Lectures on the history and principles of painting

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Página 200 - Last noon beheld them full of lusty life, Last eve in Beauty's circle proudly gay, The midnight brought the signal-sound of strife, The morn the marshalling in arms - the day Battle's magnificently stern array...
Página 197 - The other Shape — If shape it might be called that shape had none Distinguishable in member, joint, or limb...
Página 198 - The other shape, If shape it might be called that shape had none Distinguishable, in member, joint, or limb; Or substance might be called that shadow seemed, For each seemed either; black he stood as night; Fierce as ten furies; terrible as hell; And shook a deadly dart. What seemed his head The likeness of a kingly crown had on.
Página 314 - The poetry of Shakespear was inspiration indeed : he is not so much an imitator, as an instrument, of Nature ; and it is not so just to say that he speaks from her, as that she speaks through him.
Página iii - If to do were as easy as to know what were^ good to do, chapels had been churches, and poor men's cottages princes' palaces. It is a good divine that follows his own instructions: I can easier teach twenty what were good to be done, than be one of the twenty to follow mine own teaching.
Página 253 - Yet nature is made better by no mean, But nature makes that mean: so, o'er that art, Which you say adds to nature, is an art That nature makes.
Página 449 - Thus if .a portrait-painter is desirous to raise and improve his subject, he has no other means than by approaching it to a general idea. He leaves out all the minute breaks and peculiarities in the face, and changes the dress from a temporary fashion to one more permanent. which has annexed to it no ideas of meanness from its being familiar to us.
Página 199 - So spake the grisly terror, and in shape, So speaking and so threatening, grew tenfold More dreadful and deform. On...
Página 372 - The common error that his colours all fail, ought by this time to be entirely effaced. It is too true that this is the case with the colouring of many pictures painted by him during a short period of his life; he thought that he had discovered a mode of rendering colouring more vivid, and employed it without duly considering the chemical qualities of his materials. But he was soon made acquainted with the mistake he had committed, reassumed his durable system with increased beauty and vigour, and...
Página 345 - Consonance, or harmony of hue, consists in those colours being brought together, which, though they may not be placed exactly in the regular order seen in the rainbow or in the chromatic scale, yet act in accordance with each other upon the eye, and produce no uneasy sensations within it, but rather afford it pleasure.

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