps, 1659 to October 10, 1726, &c. meet the attention of some worthy ma

A. Wood says, in his Athen. Oxon. gilirates, and let it be carried into full vol. II. (edit. 1721) p. 893, that Mr. effect. Let the magiftrates at their ge. Gerrard Langbaine, fup. bed. of Law, neral quarter feflions appoint a furgeon

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"[Mar to examine each, apprentice, when put the sake of all the parjies concerned, out, that he is in a good siate of health; would hope you are impoled, upon by and likewise afier that time once or the current but ill-founded-story of the twice every half year at particular pla- day., I have known ,inftauces whero ces, the which the magistrates should bribes have been offered. under the specify; to see he is well cloathed, mask of charity, when, the party folia used,' sed, &c, by his matter. Let citing a favour offers to pay a fun of the furgeon appointed be one who has money in the name of the bestower to been most in the habits of examining some public clarity, and has been men for the army and navy during the nobly refused. But in the prefent cale late war.

For each examination sup- no concealment is attempted: one pote, for instance, he is allowed by the party demands, another gives the bribe, overseers one shilling for each certificate and a third knowingly iutlers the fiun when they go out; and likewise paid !o be numbered among their benele the like fum for each certificate by the tions--at least I hope and trusi they do master at the yearly and half yearly ex- fo, and that they do not disguite iheir aminations.

disgrace under fome mysterious wamc, Let the surgeon be called the inspec. I shall look with impatience for the tor of these poor children;

and next annual lift of fubfcribers and be. make it worth his while, let him take nefactors to the Philanthropic Society. the adjacent places or parishes in the A Philunthropijl in his own Way. town which he resides. The above plan, if properly attended

Mr. URBAN,

March 3. to, would be of great fervice to these poor destitute orphans; it would hinder to parliament for erecting a bridge fome of their masters from keeping over the Mengi, for facilitating the patthein working all night, so detrimen- sage into Ireland, your readers may tal to their health.

not be displeated with the following The surgeon would report it to the account of that famous (irait. It dioverseers, if he saw any ill usage; and it vides the island of Anglesea from the would be the duty of the overseers to main land of North IV'ales, and is, at call the master to account by laying an the ferry from Caernarvon to Tal y action against hiin for the ill treatment Voel in the island, 2 miles broad, and of his apprentice. The number of about 14. miles long; 10 from Bang poor people who have suffered during glas near Beaumaris to Caernarvon, the late scarcity, have fallen with their and 4 from thence to its entrance at young offspring upon the parishes they Abermenai, the very narrow passage belong to. Does not every feeling heart into the port of Caernarvon, rendered think with horror of the sufferings which dangerous by funds within, and with. have been undergone by fome

poor

At Craigy Ddinas, in Anglesea, parilh apprentices ? Does it not re

it forms a noble curvature ; noi 'far quire that there should be a regulaijon from which is a furious current called adopted, which might be of utility to the Sweily, or Prell Keris, where, by them? Humanity answers me: ves; opposition of rocks and violent wbirlit is highly necessary.

pools during the time when the flood I have just witnessed a scene where or ebb makes strong, are great overthe natier has struck a town apprentice 'falls and violent whirlpools. At lowfo as, alquoft 10 divide the ear from the water the channel for a considerable

head. If fuch scenes as these do not face appears pointed with rocks, black call for regulation, we live in a fad and horrible. At high-water all is fe.agc. A CONSTANT READER.

This is a great obliacle to the

navigation of large reliels, which njust Mr. URBAN,

March 2.

consult the critical season and a good I! F it be a good old maxim not to pilot. The rest of this firait is focure. " do evil that good may come,”

The above particulars are collected what shall we think of the conductors from Mr. Pemant, who is the only of a benevolent Society for taking a

Well tourili that does more than name bribe io pervert the course of humanity, this strait.

TOPOGRAPHUS. and juiiice for their own benefit: I svould fain perfuade myself the anec

Mr. Urban, London, March 5. dote recorded in your Obituary of laft YOUR Review of my "Work has buat month, p. 180, cannot be true; but, for: juft fallen in my hands and the

out.

