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DILY PRICES OF STOCKS, FROM FEB. 26, 1815, TO MARCH 25, 1816, BOTH INCLUSIVE.
Days.
Bank 3 per Ct. 3 per Ct.4 perCt. 5 per Ct. Long Irish 3 per Ct Imp.

India So. SealO.S.S. New S. 5 per Ct.

3* per Dy 1916. Stock. Redu. Consols. Cons. Navy. Anns. per Ct Imp. Anns. Omnium. Stock. Stock. Anns. Sea An. Ind. Bon. Ex. Bills for Ac. Tick Feb. 26 250 1802 1377 003

602 184 pr. 182

58 pr. 48 pr. 28 dis. 62 27 251 2.62 14 62 1377 904 153 12

181 173 pr, 182 1 15 664

3 12 dis. 5 pr. 62 12
28
$ 613 *177

182

3 pr. par.

2. 3
29 2513
61 778 7903 153

603
182 1

2

1 62% Mar. 1 251 361 771 690$ 803154

182

61 2
4 pr. 2

162
2
61
77 $90 90.158

013 12

62 4 (251 2501613 77

181

5 2 3 162 5 251 250614 773 690

1809 181

3 6 2 1 62 6

61 907 178 pr.

3 1 7

61 90 91

5 3

1 pr. 2 pr. 1624 8

61 1902 91 605 17. pr.

3

1 pr. 3 dis. 162
190$
91

6

3 dis. 2 pr. 102
11
90$ 90

3 3 62 1
12

90 90 2 10 pr.

2

par. 02 13

61 902 18 17 pr.

3 par. 624 14

613
00

60%
173

1 2 13 pr. 3 dis. 624
15
613

17

par. 1

4 dis. par. 62
16

609
17

1 pr. par.

4

par. 62 1

i pr. 024 904 90

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3 02 20

0 90 89

par. 1

par. 62
21
61,00

i dis. 615 603
22
604 504 68 89
503 143 15 pr.

par. 1

5 1 60 61
23
89, 89
155 pr.

par. 1

5 1
25
896

5 dis. par. 60 14

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All Excheques Bills, dared prior to the month of January, 1815, have been advertised to be paid off, and the Interest thereon has ceased.

N. B. The me Table contains he highest and lowest prices, taken from the Course of the Exchange, &c, originally published by John Castaign, in the year 1912, and ublished, every muesdug and Friday, under the authority of the Committee of the Stock Exchange, by

JAMES WETENHALL, Slock-Broker, No. 7, Capel court, Bartholoinew-lane, London,

On application to whom, the original documents for sour a century past may be read.

1816.)

[287]

AGRICULTURAL REPORT.

THE humid unsettled state of the atmosphere, through nearly the whole of last month, has very much impeded the early spring sowing, which may probably verify the old adage. that Beans soun in a flood, will come up like a wood. A wei March is not an appropriate season for the improved agriculture of this country.

The young wheats in the northern counties have suffered so much, either from the late period in which the seed is deposited, or from the unfavourable weather, hat they scarcely have the appearance of whear, and in many places cannot be distinguished from the fallows

On the free percolating subsoils in the milland and southern counties there is a very promising plant,

The barley lands upon stiff loams work very clung and unkind. If the weather should continue dry, the barley of this summer will in many situations be of two growths.

Turnips, cabbages, and all the brassica tribe, having suffered so much from the changeable severity of the weather, has caused heavy draughi from the hay tack, which can only be obviated by the great breadths and promising state of the soiling crops.

The backward state of the bud and blossom promises fair for a fruitful season.

unsown.

CORN EXCHANGE, MARCH 18.-Wheat, 455, 10 715.-Rye, 235. to 315.-Barley, 205. to 288.-Malt, sos. to 615.-Oats, 145. to 265.-Flour, Fine, 50s. to 555. ; Seconds, 458. to 50S.

SMITHFIELD MARKET, MARCH 22.-Beef, 4s. Od. to 5s. Od – Mutton, 45. od. to 5s. od. -Vcal, 45, 4d. to 6s. od.-Pork, 45, 4d. to 5s, 6d. per stone of 8 lbs.

Hay, 31. to sl. os.-Straw, 11. 55. od. to il. 1$s.-Clover, 41. to 61. 10s.

Hops, New Pockets.-Kent, 6l. 155. to ul. 45.-Sussex, 61. os, tv sl. os.--Essex, 71, to 10l, os.-Farnham, ill. to 161. 16s.

Average Prices of Corn,

By the Quarter of Eight Winchester Bushels, from the Returns received in the Week ended

March 23, 1816.

d. s.

