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19. Fawn Bitch, sister to lot 14....

£3 15 20. Black and White Dog, by Fyson's Figaro out of Pridmore's Black Fly

4 15 21. Fawn Doz ..

24 0 22. Black and White Dog, brother to lot 20

7 10 23. Black and White Bitch, sister to lot 20 24. Black and White Bitch......

0 13 25. Fawn Bitch

4 0 Well- 1 - Never, who was included in the lot advertised, died before the sale.

STATE OF THE ODDS, &c.

SALE OF BLOOD STOCK. The Messrs. Hall have added the stallion Kremlin, sire of many good runners, to their establishment at Dudding Hill Farm, which now inclndes The Libel, Epirus, Kremlin, &c. Mr. Armstrong has sold Ravenshill to Mr. Ferguson, of Harker Lodge, Carlisle. The stallion Paragon goes to Spain, having been bought for the Duke of Osuna. Mr. T. Dawson has sold Woldsman (late Scarborough) to the French Government, which has lately made a purchase of Velos. Harkaway was knocked down in Ireland a few days since for something over five hundred; he has hardly realized what was expected of him as a stallion. Mr. Andrew, of Saltburn, has purchased Hippolytus of Lord Eglinton for the stud; and Mr. Blythe has bought Ace of Trumps, by Iago--he goes into Joseph Dawson's stable.

The stallion Venison, sire of Alarm, Cariboo, Kingston, and others, is amongst the deaths we have to record; as well as of St. Denis, a Derby colt, in work at Danebury; Proudfoot, who broke down so badly that it was found necessary to destroy him ; Quiz, by Worlaby Baylock, and a yearling filly out of Queen of Tyne. We see, by the way, that some of the local papers have been killing old Charity, the steeple-chaser, over again. We recollect registering his “departure" some years since.

“ THE TRINKET Afrair.”—A bit of provincialism, attempted by mistake at Newmarket, has been thus appreciated at head-quarters. May it be a lesson to others more fortunate than “ John Thomas" has been :-“The stewards of the Jockey Club having heard the evidence in support of the complaint made by the Clerk of the Scales against John Thomas Hughes, the owner of the mare Trinket, after the race won by her on Wednesday in the last Houghton Meeting at Newmarket, and having fully considered all the circumstances of the case, have decided that Mr. Hughes shall not henceforth be allowed to run any horse at Newmarket, or to come on the race-course or exercise ground there, and they recommend that he should be excluded from all race-courses where the rules and regulations of Newmarket are in force."

Mr. In man, who has occasionally made some sensation in fulfilling his duties as clerk of the course at Lincoln, has left the country. The police are in pursuit; his accounts, it is said, requiring such explanation as may make his presence necessary for their becoming adjustment.

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The disputed plate at Northallerton has been awarded to Jack Leeming.

Christmas time, as usual, makes but dull work of turf speculation, however merrily it may work in other ways. Our Derby account goes more to show how seldom the majority of the favourites have been mentioned of late than anything very strong, yea or nay, about them. Cineas still continues to furnish the chief topic for conversation; and, notwithstanding the number of gentlemen inclined to speak ill of him, he finishes the month and year with a better appearance than ever.

West Australian yet holds his own with much promise of keeping the premiership—the more particularly as very little of late has been done on either the The Reiver or Orestes. Pharos, Umbriel, and Brocket, on the other hand, are in more continued request; but “ the demonstration ” has done little to alter the average prices for some time taken about them. The longer shots and less prominent names call for no explanation beyond that a study of the table will afford.

A tolerably satisfactory handicap for the Metropolitan has already began to marshal the forces for that event into something like order. The weights begin with the two four-year-olds, Weathergage and Kingston, at 9st. each; and close with a three-year-old at 4st. The forfeits will be in by New Year's-day, when of course the prices will become still more ship-shape. In the interim, since the publication of the handicap, the following have been selected : -30' to 1 each against Galvanism, four years old, 6st. 3lb. ; Muscovite, four years old, 7st. 6lb.; and Contentment, three years old, 4st. 7lb. 33 to 1 each against Tobolski, three years old, 4st. 4lb. ; The Hatchet, three years old, 5st. 61b.; The Wedlock filly, three years old, 4st. 101b.; Colsterdale, five years old, 7st. 5lb.; and Ammonia, four years old, 7st. 40 to 1 each against Nerva, three years old, 4st. 81b. ; Lampedo, three years old, 4st.; Wedding Day filly, four years old, 6st. 21b.; Llanforda, three years old, 5st.; and Lord Fauconberg, three years old, 5st. 121b. 1,000 to 20 against Weathergage, four years old, Yst.

THE CHESTER CUP.-1,000 to 15 each against Ethelbert and Weathergage; 300 to 5 against Merry-bird ; 1,000 to 12 each against Cardinal Wiseman and Confessor ; 50 to 1 against Nancy; and 100 to 1 against Ireland's Eye.

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Last Quar., 1st day, at 1 min. past 6 morning.
New Moon, 8th day, at 34 min. past 5 morning.
First Quar., 16th day, at 12 min. past 3 morning.
Full Moon, 23rd day, at 24 min. past 7 afternoon.

Sun

Moon High WATER OCCURRENCES.

rises and rises & London Bridge. sets.

sets. morn. | aftern.

M.W.
D. D.

RISES
Morning

m. h.

m.

