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386 A Trip to Paris in August and September 1815. (Jude 1, tite courts before these grand mansions; gcáson, 'towards the evening, you may which for the most part are built upona bere see passing waggon-loads of chairs, large scale, and furnished in an elegant brought liither to be placed chiefly on the and splendid manner. Tlie parts ad space between the houses and the footjoining to this quarter, drawing towards ways. These are soon occupied by a the cathedral of Notre Dame, are as bad crowd of loungers, chiefly well dressed as the opposite side for the narrowness females, whose only amusement is to sit and dirtiness of the streets. But the there quietly to gaze and to be gazed af; grand and extensive view which presents whilst from the rest orateurs and conitself to a spectator placed on one of the fectioners the customers issue in great bridges over the Seine, may well fill his numbers to increase the throng on the mind with wonder and deliglit. As far footpaths under the trees. Beyond one as the eye can reach to his right and left of these Boulevards is a new quarter of he beholds the wide parades or quays the town called the Chaussée d'Astin, along each side of the broad bed of the consisting chiefly of houses inhabited by Seine, crossed by numerous bridges, what are called genteel people, and to biek crowded below with baths, boats, and were built it is said with assignats when washing places. On bis right the view they were obliged to be taken at par. terminates with the towers of the church Paris has no squares to be compared of Notre Dame ; before bim extends it- with those of Landon for size and nonself the fine edifice of the Louvre, and ber, unless the Place Louis XV. be the immensely long gallery connecting it reckoned ainong them. This is a traly with the Tuileries; then the gardens of grand place: one side of it being formed the Tuileries delight his eye, immediately by the gardens of the Tuileries, the or connected in appearance with the posite side by the Champs Elysées, a third Champs Elysées, whose rich foliage side by a bridge over the Seine, end the stretches along the Seine till the perspec. Palais Bourbon, of most elegant architive is bounded by the horizon. If the tecture, and the fourth by the-Garde spectator turns round be sees on the other meuble, two beautiful buildings on each shore of the Seine the same spacious - side of the fine Rue royale, through qanys, and the fine buildings of the which you will also have a view of a French Institute, the Mint, the house of fine palace, begon un the opposite the king's body guard, and the palace of side of the Rue faubourg St. Honoré. the Legion of Honour, near which a new when it shall be finished. The Plore palace has been begun. The Palais Vendome is a square about the size of Bourbon on this same side stands too far Soho Square, the houses of stone, and off, and too much in profile, to improve good architecture. In the centre of this this view by its uncommonly elegant place stands the famous coluinn erected architecture.

by Buonaparte in commemoration of the Next to this scene in interest and war which began with the breaking op beauty must be reckoned the Boulevards. of the French army from Boulogne, and These divide the original cown of Paris terminated with the battle of Austerlitz, froin the Fuubourgs (euburbs). They the principal events of which are per are a road of great breadth, paved in the corded by basso-relievos on brass plates middle, several miles in length, like the made of the cannon taken, and placed on New and City Roads of London. The a spiral line round this coluinn' from the houses on each side of this road are of bottom to the top. The Place des Vio stone, and for the most part of elegant toires is a square perhaps of about the or grand architecture, like private gentle- saine size, but not so handsome, as that Quen's livuses, yet interspersed with nu- just mentioned. The Carousel may also merous shops, coffee-bouses, restauruo be considered as a public place, samuted teurs, pablic gardens, and other places of in front of the Palace of the Táilertes, resort. Between these houses and the which will be greatly increased in gratroad there is a very wide space, with one deur if the iinprovenients begun in the or more rows of trees on each side, be- neighbourhood by Buonaparte should be sides a sufficient interval between the finished. trees and rlie lrouses for stalls with fruit, The gardens of the Tuileries, only part flowers, prints, books; small booths for of which is laid out in the stiff French tonding newspapers, awnings before the taste, the Chanips Elysées, and the garcoffee-houses for the same purpose; both dens of the Luxembour', the Pean Rothe riad nnd the footways exhibiting yal, and Jardins des Planles, as places of all day long the most busy and entertain public resort, with their conveniences of ing scenie inagioable. During the mild chairs, newspapers, refreshmeats, &t.

