Imágenes de página
PDF
ePub

battle fleets to the blows of German submarines which we may have no certain means of destroying. It will not be altogether a satisfactory end to a war if we ruin, indeed, German sea-borne trade, but end with the Pomeranian Grenadier in Palace Yard and the Altona Corps at Arthur's Seat.

We cannot doubt that, provided Germany does not open the ball with a naval surprise followed by invasion, she will make ready the troops destined for invasion, and will keep them ready to reap the fruits of any success that fortune may send her at sea. We cannot hope to attack Germany on land without allies, because an oversea attack upon an armed nation is an absurdity. But Germany can hope to attack us-and herein lies the profound differ ence between the military position of the two countries in war-if she secures the local control of maritime communications for a limited period, more properly to be measured by hours than by days.

It is very difficult to make people think in anything but terms of Dreadnoughts. I am not in the least attacking the Dreadnought policy. I believe that the Dreadnought was the natural evolution from the type which immediately preceded it, and that without our Dreadnought ships we should be now, and for some years to come, very insecure. But I think that as soon as the German submarine flotilla is fairly complete, there will be no place for any great ship in the North Sea.

Very probably this opinion will be strongly denied. Many great firms have laid down an immense and expensive plant for the construction of these monsters, and will be sure to use all the literary and other talent at their disposal to maintain the present policy of construction even when the German submarines are ready. It is also certain that it must be a perfectly hateful idea to senior officers of the Navy that & wretched little submarine should dominate waters in which a Dreadnought proudly sails. Yet, what other conclusion is possible? The submarine can observe, attack, and sink the Dreadnought ship while she can neither observe, nor attack, nor yet sink, except by accident, the submarine. It will be David and Goliath over again, with this difference, that instead of the little pebble from the brook, the submarine will send 300 lb. of gun-cotton into the vitals of her foe.

I am, therefore, far more concerned to see a greater development of the flotillas than I am to see much more money expended upon a type which, like Roland's mare, has all merits imaginable, but is unfortunately dead. Most of all do I hope to see means discovered for attacking submarines effectually, and in a second article I hope to give some additional reasons for my belief that a naval war in the North Sea presents problems to which neither the last great war in the Far East, nor any war recorded by history, affords any guidance at all.

INDEX TO VOL. CLXXXVII.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

outwitting of Count Schouvaloff re-
lated by, 683-
swindling
Tricks exposed by, 684 et seq

Scotland Yard stories told by: a
female impostor, 832-young lady
masqueraders in male attire, 833-an
Indian law-student's fiancé, 834-a
divorce and elopement case, 837 et
seq.-subjects of delusions, 840 et seq.
ARMY COUNCIL SYSTEM, THE, 397.
Artistic beauty, Mr Balfour's lecture
at Oxford on, 122 et seq.-Benedetto
Croce's theory of, 125 et seq.
ASHTAROTH, THE GROVE OF, 802.
AS IT MIGHT BE, 309.

Asquith, Mr, speech of, at the Albert
Hall, 159-Mr Balfour's reply to the
speech of, 160 et seq.-decline of the
authority of, 306-pronouncement of,
on Tariff Reform, 307-Balliol remin-
iscences of, 637-submission of, to the
Nationalist party in the House of
Commons, 747 et seq.

ASSISTANT RESIDENT, SOME HAPPEN-
INGS IN THE LIFE OF AN, 735.
"AULD MAITLAND," THE MYSTERY OF,
872.
Australian cricketers, matches of the,
in 1909, in England, 89 et seq.
AVIATION IN 1909, 206.
Balfour, Mr, the Romanes Lecture of,
at Oxford, 122 et seq.-reply of, to
Mr Asquith's speech at the Albert
Hall, 160 et seq.

Ballad of "Auld Maitland," the, James
Hogg and Sir Walter Scott charged
with fraud regarding, 872-collation
of Scott's published edition of, with
Hogg's autograph copy, 873 et seq.-
history of, 875-Scott's reading of, to
John Leyden, 878-probable modern-
ised form of, 879.

Ballantynes, Sir Walter Scott's partner-
ship with the, 198.

[graphic]

Egypt, seditious character of the Na-
tionalist Press of, 881 et seq.-British
rule in, imperilled, 884 et seq.
ELECTIONS AND THEIR MORAL, THE,
430.

Elopement cases, stories of, 837 et seq.,
839.

Elpheta, origin of the name, in Chaucer,
654.

EMMA, 790.

English county cricket, poor quality of
bowling in, 96 et seq.-weak batting
in, 98-dearth of promising recruits
in, 99-importation of foreign mer.
cenaries in, 101.

Esher Committee, changes in the War
Office introduced by the, 397 et seq.
FANCY FARM, Chaps. 1.-III., 21-iv.

