Thus Spoke Zarathustra: A Book for Everyone and Nobody

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Oxford University Press, 2005 - 335 páginas
hus Spake Zarathustra is a masterpiece of literature as well as philosophy. It was Nietzsche's own favorite and has proved to be his most popular. In this book he addresses the problem of how to live a fulfilling life in a world without meaning, in the aftermath of "the death of God." His solution lies in the idea of eternal recurrence, which he calls "the highest formula of affirmation that can ever be attained." A successful engagement with this profoundly Dionysian idea enables us to choose clearly among the myriad possibilities that existence offers, and thereby to affirm every moment of our lives with others on this "sacred" earth.
Grahm Parkes's new translation is more accurate than previous versions, and is the first to retain the musicality of the original, by paying attention to the rhythms and cadences of the German. His introduction examines the work's three most important philosophical ideas and for the first time annotates the abundance of allusions to the Bible and other classic texts with which Nietzsche's masterpiece is in conversation.
 

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CONTENTS
5
FIRST PART
7
ZARATHUSTRAS PROLOGUE
9
THUS SPOKE ZARATHUSTRA I
14
THE SPEECHES OF ZARATHUSTRA I On the Three Transformations
23
On the Professorial Chairs of Virtue
25
On Believers in a World Behind
27
On the Despisers of the Body
30
The NightSong
91
The DanceSong
93
The GraveSong
95
On SelfOvercoming
98
On Those Who Are Sublime ΙΟΙ
101
On the Land of Culture
103
On Immaculate Perception
105
On the Scholars
108

On Enjoying and Suffering the Passions
31
On the Pale Criminal
33
On Reading and Writing
35
On the Tree on the Mountainside
37
On the Preachers of Death
39
On War and WarriorPeoples
41
On the New Idol
43
On the Flies of the MarketPlace
45
On Chastity
48
On the Friend
49
On the Thousand Goals and
51
On Love of Ones Neighbour
53
On the Way of the Creator
54
On Old and Young Little Women
57
On the Bite of the Adder
59
On Children and Marriage
60
On Free Death
62
On the Bestowing Virtue
64
SECOND PART
69
The Child With the Mirror
71
Upon the Isles of the Blest
73
On Those Who Pity
75
On the Priests
78
On the Virtuous
80
On the Rabble
83
On the Tarantulas
85
On the Famous Wise Men
88
On the Poets
110
On Great Events
112
The Soothsayer
116
On Redemption
119
On Human Cleverness
123
The Stillest Hour
126
THIRD PART
129
The Wanderer
131
On the Vision and Riddle
134
On Blissfulness Against Ones Will
138
Before the Sunrise
141
On the Virtue That Makes Smaller
144
Upon the Mount of Olives
149
On Passing By
152
On Apostates
155
The Return Home
158
23
183
W W W N N N N O 9
237
Explanatory Notes
288
27
289
35
292
39
295
41
304
Index
322
60
323
62
324
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Sobre el autor (2005)

The son of a Lutheran pastor, Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche was born in 1844 in Roecken, Prussia, and studied classical philology at the Universities of Bonn and Leipzig. While at Leipzig he read the works of Schopenhauer, which greatly impressed him. He also became a disciple of the composer Richard Wagner. At the very early age of 25, Nietzsche was appointed professor at the University of Basel in Switzerland. In 1870, during the Franco-Prussian War, Nietzsche served in the medical corps of the Prussian army. While treating soldiers he contracted diphtheria and dysentery; he was never physically healthy afterward. Nietzsche's first book, The Birth of Tragedy Out of the Spirit of Music (1872), was a radical reinterpretation of Greek art and culture from a Schopenhaurian and Wagnerian standpoint. By 1874 Nietzsche had to retire from his university post for reasons of health. He was diagnosed at this time with a serious nervous disorder. He lived the next 15 years on his small university pension, dividing his time between Italy and Switzerland and writing constantly. He is best known for the works he produced after 1880, especially The Gay Science (1882), Thus Spake Zarathustra (1883-85), Beyond Good and Evil (1886), On the Genealogy of Morals (1887), The Antichrist (1888), and Twilight of the Idols (1888). In January 1889, Nietzsche suffered a sudden mental collapse; he lived the last 10 years of his life in a condition of insanity. After his death, his sister published many of his papers under the title The Will to Power. Nietzsche was a radical questioner who often wrote polemically with deliberate obscurity, intending to perplex, shock, and offend his readers. He attacked the entire metaphysical tradition in Western philosophy, especially Christianity and Christian morality, which he thought had reached its final and most decadent form in modern scientific humanism, with its ideals of liberalism and democracy. It has become increasingly clear that his writings are among the deepest and most prescient sources we have for acquiring a philosophical understanding of the roots of 20th-century culture.

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