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PRONOUNCING VOCABULARY;

WITH

LESSONS IN PROSE AND VERSE,

AND A FEW

GRAMMATICAL EXERCISES.

By GEORGE FULTON,

COMPILER OF A PRONOUNCING SPELLING-BOOK,

DICTIONARY, &c.

EDINBURGH:

PUBLISHED BY OLIVER & BOYD.

1826.

[Price Two Shillings Bound.]

Etwa 827120.5
Edue T 20758.26 0413

ENTERED IN STATIONERS' HALL.

H.

Oliver & Boyd, Printers.

TO THE

NUMEROUS PUPILS,

WHOM THE COMPILER,

IN THE COURSE OF FORTY YEARS,

HAD THE HONOUR OF INSTRUCTING IN THE FIRST

PRINCIPLES OF KNOWLEDGE,

THIS SMALL TREATISE

IS MOST RESPECTFULLY INSCRIBED.

A KEY TO THE ORTHOEPY.

VOWELS. THE VOWELS, with respect 1. THE NAME-SOUNDS. to QUALITY, exemplified in Long, ā ē 1ő

Sentences. Short, á ¢ ï o u Māte Vācåte Māke thēse tīmes more pūre. Mēte Révēre Bad men still cross us. Mīte Finïte Mârk All hěr shôrt rûles. Mõte Promote

Or thus:
Mūte Fūtüre

Fāme can chârm â ll. à a â À
Hē left her.

ē e ě 2. THE SHUT SOUNDS. Short, a ei ou, unmarked.

Find him.

ii Fan Fen Fin

Gõ not north.

õ o ô Fon Fun Use just rûles. ū u û

The short quantity of ā ē īō ūmâ Â u

is marked by å ėïó imă Ă ŭ 3. OCCASIONAL SOUNDS.

Long, â, Â or ô, û

Short, ă, å or o, ŭ, and ě
Lârd, lăst- â ă CONSONANTS.
WÂrd, wăstl  Ă

c and q-pronounced like-k Lôrd, lost $ Ô o g-always hard, as in-go, egg Rûle, fullûŭ

-û ŭ s-always sharp, as in-so, ass Hěr—ě always sharp, as inox

th flat-unmarked, as in-thy tħ sharp-marked, as in--thigh

zh-equivalent to-French j Initial W and Y sound sh-equivalent to— French ch

as in-We Ye j-equivalent to-French di OW and OY sound as ch-equivalent to-Frenchtch in-How Hoy

ng-pronounced as in-ring *** The Simplicity of this Key renders the System obvious.

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The public, and particularly the instructors of youth, are highly indebted to the writings of the late Mr John Walker. By his Rhyming Dictionary and Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, the result of indefatigable labour and research, much has been done to lay open to view the principles of the English language, both with respect to its orthography and orthoepy. But above all his other writings, this author has secured a lasting reputation by his Elements of Elocution and Rhetorical Grammar. In these works he has displayed such acquaintance with the powers of the human voice, and so happy a manner of elucidating and exemplifying the beautiful theory to which his genius gave birth, that the writings of all preceding authors on elocution, and even of those who have succeeded him, (except in so far as they are conformable to his system,) appear to be trifling and unimportant. With respect to the subject of Orthoepy, it is pleasing to observe with what candour he acknowledges the merit of preceding authors.

“ Among those writers," says he, “who deserve the first praise on this subject, is Mr Elphinston, who, in his Principles of the English Language, has reduced the chaos to a system, and, by a deep investigation of the analogies of our tongue, laid the foundation of a just and regular pronunciation.After him, Dr Kenrick contributed a portion of im

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