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THE AUDIPHONE.

FROM PERSONS USING THE AUDIPHONE.

The following testimony is in all respects authentic, and in every instance has come to Rhodes & McClure, unsolicited. The same is also true concerning the notices" From the Press."

"I hear ordinary conversation with ease, and it is a wonder to me every time I use it. Sounds that I had not heard for years and had quite forgotten came back distinctly, and the more I use it the better I like it.

.. Oct. 9, 1879.

"Salem, Mass."

"I attend church, hear perfectly six pews from the desk, and can not hear the minister's voice without the Audiphone. go to lectures and concerts, and, in short, am alive again and a part of the world. Sometimes I think my Audiphone is bewitched, it works so well.

"Dec. 13, 1879. [Second Letter.]

"The Audiphone came O. K. By its aid I am now able to join in general conversation, which I have not been ab'e to do for eighteen years.

Nov. 21, 1879.

Cleveland, O." "The 'Phone at hand; and on trial even more satisfactory than could be expected at first use. My wife and friends are delighted and enthusiastic over it. They are rejoiced that I can hear, and I am glad that it no longer requires an effort on their part to enable me to do so.

Oct. 4, 1879.

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"Peoria, Ills." Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 15.

"Messrs. Rhodes & McClure.-The Audiphone arrived safely, and I hasten to assure you of its perfect success for my hearing. In ordinary conversation I can not use it against th eye-teeth as it makes the voices too loud, although the Audiphone is scarcely drawn. I entered into general conversa ion with perfect ease, last evening, for the first time for five or six years. A melodeon or piano I hear distinctly at great distances. Reading aloud is also easily heard. My family and friends are so rejoiced at my success, and regard the instrument in wonder. My physician is delighted with it, and thinks, as my deafness arose greatly from nervousness, that the Audiphone will stimulate the auditory nerve, and possibly benefit or restore my sense of hearing. The terrible strain being taken from my mind gives me such rest and good spirits that I almost forget my deafness. "Yours very truly,

"Messrs. Rhodes & McClure.-The Audiphone, per Adams' Express, arrived all right, and my wife is delighted with it. She has been to the theater and other public entertainments, and for the first time in twelve years was she able to hear all that was said.

Dec. 9, 1879.

Baltimore, Md." "My Audiphone is the wonder of the day. It helps me wonderfully in conversation. Montrose, Pa."

"My deafness is of long standing, having originated from an attack of scarlet fever more than thirty years ago. The hearing in each ear is defective and in one almost completely impaired. The Audiphone forwarded has been tested in ordinary conversation and also by attendance upon the opera and perfectly subserves the purposes for which it was intended. My hearing when using the instrument is as acute as though no infirmity existed and the effect of the use of the instrument has appreciably toned up and improved the auditory organs-so much so as to have attracted the attention of my family.

"I have exhibited the instrument to several friends afflicted with deafness.

"Nov. 28, 1879.

Washington, D. C.

"I find that the more accustomed I become to the use of my Audiphone the better results do I obtain, and having been quite deaf for over thirty years I can assure you it is a great gratification to be able to attend any place where public speaking is going on and hear all that is uttered by the speakers—a pleasure that has been denied me all that time, Nov. 26, 1879. New York."

"A man deafer than Edison has shown, by the Audiphone, that people born deaf or made deaf by disease, can actually be made to hear to a greater or less extent."-Detroit Free Press. Nov. 25, 1879.

"It is valuable, and will materially help in the education of children like those at the Deaf and Dumb Asylum, and will doubtless prove an effective aid to the many people of impaired hearing. Its discovery therefore is a cause for congratulation, and its attractive appearance and convenience for use, so different from the old-fashioned ear trumpet, will serve to bring it largely into use."-Hartford (Conn.) Courant.

"Deaf mutes were able to hear the music of the piano when at a considerable distance from the instrument."-N. Y. Observer's Report of Private Exhibition.

"This wonderful invention promises to be one of great value.”—Illustrated N. Y. Christian Weekly.

"Tests were satisfactorily applied to several members of a class of deaf mutes who were present, and the pleasure at hearing sound evinced by one young girl was most interesting and touching. A new organ, or a new use for an organ, is discovered, if not created." -From Jenny June's Letter in Baltimore American. Dec. 1, 1879.

"At last the deaf are made to hear. Failing to hear through the front door of the ear the Audiphone carries it to the back."-Concord (N. H.) Daily Monitor. Nov. 25.

"The deaf-mutes were enabled to distinguish the difference between sounds, and enjoyed the singing of one of the ladies."-New York Tribune's Report of Exhibition. Nov. 22, 1879.

"The Audiphone, for the deaf, is likely to supersede the ear trumpet altogether; is not at all objectionable to carry or to use, and enables thousands who never heard a sound in their lives to distinguish letters, words and music for the first time."-Church Union. November 29, 1879.

"In this invention Mr. Rhodes has proved himself a benefactor."-The Standard. Sept. 25, 1879.

"The fact of hearing through the medium of the teeth has long been known, but it has remained for the inventor of the Audiphone to utilize this fact for the benefit of the afflicted."-New York Star. Nov. 22, 1879.

"A class of deaf-mutes

were present, and the tests with them were quite satisfactory. Some heard the notes of the piano for the first time."-New York Evangelist's Report of New York Exhibition. Nov. 27, 1879.

"Seems to discount any of the instruments invented by Edison to aid the hearing.”— New Orleans Times. Nov. 27, 1879.

"The invention will have practical value."-New York Herald.

"It is all the inventor claims it to be." Evansville (Ind.) Journal. Nov. 30, 1879. "The Trial was an eminent success."-Boston Traveler. Dec. 2, 1879.

