The White Sea Peninsula, a Journey in Russian Lapland and Karelia

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J. Murray, 1881 - 347 páginas
 

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Página 260 - Whether it were a whistling wind; or a melodious noise of birds among the spreading branches, or a pleasing fall of water running violently, or a terrible sound of stones cast down, or a running that could not be seen of skipping beasts, or a roaring voice of most savage wild beasts, or a rebounding echo from the hollow mountains; these things made them to swoon for fear.
Página 260 - Whether it were a whistling wind, or a melodious noise of birds among the spreading branches, or a pleasing fall of water running violently, or a terrible sound of stones cast down, or a running that could not be seen of skipping beasts, or a roaring voice of most savage wild beasts, or a rebounding echo from the hollow mountains; these things made them to swoon for fear.
Página 2 - Chanceler held on his course towards that unknowen part of the world, and sailed so farre, that hee came at last to the place where hee found no night at all, but a continuall light and brightnesse of the Sunne shining clearely upon the huge and mightie Sea.
Página 48 - ... to do their duty in that state of life to which it has pleased God to call them.
Página 277 - We shall then discover the secrets of nature; the darkness shall be discussed, and our souls irradiated with light and glory : a glory without a shadow ; a glory that shall surround us, and from whence we shall look down and see day and night beneath us. If we cannot lift up our eyes toward the lamp of heaven without dazzling, what shall we do when we come to behold the divine light in its illustrious original...
Página 277 - We have but faith; we cannot know: For knowledge is of things we see ; And yet we trust it comes from thee, A beam in darkness: let .it grow.
Página 237 - tis something; we may stand Where he in English earth is laid, And from his ashes may be made The violet of his native land.
Página 2 - Malestrand which . . . maketh such a terrible noise, that it shaketh the rings in the doores of the inhabitants' houses of the sayd islands tenne miles off.
Página 89 - At this Cape lieth a great stone, to the which the barkes that passed thereby, were wont to make offerings of butter, meale and other victuals, thinking that unlesse they did so, their barkes or vessels should there perish, as it hath been oftentimes seene ; and there it is very darke and mistie.

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