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DAILY PRICES OF STOCKS, FROM APRIL 26, 1816, TO MAY 25, 1816, BOTH INCLUSIVE. Bank 13 perCt. 3 per Ct. 4 perCt. 5 per Ct. Long Irish 3 per Cu Imu.

India So. SealO.S.S. New S. 5 per Ct. 138 per Day 3 per Day: Consol Stock. Redu. Consals. Cons.

Navy.

Anns.
5 per Ct Imp. Auns. Omnium. Stock. Stock. Anns. Sea An. Ind. Bon. Ex. Bills. Ex. Bills,

for Ac.
17
603 62 1755 $92 153

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Exchequer Bills, dated prior to the month of June, 1815, have been advertised to be paid off, and the Interest thercon has ceased. 3. The above Tulle contains the highest and lowest prices, taken from the Course of the Exchange, &c, originally published by John Castaign, in the year 1912, and now ied, every Tuesday and Friday, under the authority of the Committee of the Stock Exchange, ly

JAMES WETENILALL, Stock-Broker, No. 7, Capel court, Bartholonew-lanc, London,

On application to whoin, the original documents for near a century part may be rewlo

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AGRICULTURAL REPORT. THE past month commenced with very wet cold weather. The quantity of water that fell in the midland counties by far exceeded that of any former May within recolleetion ; the effects of which upon agriculture are very obvious to the traveller. The low lands were inundated, and the tenacious soils so uncommonly saturated with the redundant water, as to chill the corn near the furrows, and to sadden the higher parts from which it could escape more freely. No season since 1799 has so clearly shown to the farmer the great importance of under-draining arable land, as no practice is so sure of rendering the soil certain in all seasons.

The young wheat upon clay subsoils is a thin plant, but upon percolating breadths strong, healthful, and forward. The warm weather about the middle of the month caused the crop to put on a more promising appearance than it had in the preceding month.

Barley is very backward in appearance, and much set upon tenacious soils from the wet cold weather ; but upon the sands and light loams it has a promising appearance, though not so forward in growth as in milder seasons.

Oats are also backward, but thick set upon the ground.

Beans, peas, and all the leguminous species, have had a rapid growth, and promise a great and early crop.

The soiling tribe are not so good as in more favourable seasons: they are thin upon the ground, and appear much injured by the cold wet weather.

The brassicas, what small portion was left from the severity of the season, have not run so early as they do in warmer springs.

Hops throw up a strong bine, and the orchards have the most promising appearance. From the backward state of the blossom we may expect a great fruit season.

The pastures and grass upon high lands have grown much since the weather changed, and promise an early full crop.

CORN EXCHANGE, MAY 27.-Wheat, foreign, 625. to 888.-Do. English, 665. to 945. Rye, 30s. to 388.---Barley, 245. to 345.-Malt, 535. to 655.-Oats, 21s. to 345.-Fine Flour, 70s. to 75s. ; Seconds, 655. to 70s.

SMITHFIELD MARKET, MAY 27.-Beef, 35. 8d. to 55.--Mutton, 4s. to ss. 4d.-Lamb, 6s. to 75. 4d.-Veal, 45. 4d. to 6s.--Pork, 4s, to 5s. per stone of 8 lbs.

St. James's.-Hay, 31. 35. to 51. 58.–Straw, 21. 5s. to 21. 11s.

Hops, New Pockets.-Kent, 61. 6s. to 10l. 105.-Sussex, 51. 155. to sl. 88.-Essex, 71, to gl.-Farnham, 101. os. to 161.

Average Prices of Corn,
By the Quarter of Eight Winchester Bushels, from the Returns received in the Week ended

May 18, 1816.
MARITIME COUNTIES.

INLAND COUNTIES.
Districts.
Wheat. Rye. Barley, Oats.

Wheat. Rye. Barley. Oats.

d. s. d. 8.
1st Essex, 176

8,26
Middlesex,

5147
Kent,

Surrey,

499
Sussex,

6/26
Hertford,

024
2d Suffolk,

Bedford,
Cambridge,

Huntingdon, 176

26 10 21 3d Norfolk, 177

Northampton, 175 4th Lincoln,

Rutland, 176

9 York,

Leicestor,

027
5th Durham,

Nottingham, 180
Northumh.