1816.) A Trip to Paris in August and September 1815. 387 give Paris an advantage over London for most elegantly fitted up with alternate those who have much time to spend in pier-glasses, and fasces of spears, painted sucl places. If a Parisienne of quality and gilt, surmounted by gilt belmets were to be led a-walking up and down with plumes. Hic GAUDET BELLICOSA Hyde Park or Kensington Gardens for VIRTOS is written on the fan-light over several hours without sitting down she the door. The 'lables in these houses would think herself abimée. Whilst the are generally of an ioferior red French Parisians have the advantage in places of marble, easily cleaned, and comfortable this kind, they are on the other hand de- enough in this warm season. The prac. prived of the entertainm.int which the tice of waiters being paid by the cusconvenient pavement of London allows toniers, as well as that of the masters the foot-passenger to enjoy anong an charging exorbitantly, has been intro endless variety of shops m all parts of duced here by such of the English as that extensive metropolis. In Paris the have more money than wit, and who want of such a pavement and the danger used to exclaim: How monstrous cheap to wbici the foot-passenger is exposed, if it is! a hint that was not lost upon not of being run over, at least of being Monsieur le restaurateur, nor upon the splashed from head to foot by the car. bouliquiers male and female. These no riages driving through the dirty gutters sooner observe by the cut of your clothes in the middle of the streets, prevents that you come from England, than their well dressed women from venturing on only apprehension is dealing with you foot into these streets, which is one of appears to be that they may not ask or the causes of the difference between the charge enough. “ Pay! what you are appearance of the people in the streets accustomed to pay,” said a French haitof Paris und of London, to the great ad- dresser to me, evidently under this apvantage of the latter place. In and prehension, when I asked bim what I about the Palais Royal, the rue St. Ho- had to pay. An attempt to make pure noré, rue Vivienne (the Paris Bond chases in the shops myself, without the street), &e. there is some attempt at the assistance of a Parisian friend, I was external decoration of the shops, and soon obliged to relinquish. The few some of their signs are paintings by the shops wbere they pretend not to ask bands of no mean artists; but in the more than they will take have written other parts of the town the neglect of the on the windows: Prix fixe. shopkeepers in this point produces a very The lighting of the streets by lanthorns sombre appearance. The principal suspended in the middle by ropes has an éclat among these shops is produced by unpleasant, unfinished appearance; yet those for gilt clocka, of which there is a these glass lanthorns are furnished with very considerable one in the Passage du several lamps and foe oil, and are due Panoruma, making a most splendid ap- merous enough to give sufficient light in pearance by candle-light.

these narrow streets. How the peace The coffee.houses, and public dining and safety of these streets is preserved rooms at the restaurateurs are decorated during the night, must appear extraordi. with, a splendour, of which the dark and nary to a stranger who is used to the puneglected inside of a Parisian's home merous watchmen, such as they are, in may be either cause or effect. One the streets of Londow, whilst none are to would imagine that all Paris dioed every be seen bere;. yet all the time that I bave day from home, so much are these innu- been in Paris, I have heard of zo street merable public victualling places resorted robbery, witnessed no riots, quarrels, or to throughout the whole day. Certainly disturbances, but what were made by foat the present time the host of foreign reigw drunken soldiers. The guardians troops adds to the population much of of the streets of Paris are the national that particular class of people who dine guards, who have their guard houses in from home. The profusion of large different districts, called arrondissements; looking-glasses, of gilt clocks, and gold these are in every respect hetter calcuintroduced into the painting of the rooms lated for such a service, only: it would may well surprise a traveller coming seem that much mischief might be done from wealthy Britain, where heavy, taxa- before they could arrive at the spot, as I tion checks all profusion, in these expen- never met with any patroling the streets. sive articles in similar public places. The inhabitants of Paris are certainly In the Caffe du Regent, the whole length indebted to Buonaparte for many imof the wall facing the street appears like provements made by him in their town, one looking-glass, from top to bottom. useful as: tvek: as ornamental. He reThe Caffé militaire, though out large, is moved the carcase-butchers from the in