VI., 213-VII.-IX., 378—X.-XII., 531—
XIII.-XV., 706-XVI.-XVIII., 852.
FATHER TOM AND THE POPE; OR, A
NIGHT AT THE VATICAN, 601.
Female impostor, story of a, 832.
Female political canvasser, some ex-
periences of a, 564 et seq.
Fenianism, revival of, 67 et seq.-Acts
of Parliament against, 242 et seq.-Sir
William Harcourt's efforts to sup-
press, 245 et seq.
FIRST IMPRESSIONS, 703.
Flying machines, the most renowned,
constructed in 1909, 206-some re-
markable feats of, 207 et seq.-em-
ployment of, for useful purposes, 208
et seq.-motors most suitable for, 210
-accidents to, 211 et seq.
Forts, numbers of ruined, in Ireland,

137.

FRENCH ELECTIONS AND THE CHURCH,
THE, 621.

Frohman, Mr, revival of the English
drama by, 580 et seq.-plays rendered
by, 582 et seq.

FROM THE OUTPOSTS: AMADudu, 726—
THE BIRDS, 732-SOME HAPPENINGS
IN THE LIFE OF AN ASSISTANT
RESIDENT, 735.

FRONTIER, AN OLD, 520.
Galsworthy, Mr, the play of "Justice"
by, 582 et seq.

Gambling clubs in London, raids on,
688 et seq.

Ganges Cup, wild boar hunt for the,
559 et seq.
Geese, shooting of, in the West of
Ireland, 139 et seq.

German Army, the, contrasted with
that of Great Britain, 454 et seq.
German Navy League, growth and aims
of the, 15 et seq.

GERMANY, THE DEVELOPMENT OF, 1.
Germany, the growth of, 2-Bismarck's
ambitious designs regarding, 3 et seq.
-the railways of, 5 et seq.-the Fiscal
Policy of, 7-the Steel Trust of, 8-

the chemical industries of, 9, 11-the
agricultural industries of, 9 et seq.-
the schools of, 12-the foreign policy
of, 14-efforts to obtain the supremacy
of the sea by, 15-the national wealth
of, 16-river and canal transport of,
18-population of, 19-colonising
aims of, 20-the torpedo craft of,
895-the submarine flotillas of, 899
et seq.

Ghilzai clans, yearly exodus of the, 529.
Gladstone, Mr, the life of, saved by his
smile, 841.

Gold, a pretended secret process for
making, 682 et seq.

"Gold brick" swindle, modus operandi
of the, 687.

Gorst, Sir Eldon, report of, on Egyptian
affairs, 881 et seq.

Great Britain, policy of Germany to-
wards, 15 et seq.

Greenwood, Frederick, death of, 152-
services of, as editor and journalist,
153 et seq.

GROVE OF ASHTAROTH, THE, 802.
Guanaco, hunting of the, in Patagonia,
842 et seq.

Hermione, meeting on board the, 504
et seq.

HERRING HAUL IN A FRENCH STEAM-
DRIFTER, A, 658.

Herring-nets, shooting the, 662 et seq.
-hauling in the, 667 et seq.
HISTORIC PARALLEL, AN, 759.
Hogg, James, forgery of the ballad of
"Auld Maitland" attributed to, 872
et seq.

Home Rule, the Nationalists' demand
for, 591 et seq.- and the Budget,
historic parallels to, 760 et seq.
Hood, Sir Alexander Acland, Balliol
reminiscences of, 635.

House of Lords, the, power and value
of, 156 et seq.-Mr Asquith's sugges-
tion as to the veto of, 159-popular
indifference as to reform of, 433
-Mr Asquith's probable procedure
regarding, 434-reform of, 592 et
seq.-Radical assault on, 749 et seq.
HUNT, MY FIRST BY A SAILOR, 343.
HURDLE, THE LAST, 691.

:

India, British rule in, 301 et seq.
INDIAMAN, THE, 73.

Indian law student, the fiancé of an,
834.

INDRA'S SWORD, THE WARDENS OF, 787.
IN KAMBODIA : I., DAWN ON THE ME-
KONG, 777-II., UP THE MEKONG TO
PHNOM PENH, 780-III., THE PALACE
OF THE KAMBODIAN KING, 783-
IV., THE WARDENS OF INDRA'S
SWORD, 787.
INTERVAL, A LUCID, 165.
IRELAND, SNIPE - SHOOTING
WEST OF, 131.

IN

THE

[ocr errors]

"Jack-the-Ripper murders," search for
the perpetrator of the, 357 et seq.
Journalist interviewers, novel treat-
ment of, 513 et seq.

Jowett, Dr, Master of Balliol, reminisc-
ences of, 633.

Kadir Cup, wild boar hunt for the, 555
et seq.

