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Robin Roole

183
MISCELLANEOUS.

i Petra, the Discovery, of, by
Sailor's Wife, the, or the Triumph
Aborigines of New South Wales 60

Burcinar

140
of Honesty

9
Adventure among the Moun-

Pintea, t. ing lost Capital of
Sailor's Return, the

407
tains
142

50
Son and Heir, the, or the Effects Adventure in 'a Volcanic Dis:

Pira! , !e.

367
of Passion

148
trict
252 Poet's levard, the

286
Soldier and his Wife, the 296 Adventure with an American Prayer at the Mast Head, a 153
Village Story, a

264
Bear

109 Rencontre with a Boa Constrictor 95
After-dinner Pastimes at Glou- Rio Janeiro, Slave Traffic in 251
cester House

334 Robert Burns and Lord Byron 172
Alcoholic Liquors

41
Runaway, the

205
HISTORY.
Arabian Tales and Anecdotes 285

Sabbath Thoughts

47
Beginning of the Fifteenth Cen-
Arctic Regions, Extract from a

Scenes, &c. in Paris
221
Rue St Denis, the

363
tury-Council of Constance

Manuscript Journal in the
70

30
Artist Surprised, the

Boulevard St Denis, the 364
Edward the Third and his French

39

Faubourg St Denis, the 361
Atmosphere
Wars

276
Concluded

319

364

Church of St Bartholemy
Bag of Gold, the
293

315
Banditti, Daring Exploit of ,

Seine and its Bridges, the 365
French Revolution-

Blind Woman, the
78 Tuileries, the

365
State of France
117

Bastile, the

365
National Assembly

British Society, Subdivisions
132
of

333
Palais Royal, the

366
Convention
152

350
Place Louis XV., the

366
Camelopard Hunting
Reign of Terror

166
Canning's (Mr) Opinion of

Plains of Vertus and St Denis 366
Parliamentary Eloquence

334
Ecole de Natation

366
Cawdor Castle

310+
Fontaine-Moliere, the

366
DIGESTS OF BOOKS.
Charitable Israelite, Anecdote

Bastile, Historical Anecdotes
of a

286
connected with the

382
American Ambassador in Lon- Cid of Spain, the

234

397
Gamin, the

398
don, the
333 City of the Desert, the

Agent de Change, the
303

Parisian Student, the
40

398
Kilgour on Health

39 Clothing
Cruelty to Animals

133
Lectures to Young Men on Re-

French Bench and Bar, the 398
Deaf and Dumb, Language of

Flaneur, the, or Lounger

399
ligion, Science, and Litera-
ture

399

Epicier, the
380 the
253

63
Letters from a German Countess 107 Deaf and Dumb, Method of Shark and the Spectacles, the
Lights and Shadows of Scottish Teaching the

266

415

Sheik and his Ass, the
Life
90 Death of Friends, the
268

250

St Jago, Description of
Literary Characteristics of the

Sudden Alterations of Atmo-
Deaths of Little Children 190
316 Discoveries at Nineveh

93
Holy Scriptures

spheric Caloric and Mois-
Dodimus Doolittle

222

ture
Memoirs of Lady Hester Stan-

40
hope

91
413 Dreams
285 Suppers in Stockholm

125
Pictures of Private Life 188 Duncan and Camperdown

Thoughts on Spring
227-

182
Poems by Lord Robertson
236 Eating Salt
285 Thoughts on Winter

31
Trip to the Peninsula

300 | English Dinner Parties 333 Unparalleled Chase
United States' Exploring Expedi-

Errors of the Press
230

86

Value of Affection, the
tion
250 Fermented Liquors

Wellington's (Duke of) Opi-

41
Forget Me Not

334
335

nion of Military Matters
Friendship

116
279

Worth of the Bible, the
Great Teacher, the

174
POETRY

Gipsies on the Lower Danube 108
Habitations

40
Chevy Chase
352 Hours in Hindostan

INSTRUCTIVE AND ENTERTAINING
255

FRAGMENTS.
Come to the House of Mourning 400 Hungarian Habits and Man-
Coming Swallow, the '.
288
108 Absence of Mind