386 A Trip to Paris in August and September 1815. (June 1, terior to the skirts of the place, where government pays something towards the he built slaughter-houses for them called support of these people, who serve to abattoirs. Many of these are used by amuse the public of Paris. the foreign troops for hospitals, and the There are several newspapers published plan and arrangement of these abattoirs daily in Paris. They afford, no doubt, are considered as the best basis for any sonic entertainment to those who feel an hospital to be erected upon, principally interest in the domestic and foreign powith regard to cleanliness. The vendors litics of this nation, but they are desti of old clothes and rags have also teen tute of those numerous other ingredients removed near to the spot where the that render a London paper to EnglishTemple formerly stood. Here a large men as indispensable an article as their hall has been constructed in the form of tea; fortunaiely they can meet with a open barns, pervious to the air from all sufficient supply here of that necessary sides. The new canal d'Ourque, like- of life, and also of English magazines wise begyn by Buonaparte, is to furnish and pamphlets, of which the greatest Paris with wholesome water, and to supply is met with in the large reading serve also for cleansing the streets. At room of M. Gaglignani, in the rue Vipresent they use no other water here vienne, whilst Bovillier's rooms in the than that of the Seine after it has been rue Richelieu are their principal resort filtered; the spring water not being fit to for good eating and wines. drink, owing to the chalk through which The difference in the manner of living, it passes. The tanpers he had not been between the English and French, is well able to remove from the vicinity of a ri- known. Soup, an indispensable article vulet which falls into the Seine beyond here at every dinner; vegetables stewed ; the Jardin des Plantes, where they snake meat in small pieces dressed in a bundred the air very unwholesome. Even the different ways; no large joints, except a numerous sisterhood of washerwomen leg of multon; good poultry, roasted have not escaped Napoleon's notice. soinetimes, but too much so; game; These are subject to early decrepitude good sallad; fine fruit, and wine, after and mortality, from exercising their trade you become ased to it, besides confecconstautly in cold water on the Seine, tionary, and good coffee, bread, with and in positions very injurious to their plenty of eggs, form the characteristics healtlı,

of French living; whilst water, alone or l'aris is not, as it appears to me, so mixed with wine, is drunk instead of roucla infested with beggars as London, beer. The water, as well as the wine, is nor are the passenger's eyes bere shocked iced in the present warm season. with the exhibitions of all kinds of human With all these good things, and inndeformities by wbich he is annoyed in merable places of public amusement, in London. On the Boulevards you see a fine climate, it might be supposed that towards evening a class of solicitors of a man might live here very bappily; pet charity called pauvres honteuses. They are there many most substantial and are decently dressed women, having their essential things wanting. Besides the faces covered with a veil or a liandker- appearance of a scanty diffusion of prochief, as if from their situations in life perty through the classes of people below they were ashamed to beg; they appear the higher ranks, and of ihe comforts sonietimes as mothers with one or two and decencies arising therefrom, and children; however, the trick, as I am the want of solidity and independence in insorined, no longer succeeds so well as the characters of individuals, an irksonie it did at first. Iwo soldiers attracted meayreness in their conversation is feli iny. notice, playing and singing in the by a man habituated to the society in street. One of them had lost his right England, unless it be among inen of sciarm, yet by having the bow fastened to ence and literature, who form a distinct his left side, and with his left hand draw- class; but as to the real business of life, ing the fiddle along it, hic nuade out a there is inore knowledge and just coulpretty tolerable tune, and iustead of an ception diffused ainong the middling indecent or political ballad they sung a classes in England, than here, or perhaps religious legendary tale in verse, tending any where else. The French nation 10 show the good effects of religion; scem to form only one immense circle, Iliough they have bere also their singers of which their government is the centre, of political and amorous ballads, and to which every thing converges, from criers of newspapers, and strolling musi- which everything emanates; whilst chans playing at the doors of coffee- the, English move in a thousand oirhousesy- &c. I have been told that the cles round their own particular ceu

386

vernment.

