Lectures on Natural and Experimental Philosophy: Considered in It's [sic] Present State of Improvement : Describing, in a Familiar and Easy Manner, the Principal Phenomena of Nature, and Shewing, that They All Co-operate in Displaying the Goodness, Wisdom, and Power of God, Volumen 2

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R. Hindmarsh ... ; Sold by the author, 1794
 

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Página 93 - To a poet nothing can be useless. Whatever is beautiful, and whatever is dreadful, must be familiar to his imagination : he must be conversant with all that is awfully vast or elegantly little. The plants of the garden, the animals of the wood, the minerals of the earth, and meteors of the sky, must all concur to store his mind with inexhaustible variety...
Página 129 - The greateft part of human knowledge refts upon evidence of this kind. Indeed we can have no other for general truths which are contingent in their nature, and depend upon the will and ordination of the maker of the world. He governs the world he has made, by general laws. The effects of...
Página 119 - ... in the entrance of philosophy, when the second causes, which are next unto the senses, do offer themselves to the mind of man, if it dwell and stay there, it may induce some oblivion of the highest cause ; but when a man passeth on...
Página 95 - Therefore we find the prophet Jeremiah reclaiming that power to Jehovah, as the God who made and governed the world : ' Are there any among the vanities of the Gentiles that can cause rain ? or can the heavens give showers ? Art thou not he, O Jehovah our God ? Therefore we will wait upon thee : for thou hast made all these things :
Página 18 - All the rivers run into the sea; yet the sea is not full; unto the place whence the rivers come, thither they return again.
Página 150 - Teneriffe, or even of St. Peter's Church at Rome, it would be the work of a lifetime. It would appear still more incredible to such beings as we have supposed, if they were informed of the discoveries which may be made by this little organ in things far beyond the reach of any other sense : that...
Página 295 - ... of touch, that, by the addition of an organ consisting of a ball and socket of an inch diameter, they might be enabled, in an instant of time, without changing their place to perceive the disposition of a whole army or the order of a battle, the figure of a magnificent palace or all the variety of a landscape...
Página 479 - I have here supposed that my reader is acquainted with that great modern discovery, which is at present universally acknowledged by all the inquirers into natural philosophy: namely, that light and colours, as apprehended by the imagination, are only ideas in the mind, and not qualities that have any existence in matter.
Página 133 - ... imagination ; nor is he to be confined by any limit in space or time : but as his knowledge of nature is founded on the observation of sensible things, he must begin with these, and must often return to them to examine his progress by them. Here is his secure hold ; and as he sets out from thence, so if he likewise trace not often his steps backwards...
Página 426 - ... vapours, all of which whitened the flowers. I 'reftored the red colour of each of thefe, by applying to them indifcriminately either vegetable, or mineral, acids. It appears, from thefe experiments, that the colouring matter of the flowers is not difcharged or removed, but only diflblved, by the phlogifton ; and thereby divided into particles too minute to exhibit any colour. In this ftate, together with the vegetable, juice in which they are diffufed, they form a colourlefs tranfparent covering,...

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