Derby,
6th Cumberland,

Statlord, 179
Westmorland, 178

Salop,
7th Lancaster, 78

Hereford,
176

6 26
Chester,

Worcester,
9|37 4 99

9 8th Flint,

Warwick,

7/26
Denbigh, 176 10

3 18
Wilts,
178

29 10 22 10 Anglesta, 59

Berks,

6 27
Carnarvon,

Oxford,
Merioneth,

Bucks,

61

6122 9th Cardigan,

Brecon, 168 6138

4116
Pembroke,

Montgonjery, 175
Carmarthen,

Radnor,

27 10/19
Glamorgan,
10th Gloucester, 176 11 29
Somerset,

AVERAGE OF ENGLAND AND
Monmouth,

WALES. 11th Devon,

9 18 6

176 + | 40 5 | 28 9 1 21 7 Cornwall, 12th Dorset,

Hants, 79

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METEOROLOGICAL REGISTER.

From April 26, 10 May 25th, 1816. Kept by C. BLUNT, Philosophical Instrument-maker, 38, Tavistock-st. Covent-Garden

Barometrical Pressure. Temperature Moon. Day. Wind. Max, Min. Mean. Max Min. Mean.

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57'5 Fair

49
43
37
39
38
38
236

39

40

Apr. 26 SE 30:13
27

SE 30:10
25 SE

30 29 SE

30 30 SE

2991 May 1 SE

2974 21 S E 29'89 3 SE

30 41 SW

30 11 5 W

30

2996 W

20.99 W 2971 W

29'82 108 W

2050 11 NE

29:42 12 N E

29:58 13 NW

2978 141 E 29'90 15 SE

29'90 16 SE 29'93 17 E

29 82 15 NE

29.88 19 E

29.98 20 SE

29'90 21 SE

29.97 221 E

29'98 23 SE

29'98 24 S W

29'06 25 S W

29'99

30'12
30
30
3997
20:59
2969
29'82
29'96
30
29.96
2993
29'92
29'68
2980
29'42
2931
29:42
29'02
29.89
29'89
29.83
29'79
29 85
29.85
29'90
29'97
29'07
29'98
29.92
29.92

30-125 09 30'05 67 30

6+ 29'995 66 2971 63 2971 64 29'855 63 29.98 61 30'055 62 29.98 61 29'945 60 29905 60 29971 59 29091 59 29:46 57 29.865 56 29.50 57 29.7 59 29.895 58 29'895 56 29'88

66 29.805) 64 29'865) 60 29'865 60 2909

59 29'07 58 29'975159 29'98 60 29'44 63 29 953 61

38 37 36 36 35 34 35 36 37

50:5 Rain 3:25 Rain 51'5 Rain 51 Rain 49'5

Rain 50 Rain 51 Rain 505 Rain 19

Rain
48-5 Rain
47.5 Rain
45.5 Rain
46 Rain
45 Rain
46 Rain
47.5 Rain
47'5

Rain
48.5 Fair
53 Fair
5105 Fair
49
50 Fair
4895 Fair
46 Fair
475 Fair
49 Rain
5005 Rain
50.5 Rain

Fair

40 39 38 40 38 34 36 38 38 40

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RESULTS OF THE MONTH. Mean barometrical pressure 29•8592 Mean temperature

24.7452 Maximum, 30'13 wind at SE Maximum, 69

wind at SE Minimum, 29'31 wind at NE | Minimum, 34

wind at N E PREVAILING WINDS-NO--NE 3-E 4-SE 13-50-SW 3-W 6-N WI

Alcan Bar, Pres.