ON SETS.

atlernoon.

[ends. h. m. d. h. 1 T Pheasarit and Partridge shootingr 7 41 23 0 47 7 0 7 24 2 W Baldoch Coursing Meeting. s 4 4924 2 10 7 50 8 22 3 T Hilton Coursing Meeting. r 7 38 25 3 31 8 0 9 40 4F

s 4 53 26 4 49 10 1511 0 5 S

1 7 3427 5 5711 40 No tide 6 S Shrobe Sunday.

3 4 56 28 6 53 0 15 0 50 7 M Newmarket Coursing Meeting. r 7 31 29 7 34 1 20 1 45 8 T Shrove Tuesday.

s 5

2 10, 2 35 9 W Lent begins.

r 7 27 1 6 26 2 55 3 15 10 T Bath Steeple Chases.

s 5 4 2 7 40 3 35 3 55 11 F

r 7 24 3 8 51 4 10 4 30 12 s

7, 410 0.4 45 5 5 13 $ first Sunday in Lent. r 7 20, 511 8 5 20 5 35 14 M Valentine's Day.

s 5,116, 5 55 6 10 15 T Lincoln Spring Races.

r 7 16 7 0 15 6 25 6 45 16 W Ember Week. Aylesbury St. Ch.s 5 15 8 1 23 7 5 7 25 17 T Hereford Races.

r 7 12 9 2 30 7 50 8 20 18 F Hereford Steeple Chases. s 5 18 10 3 34 8 55 9 3.) 19 S

811 4 34 10 15 10 5.) 20 Second Sunday in Lent. s 5 22 12 5 29 11 3.7 No tide 21 M

r 7 4 13 6 14 0 15 0 45 22 T Coventry Spring M.

s 5 26 14 6 30 1 10 1 30 23 W Coventry Steeple Chases.

r 7 OF RISES.

1 55 2 15 24 T St. Matthias.

s 5 29 16 6 2 2 35 2 55 25 F Sutton Steeple Chases.

r 6 5617 7 47 3 15 3 30 26 s

s 5 33 18 9 9 3 50 4 10 27 $ Third Sunday in Lent, 1 6 52 1910 35 4 30 4 50 28 M

s 5 36 20 11 58 5 10 5 30

Morning

afternoon.

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STEEPLE CHASES IN FEBRUARY.
7 & 8

Hereford
10

Kingstown
Bath
Vale of Aylesbury
Lincoln

IS

Coventry 16

Sutton

...... 16

COURSING MEETINGS IN FEBRUARY. Daron Hill

Malton

...... 8 & 9 | Cardington .. 15, 16, 17 & 18 Billoch 2&3! Border ............. 8, 9 & 10 / Mulgrave

16 Hilton ...... 3 & Sunilorn...

10 Bivgar ........ 16, 17 & 14 Newarket 7 Brough 10 & 11 Limerick

23 x 24 Workington ........ 7 & 8 / Holywell

15
Dirleton

...... 24 & 25 Scorton, Ere:leigh, Spelthorne, and Knipe Scar not fixed.

“THE FASHION OF OUR SPORT.”

BY CRAVEN

That for which no other land has a corresponding characteristic class of popular recreative pursuits, and no other language an equivalent in its vocabulary-so truthfully and elegantly interpreted in the phrase of Shakspeare—“ the fashion of our sport”-is the text of this discourse. Sporting is our theme-gossiped of in its own frank spirit of good fellowship, in the letter occasionally; but, when dealt with practically in relation to its office, always treated as a diversion, never as the business of social life. Moreover, into our speculation-narrative--deduction—shall enter no leaven of criticism. At last—longo post tempore venit—the hour has arrived in which satire's “ occupation's gone.” It struggled hard for a little more leave and licence; but good sense and good taste triumphed, and it is on its headlong course to join that phalanx of conventional abuses, wrongs, oppressions, and contumelies, on which the future will look back and smile,” even as we recoil and shudder at their memories of the past. “How custom breeds a habit in a man !Freedom, that especial heritage of nature, is a communal exotic of most tardy growth. Slavery is an institution of primæval association : Despotism inscribes its charter with the blood of the savage : Serfdom is a relic of barbarous ages, from which Europe is not yet emancipated : and Smithfield has scarce had time to cool from the zeal of orthodoxy which was wont to convert its proselytes —to cinders. " A mad world, my masters,” now just bestirring itself for the recovery of its wits......

Among the antique legion dodges of charlatanrie there is not onewhen people cool with occasion, and analyze it, cause and effect--which will scare the mind of the next century more than the toleration in this of a self-constituted body-anonymous" indoctiambubaiarum collegia-of literary censors, whose office was as obvious as it was odious--as offensive to common sense as opposed to common honesty, to say nothing about honour. The following exposition of the philosophy of critiques shows that most monstrous of anomalies in the true light of an instinctive and experienced perspicacity. The writer, having been in the oven himself, was consulted by those concerned in the welfare of a well-known literary periodical, when it was fast falling from its pride of place. After preluding a little, as race-horses canter before they go to work in earnest, he observes-this, of course, “ private and confidential" at the time, but flaring up in a memoir of the defunct-like Byron's, Sheridan's, Tom Moore's, and many another departed gentleman's antecedents-

“ The bookseller keeps a Review to praise his own works, and put down other people's. This, however, cannot be satisfactorily carried out

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