Life of Marcus Tullius Cicero, Volumen 1

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Murray, 1869 - 557 páginas

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Página 201 - You would have thought the very windows spake, So many greedy looks of young and old Through casements darted their desiring eyes Upon his visage, and that all the walls With painted imagery had said at once 'Jesu preserve thee! welcome, Bolingbroke!
Página 32 - May we know what this new doctrine, whereof thou speakest, is? 20 For thou bringest certain strange things to our ears : we would know therefore what these things mean. 21 (For all the Athenians, and strangers which were there, spent their time in nothing else, but either to tell or to hear some new thing...
Página 494 - The words of his mouth were smoother than butter, but war was in his heart: his words were softer than oil, yet were they drawn swords.
Página 57 - But little do men perceive what solitude is, and how far it extendeth. For a crowd is not company, and faces are but a gallery of pictures, and talk but a tinkling cymbal, where there is no love.
Página 478 - My sentence is for open war : of wiles, More unexpert, I boast not : them let those Contrive who need, or when they need, not now...
Página 320 - That never set a squadron in the field, Nor the division of a battle knows More than a spinster...
Página 6 - He, the young and strong, who cherished Noble longings for the strife, By the roadside fell and perished, Weary with the march of life!
Página 328 - Blessed are the barren, and the wombs that never bare, and the paps which never gave suck. Then shall they begin to say to the mountains, Fall on us ; and to the hills, Cover us. For if they do these things in a green tree, what shall be done in the dry ? And there were also two other, malefactors, led with him to be put to death.
Página 26 - Rome themselves presided at the trials — just as was the case sometimes in France in the middle ages — for we are told that the good king St. Louis, in the thirteenth century, used, after hearing mass in the summer season, to lay himself at the foot of an oak in the wood of Vincennes, and make his courtiers sit round him ; when all who wished were allowed to approach him, and he would ask aloud if there were any present who had suits.
Página 63 - Say, for you saw us, ye immortal lights, How oft unwearied have we spent the nights, Till the Ledaean stars, so famed for love, Wonder'd at us from above! We spent them not in toys, in lusts, or wine ; But search of deep Philosophy, Wit, Eloquence, and Poetry, Arts which I loved, for they, my friend, were thine.

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