36

18

6118

9:6

019

9/20

INLAND COUNTIES.
Wneat. Rye. Barley. Oats.

d. s. d. 8. d. Middlesex, 36 11132 084

612 10 Surry,

57 0130 0.4 10+ Hertford, 135 6130 02+ 0.21 Bedford, 53 10139 021

4 Huntingdon, 19 6

20

10 Nortirempton, 51

0 20

2013 8 Rutland, 52 3

017 6 Leicester,

0 23 0:17
Nottingham, :55

432 021 4.19
Derby,
53 7

919 10 Stattord, 58 9

29 0.18 1 Salop,

54 6 38

8,25 10 18 Hereford, 50 9128 88+

9/18 Worcester,

53 032 096 gli8 11 Warwick,

5

C3

4:21
Wilts,
51 4

21 8 19 0 Berks,

59 61 00 221
Oxford, 51 6

121 619
Bucks,
5+ 1

123 2:20
Brecon,

1138 * 25 512 Montgomery, 100 038 5109 518 Railaor, 54

-|2017 318

MARITIME COUNTIES.
Districts.

Wheat. Rye. Barley. Oa:s.
S. d. s.

d. Ist Essex, 15+ 100

0123 9,81 . Kent,

56 023 6129 3.98 0 Sussex,

6 ed Suffolk,

56

21 618 2 Cambridge,

50 9129 020 2115 5 34 Norfolk, 52

8.16 4th Lincola,

18 30 091 11114 9 York,

32 939 7+ 816 + 5th Durham, 152 31

31 4 19 0 Northumh. 151 11 40

7:18 3 Otis Cumberland,

56

B/20 10.16 6 Westmorland, 66 1 32 0124 017 10 7th Lancaster, 59 91

3 Chester,

28 015 0
8th Flint,
51 0

6
Denbigh,
50

25 3/16
Anglesea, 53

20
6110

6
Carnaiyon,
59

29 0 16 6
Merioneth, 58 61

29 10 20 0 gth Cardigan,

53 61 20 0.10 5
Pembroke,

17 81 9 4
Carmarthed,
18

19 5.10) 1
Glamorgan,
56 6

03

0 10th Gloucester, 55 5

18

25

716

9 20 8 Somers to 59

25 214 8 Mon.noutlı, 157 2

5 10 11th Desan, 162

29 4 13 11 Cornwalt, 163 9

23 0.15 0 59 1

i 19 0 5+ 3

3:19. 9

AVERAGE OF ENGLAND AND

WALES. 1 | 54 8( 32 6 | 236 | 17

Hath Dorset,

Hants,

[ 288 )

METEOROLOGICAL REGISTER,

From Feb. 25, lo March 26, 1816. Kept by C. BLUNT, Philosophical Instrument-maker, 38, Tavistock-st. Covent Garden.

Moon. Day

Baromeliical Pressure. Temperature
Wind. Max. Min. Mean. Max Min. Mean.

49 48 47 47

Feb. 26

27 W
28 N

29 N
Mar. 1 N

2 SW 3) SE 4 NW

NW

27 25 26 26 28 29

50

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41 48 48

49

29.98 29.94 29.90
29.98 29 94 2904
29.97 29'91 29'97
29.98 29.97 29 97
299 29 91 29 95
29 93 29 90 2991
29 90

29'88 29.89
29.86 29 80
2971 2948 2959
29'46 2940 2943
29.40 20:36 29 38
2925 29'20 29.22
29*26 2014 2920
29:39 29'29 29.34
2970 2940 29:55
30'26 30'10

30:18
30:30 30'25 427
30 60 30'40 30150
29.80 29'70 2945
29.58 2y56

29:57
29•62 29.60 29*60
29'80 29*70 2975
29.95 29'9029993
30* 30* 3010
3020 30 30*
80 26 30'24 30*25
30:28 30 25 30-27
30:24 3019 30.21
30:20 30*17 30*18
30:21 3018 30*20

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30

38

Fair
36.5 Fa
36'5 Fair
36'5 Fair
38 5 Fair
395 Fair
40 Fair
37'5 Snow
40-5 Snow
44'5 Fair
42 Rain
41 Rain
42'5 Rain
42'5 Fair
445 Fais
445 Rain
43.5 Fair
43 Rain
43 Rain

Rain
45 Rain
45

|Fair 44'5 Fair 4405

Rain 43:3 Rain 43

Fair
42

Fair
42 Cloudy

Fair
41.5 Fair

46 17 49 51 52 51 52 52 53 54 53 51 51

27 33 40 36 36 38 36 38 37 36 34 34 35 36 37 38 38 37 36 35 34 35 35

50

50 49 50 49 48

.