Mean Temp From the on the 27th April, to the D on the 4th May 29.898

51755 From the D on the 4t, to the @ on the 11th May

29'837

45'571 Froin the on the 11th May, to the ) on the 19th

29 8

45.5 In answer to the numerous enquiries relative to the best channel for transmitting the New Monthly Magazine to Ireland and Foreign countries, we beg leave to state that it is regularly delivered by the Postmasters in all parts of Europe at Two Guineas per annum, or Oae Guinea for six months, if orders are given, and payment made

To Níí. AUSTIN, General Post Office, London, for Ireland.
To Mr. Cowie, General Post Office, for France, Germany, and Holland,

To Mr. WILLIAM SERJEANT, General Post Office, for the Countries bordering on the Baltic and the Mediterranean, and for Portugal and the Brazils.

To Mr. 'THORNILL, General Post Office, for the West Indies, Bahama, Madeira, Bermud?, and Nova Scotia.

To Mr. Guy, of the East India House, for the Cape of Good Hope, and all parts of India.

ERRATA. Vol. IV. p. 202, col. 1, line 39, for providentially read providently. Vul. V. p. 142, col. 1, line 20, for two volumes read a large double roll; and line 21, for 69

read 169.

Printed by J. Gillet, Crowa Court, Fleet Street, London.

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A TRIP TO PARIS IN AUGUST AND SEP- proportion of the labours of society. TEMBER, 1815.

These almost exclusively manage the (Continued from p. 389.) business of the shops; and they cannot TO form an opinion of the French be too much praised for their unwearied character from thit of the Parisians, industry. Many mother's among them would I think be forming upon a de- do not allow the inselves sufficient leisure fective basis. Besides that at the present to attend to their children, who are sent time a stranger at Paris can hardly be into the country to purse. The women said to live among the French, so much do not confine themselves to the mere is it in the possession of foreigners, the sale of the goods; in the evening, when extent of France contains mo. e than one on account of the lights the inside of nation, and they may be supposed to the shop can be better observed, I have exhibit as many different characters as seen women sitting, making or repairing they do physiognomies. Among the lat- a walch, engraving a senl, besides others ter, I had long before, out of France, engaged upon elegant needle-work. A distinguished one particularly disagree shoemaker, whilst in his shop he takes able to me, and which I met with in the measure of your foot, will call out France for the first time among our pos- the size to his wife, who enters it into tilions. This man's complexion was the order-book.--Such constant occupabrown, with black rugged eye-brows, tion from early in the morning till late black coarse eye-lashes, the nose broad at night, argues at least in favour of the at the bottom, with large nostrils, and character of those females who, from one inclined to turn up, the mouth very large end of the week to the other, are thus with thick lips, the head covered with secured from the temptations which idleblack coarse hair, tied in a queue with a ness furnishes; nor has any thing fallen greasy ribbon. This character probably under my observation tending to the predraws its origin from the more southern judice of the character of this class of provinces. The man was constantly in a females, unless I consider as evidence passion with his horses, or something the sarcastic smiles and significant shrugs else, during the whole stage he drove of men who, without being able to make us. The many fine.countenances among out a case, appear only desirous to make the men, and fair complexions among you believe that they are among the the women, met with in this place, are favourites who are admitted into the arno doubt indigenous to the more northern cana of the boudoirs, though neither che parts of France. Female beauty, as far minds nor persons of these men seem to as it consists in the elegant oval contour possess any thing to recommend them. of the head, symmetrical disposition of -Even the fore part of the Sunday (withthe bones of the face, whiteness and de- out adverting here to the irreligiousness licacy of skin, tinted by the pencil of of this practice) is employed by these health with roseate bue on the cheek and females in the occupations of their shops; crimason on the lips, appears to me, when but the afternoon and evening of that I remember the fair daughters of Albion, day they consider as allotted for their very rare, among the Parisian dames at recreation; they enjoy that opportunity least. The shape of their heads com- to display their fashionable clothes, and monly deviates too much from the ele- to make their observations upon the gant figure of the oval; but where this taste of others. grace is added to the beauties peculiar The custom of females sitting down in to the French lady's face, the result is coffee-houses, and taking their dinner an interest and fascination from the wbole there, I am told, has obtained only since to which only the words je ne sçais quoi the Revolution. This exhibition, how, can be applied.

ever, though novel to us, will appear The women of that class to which much less objectionable when it is conshopkeepers and other tradesmen belong, sidered that these females always come seem to me to bear more than their due attended by one or more gentlemen; New MONTHLY MAG.--No. 30.

