An historical and critical review of the civil wars in Ireland, from the reign of queen Elizabeth to the settlement under ki ng William. With the state of the Irish Catholics from that settlement to 1778

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Índice

The patience and submission of the natives
89
The free gift or contribution continued for the service
99
Lord Wentworths manner of modelling the Irish parlia
105
The commons require an amwer to their remonstrance
117
BOOK IV
125
Further distress of the people of Connaught
132
Some invidious reflections on the foregoing passage consi
138
la immediate cause of the insurrection in 1641
147
BOOK V
159
The masssacre in IslandMagee
165
The original depositions now in the possession of the uni
174
IACJI V The original examinations further considered
177
Concerning the number of murders
178
V1 The humanity of the chiefs of the insurgents 81
181
The conduct of the catholic clergy during the insurrection
189
The first cause of the insurrections increasing
192
The same subject continued 104
194
Further misconduct of the lords justices
197
The nobility and gentry of the pale banished from Dublin
200
The justices invite the lords of the pale to a conference
201
The gentlemen of the pale assemble at Swords
204
The lords justices violate the public faith
205
The order for a general pardon limited by the justices
207
Lords justices orders concerning Roman catholic priests
211
Thecau of the insurrection in Munster
213
The cause of the insurrection in Comiaught
217
Further severities of the lords justices
220
XXL The gentlemen of the pale petition the king and parlia ment
223
XXU Barbarous orders of the lords justices and council to the earl of Ormond 285
224
Orders of the English parliament relative to Ireland
227
The nobility and gentry of Ireland unite in a regular body
229
The king consents to hear the grievances of the insur gents 2 13
233
in Another contrivance of the justices to hinder the cessation
235
JV Sir William Parsons displaced from the government
239
His majestys commissioners meet those of the confederate catholics to treat of the cessation
241
The cessation at last concluded
243
The advantages of the cessation to his majestys army
246
Peace concluded with the marquis of Ormond
283
Lord Clanrickard expostulates with the marquis of Ormond
290
TV Lord Digby arrives in Dublin and causes the peace with
296
d
303
The bad effects of the clergys proceedings
305
The Nuncio ONial and Preston advance towards Dublin
313
Ormond consents to the engagement
320
Ormond delivers up the kings authority to the English
326
Ormond prepares to leave the kingdom Is pressed
338
The Marquis of Ormond returns to Ireland
341
The happy effects of this peace Ormonds defeat at Rath
347
Owen ONial submits to the peace Inchiquins force
353
XXVHL The king is invited to Scotland
360
the Scots r
366
The presbytery of Bangors proceedings on the peace
373
XXXVL Treaty with the duke of Lorrain
380
BOOK IX
386
Henry Cromwells administration in Ireland
398
The Irish catholics excluded out of the general act of obli
404
Loalty of the catholic nobility and gentry of Ireland
413
CSAP
416
The affairs of Ireland brought before the English council
426
The time limited for holding these courts found too short
436
Some reflections on the foregoing acts
443
this juncture r 413
446
The probable motives of the duke of Ormonds past
450
BOOK X
459
The behaviour of the Irish priftts and new recruits under
469
A conspiracy of the protestants of Dublin against the
478
King James countermands De Rosens order
487
v
516
Abstract of the report and return of commissioners sent
612
Extract of a collection of some of the massacres and murders
623
A Remonstrance of the Right Hon J earl of Castlehaven
635
To the kingThe humble Remonstrance of the Roman
642
The several arguments of sir Theobald Butler counsellor
651
XVn The coronation oath of James II
660

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Página 21 - ... and if they found a plot of watercresses or shamrocks, there they flocked as to a feast for the time...
Página xv - ... and images; nay even their transubstantiation. But while they acknowledge a foreign power, superior to the sovereignty of the kingdom, they cannot complain if the laws of that kingdom will not treat them upon the footing of good subjects.
Página 505 - Mount-Leinster, now belonging to the regiments in the aforesaid garrisons and quarters of the Irish army, who were beyond the seas, and sent thither upon affairs of their respective regiments, or the army in general, shall have the benefit and advantage of the second article, provided they return hither within the space of eight months from the date of these presents, and submit to their Majesties' government, and take the above-mentioned oath.
Página 504 - Mayo, or any of them ; and all the commissioned officers in their majesties' quarters that belong to the Irish regiments now in being, that are treated with, and who are not prisoners of war, or have taken protection, and who shall return and submit to their majesties...
Página 505 - ... provided also, that no person whatsoever shall have or enjoy the benefit of this article, that shall neglect or refuse to take the oath of allegiance,* made by act of parliament in England, in the first year of the reign of their present majesties, when thereunto required.
Página 504 - The Roman catholics of this kingdom shall enjoy such privileges in the exercise of their religion, as are consistent with the laws of Ireland, or as they did enjoy in the reign of king Charles II.; and their majesties, as soon as their affairs will permit them to summon a parliament in this kingdom, will endeavour to procure the said Roman catholics such further security in that particular, as may preserve them from any disturbance upon the account of their said religion.
Página 508 - ... should be inserted and be part of the said articles, which words having been casually omitted by the writer, the omission was not discovered till after the said articles were signed, but was taken notice of before the second town was surrendered ; and that our said Justices and...
Página 142 - Some time before the rebellion broke out,'x says Mr. Carte, " it was confidently reported, that sir John Clothworthy, who well knew the desigus of the faction that governed the house of commons in England, had declared there in a speech, that the conversion of the papists in Ireland, was only to be effected by the bible in one hand and the sword in the other; and Mr.
Página 508 - ... that our said Justices and General, or one of them, did promise that the said clause should be made good, it being within the intention of the capitulation and inserted in the foul...
Página 52 - This bred such comfort and security in the hearts of all men as thereupon ensued the calmest and most universal peace that ever was seen in Ireland.

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