1816.] Mr. Sharp on Experiments with Bottles sunk in the ocean. tres, and she whole with planetary or revolutionists - ran into the other es der royolve round the general centre of treme. the national interest and the govern- Stulti dum vitia vitant, in contraria currunt. ment. In this place you hear of none of The scum of society was now to have, those numerous meetings daily called an essential participation in the governtogether in England, for the purpose of ment. This is also gone by, and it' it has the speculative advantage of the indivi- left a visible effect on the 'manners of duals so convened, in the first instance, the inferior classes of the people here." but ultimately for the benefit of the na- among whom there are many who would tion, much less of meetings of such indi- have rudeness pass for liberty, the Revoviduals who are linked together by some lution cannot be said, on the other hand, political sentiment, by attachinent to not to have introduced any good change somne public character, or even by the whatever. It cannot but be consoling endearing recollection of early con to every friend of the human species to nexions formed at some public institu- observe the dawn of a better' state of". tion for the education of youth. Public things in France. The trial by jury may spirit is the blood that should pervade be considered as the first school where the arteries and veins of a free constitu- the young Frenchman is called upon by tion; it is of slow creation ; it was so in his country to exercise a most important Eogland, and if it cannot be ultimately function, on which the property, way, the furnished by the French nation, they life of his fellow creature depends. I must return to their former absolute mo have witnessed this noble function exer. narchy.

cised here at Paris to my grtatest satisAmong the governinents more or less faction; it was on occasion of the trial absolute upon the continent, the best of a woman charged with having droirned treat their subjects as children who are her own sister. The ability of the judge not supposed either to hare a right or a in summing up the evidence, pointing capacity to meddle with matters of go- out the interest which the prisoner could

These subjects are early have in committing the crime, the beartaught this lesson, and are made to con- ing, the defect, and strength of the evitemplate with distant awe and surprise dence brought for and against the pri. the wonderful operations of their govern- soner, the talents of the attorney-general ment, who without ceremony take the in opening the prosecution, and of the money of the subjects out of their pock- counsel for the prisoner, together with ets, without deigning to give them any the decorum observed by a multitude of account of its application. Such blind spectators during the trial, left nothing submission tends to repress if not to ex to be wished for. When the jury with tinguish the noblest of human feelings,. drew to consider of the verdici, the awful -self-respect,—the only shield against suspense in which the prisoner was placed the temptation to baser crimes, where impressed on my mind a serious feeling; secresy promises iinpuvity. These go- but a group of French ladirs, adunated vernments, by drawing so narrow a cir- into the inner court like myself, tell. imcle round the few individuals who share mediately into a lively cbat, as between in it, to the exclusion of the talents and the acts of a play. Another institution, knowledge of a great part of the nation, to which the Revolution has given rise, is not only deprive themselves of the aid of the assembly of the grand untional counthese auxiliaries, but render themselves cils, whose discussions of the most imincapable of acquiring a true knowledge portant measures will afford to the roung of those whom they govern, and of man- Frenchman an opportunity to exercise kind in general, as may be easily per- and improve his. judgment, and will ceived by any man of observation on en- recal him from the pursuits of egotism tering a circle of continental diplomatists and frivolity to employ his talents, stimu-, belonging to such governments. Under lated by an honorable emulation for the the French government before the Revo- benefit of his country. Jution nothing seemed to be respected

(To be continued.) but nobility, titled courtiers, and priests, or soldiers. How, in such a state, could MR. EDITOR, the inast useful classes of society rise in

IN

your Magazine for this months, I the estimation of others and of them see a letter from - W. M. RETLAS, reselves? The Revolution overturned this questing to be informed ifi anyut your system; , but being begun in violence scientific correspondents can give any, and ignorance of the true nature of goe' or what, satisfactoryconclusions respecto cemment upon principles of liberty, the ing the experiments of the Rev. Dr.

