The Edinburgh Review and the West Indies: With Observations on the Pamphlets of Messrs. Stephen, Macaulay, &c. and Remarks on the Slave Registry Bill

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John Smith and Son, 1816 - 360 páginas
 

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Página 226 - They, looking back, all the eastern side beheld Of Paradise, so late their happy seat, Waved over by that flaming brand; the gate With dreadful faces thronged and fiery arms. Some natural tears they dropped, but wiped them soon; The world was all before them, where to choose Their place of rest, and Providence their guide.
Página 152 - He that provideth not for his own, and especially for those of his own house, hath denied the faith, and is worse than an infidel.
Página 268 - The men are very fond of palm wine; they will spend a whole day in looking for palm wine. They love dancing; they will dance all night. They have but little, yet they are happy whilst that little lasts. At times they are greatly troubled with the Slave Trade, by some of them being caught under different pretences. A man owes money; or some one of his family owes it; or he has been guilty of adultery. In these cases, if unable to seize the party themselves, they give him up to some one who is able,...
Página 245 - BACK to their former state, which is still the state of the nations two or three hundred miles inland. They will weave their own cloth, raise their own tobacco, smelt their own iron, and resume their bows and arrows. Be it remembered, that the greatest demand for their rice, (the ' staple of the country') is to supply the slaves while kept in factories, or during the middle passage. The collection of rude produce is not industry; and if it were, how contemptible is its quantity, and how easily is...
Página 23 - The hostility of the West Indians was greatly aggravated by an attempt which had been made, with considerable success, to confound the abolition of the Trade in Slaves with the Emancipation of those already in the colonies ; though the abolitionists took all opportunities of proclaiming, that it was the Slave Trade, not Slavery, against which they were directing their efforts.
Página 267 - The king is poorer than any of his subjects. I have many a time gone into the houses of their kings. Sometimes I have seen one box, and a bed made of sticks on the ground, and a mat, or two country cloths, on the bed. He is obliged to work himself if he has no wives and children. He has only the name of king, without the power : he cannot do as he pleases. When there is a palaver, he must have it settled before the rest of the old men, who are all looked upon as much as the king; and the people will...
Página 97 - The negroes are truly the Jacobins of the West India islands — they are the anarchists, the terrorists, the domestic enemy. Against them it becomes rival nations to combine, and hostile governments to coalesce.
Página 291 - ... much nearer the truth to affirm, that a self-interested intercourse will take place; and that injuries, retaliations, WARS AND CONQUESTS, will be the natural effects of any intercourse. That civilization will follow conquests, I more readily allow...
Página 343 - Your own mind will suggest to you the guards, limitations, and exceptions -with which what I now say should be received. • " I have NO DOUBT that Government will be disposed to adopt almost any plan which we may propose to them, with respect to Africa, provided we will but save them the trouble of thinking. This you will see to be highly important.
Página 245 - ... commodities. I rather think that they will sink back to their former state, which is still the state of the natives two or three hundred miles inland. They will weave their own cloth, raise their own tobacco, smelt their own iron, and resume their bows and arrows. Be it remembered, that the greatest demand for their rice (the " staple of the country ") is to supply the slaves while kept in factories, or during the Middle Passage.

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