.

.

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RESULTS OF THE MONTH.
Mean barometrical pressure

29.86
| Mean temperature

417 Maximum, 30 60 wind at W Maximum, 54

wind at NW Minimum, 29'14 wind at SE | Minimum, 25

wind at W PREVAILING WINDS-N 2-NEO-E1-SE 5-S1-SW 6-W 8-NW 7

Moan Bar, Pres. Mean Temp. From the 03 ilie 201h Feb, to the on the 28th

30'08

40'12 From the on the 28th Feb, to the D on the 7th March 2974

39'67 From the D on the 7th March to the on the 13th

29'02

43'08 From the on the 13th, to the ) on the 20th

29987

.

In answer to the numerous enquiries relative to the best channel for transmitting the New
Monthly Magazine to Ireland and Foreign countries, we beg leave 10 state that is is regu-
larly delivered by the Postmasters in all parts of Europe at Two Guineas per annum, oi One
Guinea for six months, if orelers are given, and payment made

To Mr. AUSTIN, General Post Office, London, for Ireland.
To Mr. Crwil, General Post Office, for France, Germany, and Holland.

To Mr. WILLIAM SERJEANT, General Post Office, for the Countries bordering on the Baltic and ihe Mediterranean, and for Portugal and the Brazils.

To M.. THORH11 L., General Post Office, for the West Indies, Bahama, Madeira, Bermuda, and Nova Scotia.

To Mr. Guy, of the East India House, for the Cape of Good Hope, and all parts of India.

Printed by J. Gillet, Crown Court, Fleet Street, Londoo.

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A TRIP TO PARIS IN AUGUST AND SEP- darker. I now perceived niany such TEMBER 1815.

lights in different directions, and was Paris, August, 1815. told that they proceeded trom the waves WE sailed from Dover about one along the shore. This phenomenon o'clock in the afternoon; other packets soon presented itself in all its splendour, had left the harbour two hours before, as we neared the land. The waves, as whilst we were obliged to wait for the they reached the shore, and were turned, Paris mail coming from London. It was emitted from their edges a brilliant like an afternoon's sailing on a lake, só light, just as if a train of gas-lighis were smootb wis the sea. Not having ever instantaneously lighted along a line of been in France before, I looked with several miles, and as suddenly extin. eagerness towards the shore of the new guished, to be renewed again as rapidly. land, to make out its form and colour. The sea continued smooth, and the lights ing, and now and then turned my eyes of the South Foreland were distinctly back to the coast of England, as if be seen twinkling like a cluster of stars, tween these opposite shores some diffe. Our boatmen now seemed to consult, rence might be discovered aoalogous to with great seriousness, about the safest the great difference between the nations, place to put our boat upon the sands, by which they are inhabited. Nature which they always contrive to do in sufseemed to favour my fancy; over France ficient depth of water, to require the the sky appeared bright and gay, whilst assistance of their townsmen to carry the the cliffs of England were shrouded in a passengers on shore. Now you might dark mantle, through which the setting behold through the darkness of the night sun presented a red, broad, fiery orb, the forms of men in long procession, idround which the dark clouds alternately vancing with a strange noise towards closed, and broke into fantastic forms,- our boat, whilst streans of light trailed a grand, interesting spectacle, which at- from their naked legs, as they furrowed tracted the notice of all the passengers.

the water. I was directed by two of The packets that had sailed before us, them near me, to place my thighs on had arrived in Calais barbour about five their shoulders, but in our passage o'clock, whilst both wind and tide failed through the water, I found that one of burs at eight, four miles from Calais. the men was much shorter than the Several muskets were fired, and other other, which placed ine in such a situasignals made by our captain, for the tion, that I could not have endured it a boatmen of Calais to come to our vessel. moment longer, when they put me down At last, when it was almost dark, a on the sand. I fortunately found mylarge boat came alongside of us. Seve- self in company with two passengers, ral ladies and their friends preferred who resided at Calais; these led me over remaining in the packet all night; the the sands to a place where we had to boat put ott with the other passengers, clamber up a broken ladder, to get upon including myself. An old man sat at the pier, and after stumbling in the the helm of this boat, calling out fre- dark over the ropes with which the ships quently to the rowers, Tirez fort! (pull were fastened, we arrived at the Cushard,) at which they often seemed af- tom-house. This, by the light of only fronted. The rowers, when putting their a lanthorn, appeared like a den of bancars into the water, rose from their seats ditti, where several men were lying on and fell back upon them, as they made sacks on the ground. the pull

. I imagined from the beginning these, one grotesque figure rose yawn: that I saw the lights in the houses of ing, and being informed that we had Calais, but soon discovered my mistake. left our baggage on board the packet, The water, as it was turned up by the allowed us to proceed to the town, and oars, emitted a silvery light, which in- I arrived at Dessin's (now Quillac's). creased in brilliancy, as the night grew hotel betiséen eleven and twelve at night. New MONTHLY MAG-No. 28.