160
Death of a Friend, the
144 | I Kent It
189 After Reflections

320
Dying Boy, the
64 Jewish Ladies in Damascus 108 | American Walves

09
Flight of Time, the
176 Lecch Fishery, the

187 | Anecdote of Frederick the Great 96
Flowers
304 Literary Pursuits
175 Anecdote of Haydn

160
Gather Ripe Fruits, o Deată ! 96 Lithography by Steam Power 126 Anecdote of Charles IV. 207
Grave, the
232 Margaret Lambrun. An Histori- Aversion to Labour

272
Home
160 cal Anecdote

157 Bad Temper
Hymn-God is a Sun
320 Melting Story, a

191 Baths for the People

126
Jerusalem

112 Men who are Diligent in Trifles 79 | Beauty
Light and Shadow
224 Michael Angelo and his Pupils 270 Ben Jonson's Burial-place

2510
Love's Necessity
48 Mont Blanc and Surrounding Books

16
Misanthropic Hours
32 Scenery
175 Burns' Poems

336
Moss Rose, the
384 Mountains

77 Burns

-127
Napoleon and the British Sailor 80 Mozart's Requiem

159 Byron

127
O'Connor's Child; or, the Flower Nelson and the Nile

219 Calumet, the, or Pipe of Peace. 223
of Love Lies Bleeding
128 | Notes on Noses
411 Calunny

176
Poet's Wishes, the
16 Other Fig, the
286 Canadian Winter Wonders

221
Prayer
272 | Paul at Athens
110 Childhood

224
Prisoner's Dream, the
208 Peep at Scinde, a
203 Childhood

304
Song of the Passions, the 192

Concluded
212 Chinese Fishing-birds

114
Sonnets : Summer; Beauty 336 Persian Ambassador, Anecdote Christian Weapons Spiritual 288
Stanzas to May
256 of

333 Coffee among the Arabs 143
We are Seven
368 Petcherai Indians
251 | Comparison, a

160

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Comparison, a
224 Intellectual Culture

