Ethics, Trust, and the Professions: Philosophical and Cultural Aspects

Portada
Edmund D. Pellegrino, Robert M. Veatch, John Langan
Georgetown University Press, 1991 - 284 páginas

The essays in Ethics, Trust, and the Professions probe the nature of the fiduciary relationship that binds client to lawyer, believer to minister, and patient to doctor. Angles of approach include history, sociology, philosophy, and culture, and their very multiplicity reveals how difficult we find it to formulate a code of ethics which will insure a relationship of trust between the professional and the public.

 

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Índice

Robert Sokolowski
23
Zaner
45
Pellegrino
69
Allen Buchanan
93
Dan W Brock
113
Are There Virtues Inherent in a Profession?
139
Veatch
159
Samuel Gorovitz
177
Nourishing Professionalism
193
John Langan
221
Rihito Kimura
235
HansMartin Sass
263
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Sobre el autor (1991)

Edmund D. Pellegrino is the leading physician-philosopher of medicine in the United States. Born in Newark, New Jersey, he was educated at St. John's University and received his M.D. from New York University in 1944. From 1959 to 1966 he was professor and chairman of the Department of Medicine at the University of Kentucky, where he was involved in introducing a medical-humanities curriculum. He then held a number of administrative positions: academic vice-president and dean of the School of Medicine at the State University of New York at Stony Brook (1966--73), chancellor and vice-president for health affairs at the University of Tennessee (1973--75), president of the Yale-New Haven Medical Center (1975--78), president of the Catholic University of America (1978--82), and director of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics at Georgetown University (1983-89). He is currently director of the Center for the Advanced Study of Ethics at Georgetown University. During his career, Pellegrino has remained extremely active in professional societies for the medical humanities. He has also been a prolific author of medical articles, including articles on medical ethics and medical humanities, and he has written two books on the philosophy of medicine. Pellegrino is best known, however, as a dynamic lecturer to medical school faculties, medical students, and the general public on a wide variety of topics relevant to medical ethics and the philosophy of medicine. Although no books have been written about Pellegrino, the spring 1990 issue of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy is devoted to a discussion of his philosophy.

Robert Veatch is currently a professor of medical ethics at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics and professor of philosophy at Georgetown University. For ten years previously, he was on the staff of the Hastings Center (formerly the Institute of Society, Ethics, and the Life Sciences). Veatch was born in Utica, New York, and received a B.S. degree from Purdue University (1961), an M.S. from the University of California at San Francisco (1962), and a B.D. (1964), M.A.(1970), and Ph.D. (1971) from Harvard University. A lecturer and writer, Veatch is the author of many important books on ethical issues in biology and medicine. Veatch's areas of interest center on the relation of science to public policy, death and dying, and experimentation on human subjects. He has worked both to assemble numerous case studies and to advance general theoretical reflection in these areas. In A Theory of Medical Ethics (1981), he argues that current medical codes such as the Hippocratic Oath are too restrictive and lack sufficient support for comprehensive use in the medical profession. The solution, he argues, is that medicine can no longer be based on a professionally articulated code. Instead, Veatch proposes a "covenant" theory of medical ethics that resembles the traditional social contract of philosophers such as John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

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