Imágenes de página
PDF
ePub

Abdelm. Weep on, weep on, for it becomes you

now;
These tears you to that love may well allow.
His unrepenting soul, if it could move ;!?
Upward in crimes, flew spotted with your love; ..
And brought contagion to the blessed above.
Lyndar. He's gone, and peace go with a constant

mind!
His love deserved I should have been more kind;
But then your love and greater worth I knew :
I was unjust to him, but just to you.

Abdelm. I was his enemy, and rival too,
Yet I some tears to his misfortune owe:
You owe him more; weep then, and join with me;
So much is due even to humanity.
Lyndar. Weep for this wretch, whose memory I

hate!
Whose folly made us both unfortunate!.. -
Weep for this fool, who did my laughter move!
This whining, tedious, heavy lump of love!
Abdelm. Had fortune favoured him, and frowned

on me,
I then had been that heavy fool, not he:
Just this had been my funeral elegy.
Thy arts and falsehood I before did know,
But this last baseness was concealed till now;
And 'twas no more than needful to be known;
I could be cured by such an act alone.
My love, half blasted, yet in time would shoot;
But this last tempest rends it to the root.
Lyndar. These little piques, which now your

anger move,
Will vanish, and are only signs of love.
You've been too fierce; and, at some other time,
I should not with such ease forgive your crime;
But, in a day of public joy like this,
I pardon, and forget whate’er's amiss. .

.

no more ied, and tred, with

Abdelin. These arts have oft prevailed, but must

no more : The spell is ended, and the enchantment o'er. You have at last destroyed, with much ado, That love, which none could have destroyed, but

you. My love was blind to your deluding art; But blind men feel, when stabbed so near the heart.

Lyndar. I must confess there was some pity due; But I concealed it out of love to you.

Abdelm. No, Lyndaraxa; ’tis at last too late:
Our loves have mingled with too inuch of fate.
I would, but cannot now, myself deceive:
o that you still could cheat, and I believe!

Lyndar. Do not so light a quarrel long pursue : You grieve your rival was less loved than you. "Tis hard, when men of kindness must complain!

Abdelm. I'm now awake, and cannot dream again.
Lyndar. Yet hear

Abdelm. No more; nothing my heart can bend:
That queen, you scorned, you shall this night attend.
Your life the king has pardoned for my sake;
- But on your pride I some revenge must take.
See now the effects of what your arts designed!
Thank your inconstant and ambitious mind.
'Tis just that she, who to no love is true,
Should be forsaken, and contemned, like you.

Lyndar. All arts of injured women I will try :
First I will be revenged; and then I'll die.
But like some falling tower,
Whose seeming firmness does the sight beguile,
So hold I up my nodding head a while,
Till they come under; and reserve my fall,
That with my ruins I may reach them all.
Abdelm. Conduct her hence.

Exit LYNDAR. Guarded.

Enter a Soldier.
Sold. Almanzor is victorious without fight;
*The foes retreated when he came in sight.
Under the walls, this night, his men are drawn,
And mean to seek the Spaniard with the dawn.

Abdelm. The sun's declined ::
Command the watch be set without delay,
And in the fort let bold Benducar stay.- Exit Sold.
I'll haste to court, where solitude I'll fly,
And herd, like wounded deer, in company.
But oh, how hard a passion to remove,
When I must shun myself, to 'scape from love!

- [Exit.

SCENE III.--A Gallery in the Alhambra.

ZULEMA, HAMET.
Hamet. I thought your passion for the queen was

dead, Or that your love had, with your hopes, been fled.

Zul. 'Twas like a fire within a furnace pent : I smothered it, and kept it long from vent; But, fed with looks, and blown with sighs so fast, It broke a passage through my lips at last. Hamet. Where found you confidence your suit to

move? Our broken fortunes are not fit to love. Well; you declared your love :-What followed

then? Zul. She looked as judges do on guilty men, When big with fate they triumph in their dooms, And smile before the deadly sentence comes. Silent I stood, as I were thunder-struck; Condemned and executed with a look..

Hamet. You must, with haste, some remedy pre

pare : Now you are in, you must break through the snare:

Zul. She said, she would my folly yet conceal; But vowed my next attempt she would reveal.

Hamet. 'Tis dark; and in this lonely gallery, Remote from noise, and shunning every eye, One hour each evening she in private mourns, And prays, and to the circle then returns.

Zul. These lighted tapers show the time is nigh. Perhaps my courtship will not be in vain : At least, few women will of force complain. At the other end of the Gallery, enter ALMANZOR

and ESPERANZA.
Hamet. Almanzor, and with him
The favourite slave of the sultana queen.

Zul. Ere they approach, let us retire unseen,
And watch our time when they return again :
Then force shall give, if favour does dený;
And, that once done, we'll to the Spaniards fly.

[Exeunt Zul. and HAMET. Almanz. Now stand; the apartment of the queen

is near; And, from this place, your voice will reach her ear.

[ESPERANZA goes out:

SONG, IN TWO PARTS.

He. How unhappy a lover am 1,

While I sigh for my Phillis in vain; . All my hopes of delight

Are another man's right,

Who is happy, while I am in pain!

[ocr errors]

II.

· She. Since her honour allows no relief.

But to pity the pains which you bear,
'Tis the best of your fate,
In a hopeless estate,
To give o'er, and betimes to despair.

III.
He. I have tried the false medcine in vain;

For I wish what I hope not to win:
From without, my desire
Has no food to its fire;
· But it burns and consumes me within.

IV.

She. Yet, at least, 'tis a pleasure to know

That you are not unhappy alone:
For the nymph you adore
Is as wretched, and more;

And counts all your sufferings her own.

He. O ye gods, let me suffer for both;

At the feet of my Phyllis I'll lie:

I'll resign up my breath, . And take pleasure in death,

To be pitied by her when I die.

VI.

She. What her honour denied you in life;

In her death she will give to your love.
Such a flame as is true
After fate will renew,

For the souls to meet closer above.

« AnteriorContinuar »