96 Rustic Politeness

208
Consecration to God
336 | Irish Negro, an
160 Self-Flattery

400
Contentment
272 Jesting
144 Self-Knowledge

272
Conversation
176 Knowledge of External Nature 127 Selfishness

48
Crocodile Shooting
16 Knowledge of Life

88 Sheridan and the Gamekeeper 96
Death of Infants
368 Knowledge Limited
256 Simile, a

144
Dew
288 Laughter
351 Simple Tastes

336
Diffusion of Light
143 Life a Chequered Scene
144 Sin

304
Dog, the
144 Life Without an Aim 208 Singular Adventures

240
Dust
304 | Literature

160 Sir Walter Scott and the Irish
Emblem of Happiness, an
64 Little Knowledge not Danger- Reaper

111
Error Progressive
208

64 Small Motives

202
Evidences of Christianity, the 224 Little Philosophy, a

400 Sorrow for the Dead

32
Fashion
208 Man
288 Sultan and his Falcon, the

176
Fate of the Eminent, the 288 Masked Ball, a

207 | Taste for the Beautiful, a 272
Fidelity of a Dog
159 Mean Habit, a

80 Taste for the Beauties of Nature 336
Fine Truth Finely Spoken, a 32 Mental Dissipation

32 | Tastes of Poets

368
First and Last Thoughts 48 Mercy Twice Blessed

176 Temerity and Timerity

96
First Lesson in Music, the 96 Milton

256 Tendency of Atheism

320
64 Milton's Blindness
336 | Tests of Affection

140
Forms of Intemperance
288 Moderation
320 Tests of Books

320
Funeral at Sea
400 Money

368 Twenty Dissuasives from Des-
Goat, the
304 Money Hunting
224 pondency

80
Good Breeding
64 Mother's Love, a

18 Types of the Resurrection 256
Good Conscience, a
18 Mothers and Daughters
48 Universal Example, a

192
Good Temper
384 Music
224 Useful Hint, a

80
Good Word, a
79 Narrow Boundary, a
111 Useful Hint, a

272
Grave of Friends, the
48 | No Trust in Princes
111 Varieties of Excellence

336
Great Minds
256 Object of Envy, an

336 Vesuvius and Niagara
Happiness
256 Opinion of the Bible
127 | Vice a Coward

64
Heart the Seat of Evil, the 287 Ostrich Chase, an

16 | Virtue Without Fear

272
Hint to Idlers, a
368 | Our Capabilities

64 | Watches

416
Home
176 Our Lives like Rivers
80 Way to Advise, the

272
Home
400 Parting

160 Way to be Happy in Old Age 32
Hunger in Cold Weather 126 Persons Unlikely to Serve You 384 What the Press is Doing 112
Hypocrisy Creditable to Religion 112 Physiognomy

304 Whitefield

160
Ignorance Bliss
192 Power of Knowledge

256 Wisdom of Faith
Ignorance of the Future
64 Power of the English Language 80 Wit and Judgment

416
I Got Wealth
224 Preparation for Death
288 Woman in Affliction

64
Importance of Religion to Society 112 Present Knowledge Partial 112 Woman in Affliction

384
Importance of the Season of Progress in Life

384 | Woman's Love

127
Youth
48 Religion of a Physician, the 240 | Word to Bachelors, a

160
Imprudence
48 Remote Systems of Stars 41 | World, the

112
Indian Sagacity
144 Revelation of Futurity, the 368 Worth of Books

208
Industry
381' Romance Reading
192 ' Zeno

143

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No. 1.

EDINBURGH, SATURDAY, MARCH 1, 1845.

PRICE 13d.

allusion to the Christian religion. We could name many THOUGHTS AT STARTING.

able treatises on physical science, for example, many It has been smartly said by one of the ablest of our exquisite poems, many charming romances, which we moralists, that men seldom talk about themselves with reckon among the choicest of our intellectual treasures ; success; for, when they blame themselves, far more is and yet no reader could infer from these that any revelabelieved than is expressed, and when they praise them- tion from heaven had ever been imparted to man. There selves, much less. There are comparatively few who do are numberless works, worth far more than their weight not need to ponder this remark frequently, and who in gold, on whose pages you will look in vain for any would not make themselves greatly more agreeable to recognition of that system of truth to which we are inthose around them by acting on the advice it suggests. debted for our richest comforts and dearest hopes. We shall try to profit by the moralist's shrewd hint, and There is a place as well as a time for every thing. And make as sparing a use as possible of the first personal we would not have a word to say to any literary or scienpronoun in conducting the periodical which we now send tific journalist–far less would we cherish a hard thought into the world, with warm hopes that it shall soon occupy respecting him—although, in discussing a great many toa high place in public esteem, and which we beg, very pics, there should not be even the most distant allusion humbly, and very affectionately, to dedicate to all good to Christianity—its great motives, its pure precepts, its people everywhere. We shall endeavour not to forget sublime discoveries. There are some departments, howthe advice to talk little about ourselves; and so cordially ever, from which it cannot, without infinite hazard, be do we approve of it, that, even on this, our introductory shut out. There are certain provinces from which it page, we shall refrain from violating it. It is right, will not do to banish sacred truth. There are themes, however, that we speak definitely as to the motives which in unfolding which, if you be studiously silent about have induced us to come into the field—the richly clad the light from on high, you virtually scorn it. The field, we are happy to think, of cheap weekly literature; reader will get at our meaning best, should we advert and as to our plans, principles, and prospects.

