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Cheque, after a person's death.-A Banker must not pay a Cheque if he is aware the Drawer is dead. He is quite justified in paying the Cheque if he is ignorant of the fact. Also, a Cheque is invalid after the Drawer is a Bankrupt.

Cheque, when presented for payment.—There is no settled rule in law, but it is an understood thing that it is usual to present it soon after it is drawn, as in case of delay and failure of the Bank, the holder will have no claim on the Drawer.

Cheque, if dishonoured. - The Banker writes across it "No effects," or "Refer to Drawer."

Writing distinctly.-Be careful in drawing a Cheque for eight pounds that the "t" at the end of the word "Eight" should join on the "P" of 、 the word "Pounds." I believe no sum is so easily altered in a Cheque, if it should fall into the hands of a dishonest person. By simply adding a "y" it makes "Eight" "Eighty." The dots should be put very close to the figure 8 to prevent

an o being added there. Also, it is advisable not to allow room for a dishonest person to add anything before the sum written down. Thus, if your Cheque is for £60, you must not leave space enough to add "Two Hundred" before the Sixty." Another safeguard is as follows:-suppose your Cheque is for £82 15s. 6d., write across it in bold letters the words, "Under ninety pounds."

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Stamp.-All Cheques must have a Penny Stamp, adhesive or impressed; also all Drafts or Orders for payment of money to Bearer on demand. When you write a Cheque on a piece of notepaper you must affix a Stamp.

Printed Cheque-book.-Ask your Bankers for a Cheque-book ready stamped; it saves trouble. You will have to pay a penny for each Stamp: the most usual number is three dozen, which will therefore cost 35. Your Cheque-book should be locked up, never left about.

This is a specimen of the Cheque-books ordinarily given :

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The margin on the left-hand side is for setting down the particulars of the Cheques that have been drawn and torn off.

If the Cheque-book is made out to "or order," the words "on demand" generally accompany the word "pay:" if not, they are implied.

We will suppose Mrs. A. Bushe wishes to pay Mrs. Collins, on May 4th, 1862, the sum of £27 6s. 8d. for Furniture, and that she banks with Messrs. Edwards in Newcastle :

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If your printed Cheque has no Stamp, you must procure and put on an adhesive one. The margin, or "counterfoil," of your Cheques is a useful reference, to know when, and to whom, they were severally paid.

To procure money from your Banker for yourself by Post.-Write a Cheque "to Self or Bearer;" cross it with the name of your Banker, and send it by post to him with the accompanying letter. Suppose your Banker is Messrs. Coutts—

To Messrs. Coutts.

Please to send the amount of the enclosed Cheque, in five-pound notes, in a registered letter to my address as below, viz.

(State address.)

Messrs. Coutts & Co.

London, March 13, 1863.

Please pay to self, or Bearer, Twenty Pounds.

£20:0:0

London.

Messrs: Coutts,

Ellen Strange.

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