The World That Made New Orleans: From Spanish Silver to Congo Square

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Chicago Review Press, 2008 - 368 páginas
Offering a new perspective on the unique cultural influences of New Orleans, this entertaining history captures the soul of the city and reveals its impact on the rest of the nation. Focused on New Orleans' first century of existence, a comprehensive, chronological narrative of the political, cultural, and musical development of Louisiana's early years is presented. This innovative history tracks the important roots of American music back to the swamp town, making clear the effects of centuries-long struggles among France, Spain, and England on the city's unique culture. The origins of jazz and the city's eclectic musical influences, including the role of the slave trade, are also revealed. Featuring little-known facts about the cultural development of New Orleans--such as the real significance of gumbo, the origins of the tango, and the first appearance of the words vaudeville and voodoo-- this rich historical narrative explains how New Orleans' colonial influences shape the city still today.

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Reseña de usuario  - drbrand - LibraryThing

I was both frustrated and inspired by The World That Made New Orleans. I am convinced that amidst all of Sublette's unqualified conjectures and bitter diatribes, there is a truly valuable historical ... Leer reseña completa

LibraryThing Review

Reseña de usuario  - Widsith - LibraryThing

POSTCARD FROM NEW ORLEANS Every street here has its own soundtrack. I can't walk along Royal without hearing ‘One last walk down Royal Street…same old blues, sad and sweet…’ playing in my head. I ... Leer reseña completa

Índice

COLONIZATION
17
REVOLUTION
131
PURCHASE
207
CODA
291
Acknowledgments
314
Notes
319
Bibliography
327
Index
343
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Página 213 - Deep rooted prejudices entertained by the whites; ten thousand recollections, by the blacks, of the injuries they have sustained; new provocations; the real distinctions which nature has made; and many other circumstances, will divide us into parties, and produce convulsions, which will probably never end but in the extermination of the one or the other race.
Página 237 - Jesus, my All, to heaven is gone, He whom I fix my hopes upon; His track I see, and I'll pursue The narrow way, till him I view.
Página 68 - May it please, your worships, these men are great disturbers of the peace, they cannot meet a man upon the road but they must ram a text of Scripture down his throat.
Página 240 - twill never be light; A few more days till we totter on the road: — Then my old Kentucky home, good-night ! Weep no more, my lady, O, weep no more to-day!
Página 214 - ... recollections, by the blacks, of the injuries they have sustained; new provocations; the real distinctions which nature has made; and many other circumstances, will divide us into parties, and produce convulsions which will probably never end but in the extermination of the one or the other race. To these objections, which are political, may be added others, which are physical and moral.
Página 214 - This greater degree of transpiration renders them more tolerant of heat, and less so of cold, than the whites.
Página 214 - They seem to require less sleep. A black, after hard labour through the day, will be induced by the slightest amusements to sit up till midnight or later, though knowing he must be out with the first dawn of the morning.

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