for a moment to the tactics of the class of writers we have We do not hesitate, then, to say, that Hogg's WEEKLY now in view, and who, we are willing to believe, are not INSTRUCTOR originated in a motive purer and better than fully aware of the amount of mischief they are doing. a thirst for distinction, or a desire to make money. None They do not assail Christianity; they say nothing against of these things ought to be despised; no right-thinking its Author, and that remedial scheme he came to our person will despise them; still, nameless contributions in world to execute. But search page after page of their a cheap weekly miscellany are not likely to gain for any writings, even when religion, as they employ that term, one that name which makes an epitaph ; and as for the happens to be their theme, and you will fail to discover more marketable commodity, we quite assent to the well-proof of its peculiar truths having been uttered in their known adage of Sir Walter Scott, that literature, though hearing. They descant on this and that scheme for reit may be a good staff, is a bad crutch. The INSTRUCTOR, generating our world, dispelling its ignorance, curing its though not strictly religious in its character, had its vices, diminishing its wretchedness, but not a whisper origin, we are not ashamed to confess, in religious feel all the while about that gospel which has done and is ings and motives. It can scarcely have escaped the no- still doing so much to elevate and bless mankind. They tice of any discerning person, that a very large propor- delineate characters of exquisite virtue; they describe tion of the periodical literature of the day is character- them in circumstances the most affecting and tryingin ized, if not by a decided enmity to the Christian faith, sorrow, in sickness, and even in the prospect of quitting at least by a cold and obstinate silence respecting it,-a the present scene—as acting with purity, dignity, and silence which, when maintained in contributions upon a grace—and all this without the slightest advertence to certain class of subjects, we cannot but regard as indicat- that faith which Christianity enjoins, and those hopes it ing a suspicion of the divinity of its claims—may we inspires. They do not rudely inveigh against the truths not say, a sullen contempt for them? We are anxious of Scripture; they quietly leave you to infer that they not to be misunderstood. We would fain give no uncer- are altogether unnecessary—that society and individuals tain sound. We wish to speak guardedly but firmly. may safely dispense with them. This is the scepticism It would say little for our candour, not to mention our -negative, it will be perceived, rather than positive taste, did we read without relish a discourse on a purely in its character—which, we apprehend, is doing sad literary or scientific subject, or call its writer an unbe- damage among us. It has not a few of the charms liever, merely because it should happen to contain no of literature, philosophy, and poetry, about it; and we dread it, we own, far more than the subtle sophistries ning's fiery wing.' There is Physiology, unfolding to us of Hume, or the bold thrusts of Voltaire. It is all very the structure of the inferior tribes, and the mechanism well to talk of the cross' as now redeemed from re- of our own frame, so 'fearfully and wonderfully made.' proach, as the ensign the nations love, as adorning the There is Metaphysics, with its keen and searching glance neck of beauty, emblazoned on the banners of battle, into the laws that regulate our thoughts and affections. and stuck on the sceptres and crowns of royalty ; with There are these and kindred themes, whose tendency is these outward tokens of respect and veneration there is to refine the taste, exalt the imagination, and, by prestill such a thing as being ashamed of it. And we deem senting us with proofs of the wisdom and love of the it no violation of charity to say, that those writers are Creator, deepen the piety of the spirit. To whatever exguilty in this respect, who, in discussing topics such as tent these shall be discussed in our pages, we trust we we have alluded to, treat Christianity as if it had yet to shall not forget that humility which so well becomes begin its career of triumphs in our world. The parties man when investigating the works of his Maker, which who are to take charge of the INSTRUCTOR wish it then to Newton so beautifully displayed when he compared himbe distinctly understood, that they have no sympathy with self to a boy picking up shells by the great ocean Truin;those who thus keep the Christian revelation studiously in or when—more touching still perhaps-speaking of a giftthe back ground, or rather coldly beckon it to the door. ed cotemporary, who had gone to an early grave, he reThey feel that its claims to the respect and gratitude of marked : “If that young man had lived we should have mankind are too strong, that its influence is too great, and kpown something.' its sacred character too well attested, to admit of its being Literature has charms more inviting to many minds treated as a nonentity. They believe it propounds obliga- than science. It is wrong to exalt the former at the extions to virtuous conduct, higher and more lasting than pense of the latter. We concur in the observation of a mere temporal convenience or worldly respectability; and great poet, lately gone to his rest, that none but maniacs to these they shall never be ashamed to appeal. In a word, would propose to tear down any of the branches of the without encroaching upon the ground already occupied by tree of knowledge, though they may not bear fruit to strictly religious publications, and making theirs a vehicle their taste or garlands to their honour. 'Scaliger,' he for theological discussion--a thing nerer contemplated— adds, ‘has incurred only the contempt of posterity by his they intend that there shall be such a recognition of absurd diatribe against the usefulness of mathematics; Christianity—its precepts, its hopes, its motives, and dis- and neither Swift nor Johnson have much raised themcoveries—as will show that they regard it as the only safe selves in the estimation of wise men by having underand perfect rule of belief and action. This deference to valued the natural sciences. For it is clear that those men the 'true Light,' they venture to predict, will not make were misled by overweening vanity in their own pursuits, their pages, in any respect whatever, less attractive. and by shallowness in those pursuits which they decried,