VOL. V. 3R

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486 A Trip to Paris in August and September 1815. (July 1, that the appearance of women being no spects, there appears a greater propriety novelty in those places, attracts no no- in the public conduct of the people here tice; and that I'renchmen drink their than in some other countries. No iode light wines with their meals, and do not cent writing or figuring on public buke sit afterwards over their bottles indulg. ings and walls evinces the coarse depr. ing in conversation, which would make vity of the lower classes of the people; it improper for fenalcs to be placed no filthy, no blasphemous oaths, fros within hearing of them. Immediately the mouths of drunken men or women after dinner Frenchmen take their coffee, disgust or alarm the ears of modes: and leave the house for a walk, or a females passing along the streets. The place of public amusement.

play-houses and public places of amuseIt seems to be generally admitted that ment are not occupied by courtesans, as Frenchwomen do not possess that kind by a garrison, whose corps des gardes are of delicacy to which Sterne alludes, in in the lobbies; and the very prostitutes that superior degree which heightens so at their places of rendezvous observe a much the charms of the British fair; and degree of decorum. I have myself observed some ludicrous Paris having ever been a court resia instances of this defect. This appears dence only, an external refinement of to be a strange anomaly in nature, con- manners has been particularly cultivated sidering the degree of taste and elegance here, and naturally diffused itself amoos in their deportment displayed by the the lowest classes of the people, who ladies of France. This delicacy, whose once at least were possessed of the amexistence is on occasions indicated by a bition of being thought polile; whilst Luublustı, or expression of painful emotion, don, being not only a royal residence, but seems to me to be founded in an uncon- at the same time the most important sex scious feeling of the mind of its purer port in the world, must naturally exbabit a nature than that of the body; and any greater admixture of the rough mannen idea which even by association only leads of those who live in habitations floating to a contemplation of the brutish pature upon the ocean. Perhaps there is also of the body, creates a feeling of humi- something in the sturdy mind of these liation from which the unpolluted mind islanders which will not be trimmed and shirinks with aversion. So far I consider tied down by the silken strings of pollethis feeling as expressed by delicacy, ness. Hence the more frequent broals whilst that species of indelicacy more in the streets of London.* If here in properly ternied obscenity, I do not by Paris two Frenchmen run against each any means consider as included in the other, the case must appear at once very charge against French females of the clearly against one of them, if each does better classes. Yet the phenomenon of not take the fault upon himself with a female French artist being seen (as she many apologies. The nature of Frenchwas by me on more than one day) silting men does not lead them to take occasion before, and making a drawing from, a for quarrelling from circumstances like large male statue, totally naked, cannot

The ingenious writer will allow us to be concealed, as it was seen by hundreds subjoin one remark in favour of our fellow who visited the gallery of the Louvre at citizens. We are confident that whoever wil the same time. This, and some other take the trouble to walk through the priae. exhibitions I witnessed, prove an unac- pal streets of the metropolis--for instance, countable want of a sense of propriety ihe great line of communication by Cheapand decency, from which in other coun- side, Ludgate-hill, Fleet-street, the Strzed, tries the most lascivious propensities &c.-on a fine Sunday evening in sumner, would be inferred to prevail; but here will need no other evidence to refute the in neither the individual seems to be con- sinuation that the people of London are of a scious of such connexion, nor do other quarrelsome disposition. For our own parts symptoms prove the existence of such we have often witnessed with admiration be propensities, por do the people of this order, the decorum-nay, almost the sience

which, from the absence of carriages a country seem to suspect thein as necessarily existing with such conduct. It such times, forces itself upon the observa

tion-athat prevail among the crowds of pete must appear strange that the French on

soos returning to their homes, many of these their part should charge the English with

at least with spirits exhilarated by the induswant of a sense of delicacy, in being

gence of an extra pint or glass of liquor. entertained with, instead of being shocked

Nothing can in our opinion speak more at, the indecencies and vulgarities of strongly than this scene in behalf of the many of their favourite plays. With all peaceable disposition of the inhabitants of this it must be allowed that, in many re- the British metropolis. -EDITOR.

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