Voi, V.

2P

From anong

2

290 A Trip to Paris in August and September 1815. (May 1,

Not having been in a hed since I left the cracking of his whip, to their last my own in London, wlien I awoke in effort, to drag, in some degree of style the inorving at Calais, I had no recol into the yard, a heavy, old, crazy, and lection of the journey I had undertaken, jolting vehicle, which has not been and was astonished, when I looked up cleaned, because, as Swift's groom obto the top of the lofty curtains hang- served, it would soon grow dirty again. ing from the very high ceiling in form Anon in comes, galloping and cracking of a throne; but soon coming to my his whip, some dapper foreign courier

, recollection, I said to myself: I am in full of the consequence of the dispatches France.

be has in his wallet. Yonder you see a Who, but those who have had the group of strange figures about an elegant evidence of their own senses, could English carriage, to which a set of poor believe, that so great a difference should looking French horses are harnessed exist between two shores in sight of each with dirty ropes; whilst some tall meaother, as is exhibited here between gre dark figures in great coats, black England and France? The English tra- stocks, and immense cocked hats arę veller is surprised at almost every thing, stalking about the yard, like ghosts of that surrounds bim-the lofty ceilings departed heroes of former times. of the bed rooms; bed-curtains fixed to Among the idle spectators in the yard, the wainscot almost at the height of the there was a figure, nothing like to ceilings, terminating in a covering like which to be met with 00 English the canopy of a throne ; stone Noors ground; between two hollow caverned even on the upper stories; immense eyes a large aquiline nose projected from chimnies yawning at him in an almost under a cocked hat, so old, so greasy, circular form, adorned, or rather de rusty, and cracked, that no beggar formed, by heavy marble scrolls of a would pick it up in London streets. sombre colour, baving still in them the There was a martial air about this little einders of last winter, between two iron man, and there might be the soul of bars to support the wood, which are another Buonaparte in him, undeveloped faced with brass ornaments, that appear by favourable circumstances. not to have been scoured since they Taking a walk into the market place, were made; ponderous frames, wit' I observed in the middle of it, where bad wavy glass in the lofty windows; generally a fountain or column is found, antique chests of drawers, or Chinese a short, lusty man, standing leaning on cabiners out of repair; shallow wash- bis bands and stick placed behind him. hand hasons without soap, except in The contour and lineaments of his face, some English hotels; stone stairs with and outlines of his shape proved better fron balustrades. These, however, to- than the best affidavit could have done, gether with the stone floors, provide an that the man was an Englisbman. No excellent security against the spreading sooner did I approach him, than he of a fire, whilst the construction of the greeted me with an “how d'ye do Sir? generality of the houses in England, here is a fine place for an Englislimon to promotes the conflagration to the an- come to .!He proved to be a tradesman nual destruction of so many valuable of mine in London. The observation of lives. The modern ornaments in these this short fat lover of good beef and porlarge rooms consist principally of fine ter, certainly went to the reprobation of gilt clocks, large pier glasses, paper the whole place; yet he accompanied it hangings with landscapes, buildings and with such looks of good humour, that figures, and pictures, of which nymphis the words lost half the severity of their and cupids generally form the subject. satirical nieaning.

Not so the great Dessin's hotel is known to be built man froin London, whom I met stepping upon a considerable scale, forming a across the yard at Dessin's, and whom large square yard. This yard presents as an acquaintance, I bade welcome in a good epitome of the carriages and France. With the taciturnity belong postilions of most parts of France, and ing to such a great man, he replied with the contrast between them and the Eng- a pantomimical gesture, which drew his Iish carriages. Here you may see a tall eyes, shoulders, and hands in unison fellow in immense boots (his black hair upwards, proclaiming, that he was distied in a dirty queue, with a little pow- appointed and disgusted. der about it, whilst the whole of the In the barbour of Calais a column back and collar of his coat is incrusted has been erected in commemoration of with it), hanging across one of his small the landing of Louis XVIII, and a brass jaded borses, rousing the animals, by plate has been fixed in the stones of

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