KAMBODIA, IN: I., DAWN ON THE ME-

KONG, 777-II., UP THE MEKONG TO
PHNOM PENH, 780-III., THE PALACE
OF THE KAMBODIAN KING, 783-
IV., THE WARDENS OF INDRA'S
SWORD, 787.

KAMBODIAN KING, THE PALACE OF
THE, 783.

Kilmainham treaty, history of the, 69
et seq.

King Edward VII., universal sorrow for
the loss of, 763-training and career
of, 764—conduct of, as a king, 765 et
seq.missions of peace undertaken
by, 767 et seq.

King George V., character of, 890-
advantages and opportunities of, ib.

et seq.

Labouchere, Mr, laying a trap for, 367.
Land question, Mr Balfour's views on
the, 162.

LAST HURDLE, THE, 691.

Le Caron, services of, in connection
with the Fenian conspiracy, 364
et seq.

LETEMALKUM, THE DEFENCE OF FORT,
457.

-

'Letters of John Stuart Mill' edited by
Hugh Elliot, notice of, 886 et seq.
Liberty, the Radical boon of, 417 et seq.
-various definitions of, 419 en-
croachments of the State on, 421 et
seq. inalienable possession of, in
thought and life, 424-checks on, as
regards speech, 425-example of the
hatred of, 426 et seq.

-

LIFE, NATIONAL, OR NATIONAL DEATH,
443.

LIGHTER SIDE OF MY OFFICIAL LIFE,
THE IV., A Lapse toward Graver
Matters, 61-V., Fighting the Dyna-
mitards, 242-VI., At Scotland Yard,
356-VII., Some Scotland Yard Ex-
periences and Incidents, 508-VIII.,
Sharps and Flats, 678-IX., Some
Scotland Yard Stories, 832.
Literature, the function of, in the illus-
tration of history, 294 et seq.
Lloyd-George, Mr, mischievous char-

acter of the platform speeches of, 147
et seq.-character of the Budget of,

155.

London, North-East, some experiences
amongst the unemployed in, 409 et seq.
LONDON STREETS, 705.

Lorenzo the Magnificent, career and
character of, 105 et seq.

LUCID INTERVAL, A, 165.
Male attire, young lady masqueraders
in, 833.

Maritime Service of the Honourable
East India Company, story of the,
73 et seq.-ships of the, 75 et seq.-
seamen of the, 78 et seq.-fighting
done by the, 83 et seq.

MARRIAGE OF MARY ANN, THE, 671.
Medici family, the, origin of, 103-
history of the members of, 104 et seq.
-decay and extinction of, 110.
MEDICI, THE, 102.

'Medici, the,' by Colonel G. F. Young,
C.B., notice of, 102 et seq.

Meerut Tent Club, sporting records of
the, 554 et seq.

MEKONG, DAWN ON THE, 777.
'Memoirs of the Dukes of Urbino, illus.

trating the Arms, Arts, and Literature
of Italy, 1440-1630, by James Dennis-
toun of Dennistoun :' a new edition
by Edward Hutton, notice of, 111 et
seq.
'Memories of Sixty Years' by Oscar
Browning, notice of, 755 et seq.
Meredith, George, comedy of "The
Sentimentalists" by, 587.

MIGHT BE, AS IT, 309.

MIGHTY BOAR, THE, 549.

Mill, John Stuart, character and judg-
ments of, 886 et seq.

Milner, Lord, Balliol reminiscences of,
637.

[ocr errors]

Misalliance," Mr Shaw's play of, 585
et seq.
Mohammedan pilgrims, gathering of, at
Dar-el-Maskhara, description of, 473
et seq.

Monro, Mr, Assistant Commissioner
of Police, discovery of a diabolical
Fenian plot by, 246-appointment of,
as Chief Commissioner of Police, 251
-the Police Pension Bill of, 252.
Montefeltro, Federigo, Duke of Urbino,
character and career of, 111 et seq.
MORAL, THE ELECTIONS AND THEIR,
430.

MR BALFOUR AND SIGNOR CROCE, 122.
MUSINGS WITHOUT METHOD: January,

144-February, 294-March, 417-
April, 580-May, 747-June, 881.
MUTINIES, SOME NAVAL, 497.
MUTTRA AND ITS SPORT, 274.
Muttra, description of, 275-variety of
game in vicinity of, 277-pig-stick-
ing at, 278 et seq.-hunting jackals
at, 284-the game birds of, 485
et seq.

MY FIRST HUNT: BY A SAILOR, 343.
MY FRIEND MR SPUNGE, 869.
MYSTERY OF "AULD MAITLand," the,
872.

NAMES AND SOURCE OF CHAUCER'S
'SQUIERES TALE," THE, 654.

« AnteriorContinuar »