Having spoken thus freely, and we hope intelligibly, thus bringing into monstrous conjunction the pride of respecting the principles upon which this new candidate | learning with the envy of ignorance.' We sincerely refor public favour is to be conducted, we may, in a few spect both tastes—that for physical science and that for sentences, indicate the general character of its contents. literature also : we would earnestly persuade our readIt were easy to draw up a showy bill of fare, and to pro- ers to cultivate both; we shall do what we can to gratify mise a great variety of sumptuous dishes, even though both. In attempting this, attention will be paid to anthe means of producing them should not be at hand; cient as well as modern literature; to the productions of but we will not mock our friends in this way. We shall the most eminent authors in other lands as well as to take care not to promise more than we think we shall those of our own countrymen. Their peculiarities of be able to perform, but shall endeavour rather to let our thought and style; the influence their writings have exdeeds surpass our words.

erted, especially in retarding or accelerating the improveAs may be inferred from the nature of the work, we do ment of mankind; their tendency, whether vicious or not intend to treat our readers to lengthened and elabo- virtuous; these and similar topics will pass in review rate dissertations on scientific subjects. We would fain before us, and prove, we hope, both agreeable and inhave our papers of such length, and of such a character, structive to our readers. It may be proper to add, that that while the busy shall find sufficient tine to read we contemplate a series of sketches, of some extent, rethem, the idle may muster patience. Extended treatises sembling that of Thomas Babington Macaulay in the upon any topic, but especially one demanding severe thought present number. That series shall embrace exclusively and patient inquiry, would, it is obvious, frustrate this those whose writings have influenced to a considerable design completely. Still, a short chapter will be devoted degree the sentiments and tastes either of their cotemnow and then to some particular branch of science—some poraries or of posterity. We are not unaware of the of its interesting facts or latest discoveries, which our difficulty of this undertaking; of the fact that there is readers, we are sure, will find not only instructive but scarcely anything in the wide range of literature harder entertaining. Here, we need scarcely tell them, the field to execute, at least in a style that will please the inis both beautiful and boundless. There is Astronomy, telligent and tasteful. May we venture to hope that with its far off worlds. There is Geology, every day in this matter we have counted the cost, and that to bringing up fresh wonders from the depths of the mine our Portrait Gallery, as picture after picture is proor the caves of the deep. There is Chemistry, acquaint- duced, our kind friends will eagerly repair, in the confiing us with the various elements and properties of ma- dence of finding something fresh and graphic? We terial bodies. There is Botany, with its wild flowers and flatter ourselves there are among our enlisted contriits gardens of beauty and bloom. There is Electricity, butors some one or two who can handle the brush in this showing us how, with Franklin, we may.grasp the light-line with no ordinary power ; whose pictures have already

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