The Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides: With Samuel Johnson, LL. D.

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Henry Baldwin, 1786 - 442 páginas

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LibraryThing Review

Reseña de usuario  - mbmackay - LibraryThing

Boswell's tale of the tour of the highlands by his hero, Samuel Johnson. The book is more about Johnson than Scotland, but still makes fascinating reading almost 250 years later. Read April 2017 Leer reseña completa

LibraryThing Review

Reseña de usuario  - Cecrow - LibraryThing

When they engaged on their 1773 journey through Scotland together, James Boswell (1740-1795) was of Scottish descent and almost half the age of Dr. Samuel Johnson (1709-1784), who was not well ... Leer reseña completa

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Página 99 - Live you ? or are you aught That man may question ? You seem to understand me, By each at once her choppy finger laying Upon her skinny lips. — You should be women, And yet your beards forbid me to interpret That you are so.
Página 17 - Upon the whole, I have always considered him, both in his lifetime and since his death, as approaching as nearly to the idea of a perfectly wise and virtuous man, as perhaps the nature of human frailty will permit.
Página 351 - Stern o'er each bosom reason holds her state With daring aims irregularly great ; Pride in their port, defiance in their eye, I see the lords of human kind pass by...
Página 35 - The teeming mother anxious for her race, Begs for each birth the fortune of a face: Yet Vane could tell what ills from beauty spring; And Sedley curs'd the form that pleas'da king.
Página 46 - We talked of change of manners. Dr. Johnson observed that our drinking less than our ancestors was owing to the change from ale to wine. "I remember," said he, "when all the decent people in Lichfield got drunk every night, and were not the worse thought of.
Página 340 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses, whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings. Far from me and from my friends be such frigid philosophy as may conduct us indifferent and unmoved over any ground which has been dignified by wisdom, bravery, or virtue. That man is little to be envied whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow warmer among the ruins...
Página 315 - Its merits had not escaped the notice of Dr. Johnson, though in politics opposed to much it inculcates, for in reply to an observation of Boswell in praise of the French Ana, he said, ' A few of them are good, but we have one book of that kind better than any of them — Selden's Table Talk.
Página 13 - There must always be some advantage, on one side or other; and it is better that advantage should be had by talents, than by chance. If lawyers were to undertake no causes till they were sure they were just, a man might be precluded altogether from a trial of his claim, though, were it judicially examined, it might be found a very just claim.
Página 5 - He was prone to superstition, but not to credulity. Though his imagination might incline him to a belief of the marvellous and the mysterious, his vigorous reason examined the evidence with jealousy.
Página 171 - Tartan waistcoat with gold buttons and gold button-holes, a bluish philibeg, and Tartan hose. He had jet black hair tied behind, and was a large stately man, with a steady sensible countenance.

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