388 A Trip to Paris in August and September 1815. (Jane 1, terior to the skirts of the place, where government pays something towards the he built slaughter-houses for them called support of these people, who serve to abattoirs. Many of these are used by amuse the public of Paris. the foreigu troops for hospitals, and the There are several newspapers published plan and arrangeinent of these abattoirs daily in Paris. They afford, no doubt, are considered as the best basis for any some entertainment to those who feel an hospital to be erected upon, principally interest in the domestic and foreign powith regard to cleanliness. The vendors litics of this nation, but they are dest: of old clothes and rags have also teen tute of those numerous other ingredients removed near to the spot where the that render a London paper to English Temple formerly stood. Here a large men as indispensable an article as their hall has been constructed in the form of tea; fortunaiely they can meet with a open barns, pervious to the air from all sufficient supply here of that necessary sides. The new canal d'Ourque, like- of life, and also of Englisb magazines wise begun by Buonaparte, is to furnish and pamphilets, of which the greatest Paris with wholesome water, and to supply is met with in the large reading serve also for cleansing the streets. At room of M. Gaglignani, in the rue Vipresent they use no other water here tienne, whilst Bovillier's rooms in the than that of the Seine after it has been rue Richelieu are their priucipal resort ħltered; the spring water not being fit to for good eating and wines. drink, owing to the chalk through which The difference in the manner of living, it passes. The tanpers he had not been between the English and French, is we!! able to remove from the vicinity of a ri- known. Soup, an indispensable article vulet which falls into the Seine beyond here at every dinner; vegetables stewed; the Jardin des Plantes, where they snake meat in small pieces dressed in a bundred the air very unwholesome. Even the different ways; no large joints, except a numerous sisterhood of washerwomen leg of mution; good poultry, roasted have not escaped Napoleon's notice. soinetimes, but too much so; gamé; These are subject to early decrepitude good sallad; fine fruit, and wine, after and mortality, from exercising their trade you become used to it, besides confecconstantly in cold water on the Seine, iionary, and good coffee, bread, with and in positions very injurious to their plenty of eggs, form the characteristics healılı.

of French living; whilst water, alone or l'aris is not, as it appears to me, so mixed with wine, is drunk instead of rouch infested with beggars as Loudon, beer. The water, as well as the wine, is nor are the passenger's eyes bere shocked iced in the present warm season. with the exhibitions of all kinds of human With all these good things, and innt deformities by which he is annoyed in merable places of public ainusement, in London. On the Boulevards you see a fine climate, it might be supposed that towards evening a class of solicitors of a man miglit live here very happily; yet charity called pauvres honteuses. They are there many most substantial and are decently dressed women, having their essential things wanting. Besides the faces covered with a veil or a handker- appearance of a scanty diffusion of prochief, as if from their situations in lite perty through the classes of people below they were ashamed to beg; they appear the higher ranks, and of ihe comforts sonietimes as mothers with one or two and decencies arising therefrom, and children; however, the trick, as I am the want of solidity and independence in injorined, no longer succeeds so well as the characters of individuals, an irksome it did at first. Two soldiers attracted meayreness in their conversation is feli iny notice, playing and singing in the by a man babituated to the society in street. One of them had lost his right England, unless it be among men of sciarm, yet by having the bow fastened to ence and literature, who form a distinct his left side, and with his left hand draw- class; but as to the real business of life, ing the fiddle along it, be nuade out a there is anore knowledge and just conpretty tolerable tune, and iustead of an ception diffused ainong the middling indecent or political ballad they sung a classes in England, than here, or perhaps religious legendary tale in verse, lending any where else. The French nation' to show the good effects of religion ; scem to form only one immense circle, though they have bere also their siugers of which their government is the centre, of political and amorous ballads, and to which every thing converges, from criers of newspapers, and strolling in usi- wbic! every tbing emanates; whilst cians playing at the doors of coffee the Englisti move in a thousand cir houses;-&c. I have been told that the cles round their own particular ceur

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