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cure.

yerç extraordinary affertions there made competent knowledge of the subject, I have much surprised me. These are con- proceed to obferve, that it is evident the fined to three: 1tt, That the person minds of niany of the best friends of the cited for proof of the Abbot's attor- Church, and the country at large, Have ney's having suitable credentials, was been some time labouring to improve the ihe Hundredarius of St. Alban's, as if address of the pulpit. This is manifest that was any concern of mine to en- from the variety of reflections and proquire into. 2d, That I had cited a posals which have issued from the press Rowlciun fiction for a record; whereas, upon the subject, and particularly in the pafiages I have quoted have no re- the Elay on the Eloquence of the Pullation to any such thing, but to au- pit in England, prefixed 10

“ Select thentic documents ; as letters of infti- Sermons and Funeral Orations, from tution, an archiepifcopal visitation, the French of M. Bolliet.” But and things of a kind with which Chat though in another place, and in another terton could have no concern. 3d, character, it has been acknowledged That I had but half quoted my au

“ that this work at the present time is thors; whereas I have made it a rule of the highest importance : that the aualways to give my author once at full thor writes like a matter of bis subject, length at least, and sometimes more. and seems to have felt all the force of Your Reviewer too has observed, with the instructions he has recommended fome airs, I have given the Benedictine to others ;" I have now but too much order the preference. I presume, I am rea on to apprehend that the species of at liberty to tay, upon a subject I have eloquence to which he gives the preparticularly studied, that I ain a much ference will never reach the lower or. better judge what order is entitled to a ders, nor sufficiently imress the great preference than he is able to informin bulk of the people. However, the aqjne. T. D. FOSBROOKE. thor's attempt is deserving of all the

commendation it has met with, for Ilints FOR IMPROVING THE ENERGY

the celebrity it has given to the neg,

lected eloquence of the pulpit; and OF THE PULPIT.

calling forth other exertions, though ένα σαρρησίαν έχωμεν.

inferior in stile and execution. i John, chap. iv, 17. It is evident that this ingenious wriW

HILE the most discerning in ter pays more regard to an impasjioned

the Church and State do not manner of delivery, than to the matter attempt to conceal their apprehensions of pulpit discourses. He feens to fupof a fresh ide of dislipation, from the re- pole "a laient energy of foul," and newal of our intercourse with France ; even innate ideas where they may not a subject not unworthy the attention of exist. With him and Cudworth, waj Mellrs. Wilberforce and Windham may grant that “knowledge is not to only, but of the Legillature at large; be poured into the foul like liquor, every attempt to strengthen the hands but rather to be invited and gently of the Friends of Religion ought to be drawn forth from it.; nor the mind to cherished as a degree of national fpirit much to be filled therewith from vithexerted for its best and most permanent out, like a vefiel, as to be kindled and interett. Such exertions are also cal- awakened, &c.". But still all this fup

culated to repair the dilapidations of poses fome previous infirhon of know, time, and reltore that foundness and ledge, energy, and capacity, which vigour in the body politic, the decay of the author of the eflay has not defined. which has been the fubject of so much He may, in some fenfe, justly lament Segret, ever since the great increase of “that, when Shakspeare was born, Naour riches and commerce have been the ture deliroyed the niould in which his principal means of diminishing our vir- great mind was formed ;" and add tues und our clieem for religion..

his wishes, “ that some superior genius As an acquaintance of twenty years would break the general mould in duration wiih nearly all sorts and con- wbich religious discourses are cast;" disions of religious persuasions, the al, but this alto lavours more of the fpirit ternate experience of the worth and of poetry than piety, and feems alío to also of the want of religion, and some imply that some external mode of preachefforts in its farour, crowned with the ing being introduced would stand in, approbation of dignified superiors, must stead of individual acquisition; that this be allowed to confer some claim to a "new mouldwould answer the pur

poses

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