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water in the pale sunbeam of human reason, but they are very few; and their opinions, without enthusiasm or appeal to the passions, can never gain Woo-oo: indeed, they are persecuted—that, to be sure, will increase anything.

Mr. S. with a cowardly ferocity, exults over the anticipated “death-bed repentance" of the objects of his dislike; and indulges himself in a pleasant “Vision of Judgment,” in prose as well as verse, full of impious impudence. What Mr. S.'s sensatious or ours may be in the awful moment of leaving this state of existence neither he nor we can pretend to decide In common, I presume, with most men of any reflection, I have not waited for a “death-bed ” to repent of many of Lay actions, notwithstanding the “ diabolical pride” which this pitiful renegado in his rancour would impute to those who scorn him. Whether upon the whole the good or evil of my deeds may preponderate is not for me to ascertain; but, as my means and opportunities have been greater, I shall limit my present defence to an assertion (easily proved, if necessary), that I, “in my degree,” have done more real good in any one given year, since I was twenty, than Mr. Southey in the whole course of his shifting and turn-coat existence. There are oil actions to which I can look back with an honest

ride, not to be damped by the calumnies of a hireÉ. . There are others to which I recur with sorrow o repentance; but the only act of my life of

which Mr. Southey can have any real knowledge,

as it was one which brought me in contact with a near connexion of his own, did no dishonor to that connexion nor to me.

I am not ignorant of Mr. Southey's calumnies on a different occasion, knowing them to be such, which he scattered abroad on his return from Switzerland against me and others: they have done him no good in this world, and, if his creed be the right one, they will do less in the next. What his “death-bed ” may be, it is not my province to predicate : let him settle it with his Maker, as I must do with mine. There is something at once ludicrous and blasphemous in this arrogant scribbler of all work sitting down to deal damnation and destruction upon ‘i. fellow-creatures, with Wat Tyler, the Apotheosis of George the Third, and the Elegy on Martin the regicide, all shuffled together in his writing-desk. One of his consolations apears to be a Latin note from the work of a Mr. andor, the author of “Gebir,” whose friendship for Robert Southey will, it seems, “be an honor to him when the ephemeral disputes and epheneral reputations of the day are forgotten.” . I for one neither envy him “the friendship,” nor the glory in reversion which is to accrue from it, like Mr. Thelusson's fortune in the third and fourth generation. This friendship will probably be as memorable as his own epics, which #. I quotod to him ten on twelve years ago in “English Bards”) Porson said “would be remembered when Homer and Virgil are forgotten, and not till then.” For the present. I leave him.

SARDANAPALUS;
A TRAGEDY. -

TO
THE ILLUSTRIO US GO ETHE

A 8TRANGER PRESUMES TO OFFER THE HOMAGE
OF A LITERARY WASSAL TO HIS LIEGE LoRD, THE FIRST of ExISTING warrans
WHO HAS CREATED THE LITERATURE of HIs own country.
AND ILLUSTRATED THAT OF EUROPE.
THE UNWORt HY PRODUCTION WHICH THE AUTHOR VENTUREs to 1NscRIBE to HIM
Is ENtitl, ED
SARDANAPALUS.

PREFACE. In this tragedy it has been my intention to follow - - the account of Diodorus Siculus: reducing it, how. IN publishing the tragedies of Sardanapalus and ever, to such dramatic regularity as 1 best could, the Two Foscari, I have only to repeat that they were and trying to approach the unities. I therefore not composed with the most remote view to the stage. suppose the rebellion to explode and succeed in one On the attempt made by the Managers in a for-day by a sudden conspiracy instead of the long was mer instance, the public opinion has been already of the history. expressed. With regard to my own private feelings, as it scems that they are to stand for nothing, I shall say nothing. For the historical foundation of the compositions - r. in question, the reader is referred to the Notes. *-*. King of Nineveh, and The Author has in one instance attempted to ov- preserve, and in the other to approach the “uni- ARBAces, the Mede, who aspired to the ties; ” conceiving that with any very distant departure from them, there may be poetry, but can be no "-- --> irama. He is aware of the o of this SALEMewes, the King's Brother-in-law. notion in present English literature; but it is not a ALTADA, an Assyrian Officer of the system of his own, being merely an opinion, which, Palace.

DRAMATIS PERSONAE,

w

Throne.
BELEs Es, a Chaldean and Soothsayer.

not very long ago, was the law of literature through- %. out the world, and is still so in the more civilized §: . parts of it. But “Nous avons change tout cela,” i.

and are reaping the advantages of the change. The writer is far from conceiving that any “hing he can Women.—ZARINA, the Queen. adduce by personal precept or example can at all MYRRHA, an Ionian female Slate, and approach his regular, or even irregular predecessors; the Favorite of Sakoasapalus. he is merely giving a reason why he preferred the Women composing the Harem of SARDANAPALUs, more regular formation of a structure however Guards, Attendants, Chaldean Priests, Medes. feeble, to an entire abandonment of all rules what- &c., &c. soever. Where he has failed the failure is in the architect, and not in the art Scene—a Hall in the Royal Palace of Nine reh.

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