"Has proved a signal success.”—Albany (N. Y.) Press.
"Would be easily mistaken for a fan."-Democrat and Chronicle.

"Will practically restore to speech and hearing a large class of afflicted persons.”Toronto (Canada) Mail. Dec. 5, 1879.

"Great benefit to those partially deaf.”—Providence (R. I.) Journal. Nov 6, 1879. "Earlier reports are fully borne out by later experiments."-Denver Times. December 6, 1879.

"A new and ingenious device by which the deaf are enabled to hear through the medium of the teeth."-New York Graphic. Nov. 21, 1879.

"One of the wonders of this day of telephones, phonographs and the like, is the Audiphone, invented by Richard S. Rhodes, of Chicago, which enables deaf people to hear with their teeth. People who have once heard, but have grown deaf, and thus know the meaning of sounds and can talk themselves, practically have perfect hearing restored by the use of the Audiphone."—Springfield Republican.

"Had it in our possession not more than two minutes before we were satisfied that i was at least all that we anticipated, but have since found it to be much superior to antici pations. Besides, we find it to improve by use, also to improve our natural hearing, whic is remarkable."Philadelphia, No. 26, 1879.

With a little practice the sounds thus received are interpreted the same as if ther reached the nerves of hearing through the ear."-Scientific American.

FROM THE PRESS.

"Seems to discount any of the instruments invented by Edison to aid the hearing.”— New Orleans Times. Nov. 27, 1879.

"The invention will have practical value."-New York Herald.

"It is all the inventor claims it to be." Evansville (Ind.) Journal. Nov. 30, 1879. "The Trial was an eminent success."-Boston Traveler. Dec. 2, 1879. "It has been tested with remarkable results Dr. Foote's Health Monthly. December, 1879.

"The Audiphone, for the deaf, is likely to supersede the ear trumpet altogether; is not at all objectionable to carry or to use, and enables thousands who never heard a sound in their lives to distinguish letters, words and music for the first time."—Church Union. November 29, 1879.

"Immense value for the deaf."-The Faderneslandet. Sept., 1879.

"The deaf, who had only heard conversation by its being shouted in a very loud tone or by the use of the ear trumpet, found that they could hear conversation in the ordinary tone with considerable ease."-Providence (R. I.) Journal Report of Experiments in Providence, R. I.

"Has proved a signal success."—Albany (N. Y.) Press.

"Would be easily mistaken for a fan."-Democrat and Chronicle.

"Will practically restore to speech and hearing a large class of afflicted persons."Toronto (Canada) Mail. Dec. 5, 1879.

"Great benefit to those partially deaf."-Providence (R. I.) Journal. Nov 6, 1879. "Earlier reports are fully borne out by later experiments."-Denver Times. December 6, 1879.

"Mr Rhodes was warmly congratulated by the company, and Mr. Peter Cooper spoke of his invention as a blessing and a godsend to the afflicted."-Correspondent's Report of New York Exhibition, in Chicago Inter-Ocean. Nov. 29.

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"A new and ingenious device by which the deaf are enabled to hear through the medium of the teeth."-New York Graphic. Nov. 21, 1879.

"One of the wonders of this day of telephones, phonographs and the like, is the Audiphone, invented by Richard S. Rhodes, of Chicago, which enables deaf people to hear with their teeth. People who have once heard, but have grown deaf, and thus know the meaning of sounds and can talk themselves, practically have perfect hearing restored by the use of the Audiphone."—Springfield Republican.

"Had it in our possession not more than two minutes before we were satisfied that it was at least all that we anticipated, but have since found it to be much superior to anticipations. Besides, we find it to improve by use, also to improve our natural hearing, which is remarkable.". Philadelphia, Nov. 26, 1879.

"With a little practice the sounds thus received are interpreted the same as if they reached the nerves of hearing through the ear."-Scientific American.

The Audiphone is Patented throughout the civilized world.

Conversational, small
Conversational, large

PRICE:

The Audiphone will be sent to any address, on receipt of price, by RHODES & MCCLURE,

Agents for the World,

152 DEARBORN STREET,

$6.00 $6.00

(Audiphonę Parlors, Adjacent to the Office.)

CHICAGO, ILL.

WIT, WISDOM AND ELOQUENCE!

OF

COL. R. G. INGERSOLL,

Illustrated; 8vo, 156 pages, cloth and gold,

PRICE, $1.

INGERSOLL ON THOMAS PAINE

Dr. Goodwin, Bishop Fallows, James Maclaughlin, Prof.
Wilcox, Dr. Hatfield, Dr. Blackburn, Simeon
Gilbert, Pere Hyacinthe, and others.

REPLIES

ΤΟ

INCLUDING, ALSO,

INGERSOLL'S LECTURE ON THOMAS PAINE.
8vo, 153 pages, cloth and gold.
PRICE, $1.

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BY

MISTAKES OF INGERSOLL,

AND HIS

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This volume contains Ingersoll's Lectures,

Mistakes of Moses."

ANSWERS COMPLETE.

"What Shall We Do to be Saved?"

Thomas Paine."

66

"Skulls."

Funeral Oration at His

Brother's Grave," with Comments on same by Henry Ward Beecher, Isaac N. Arnold, and others.

Also, criticisms on all of his lectures, by Prof. Swing, W. H. Ryder, D. D., J. Monro Gibson, D. D., Brooke Herford, D. D., Rabbi Wise, Rev. W. F. Crafts, Chaplain C. C. McCabe, D. D., Arthur Swazy, D. D., Robert Collyer, D. D., Bishop Fallows, Dr. Thomas, Dr. Lorimer, Dr. Courtney, Prof. Courtney, Prof. Curtis, Dr. Godwin. Rev. James McLaughlin, Prof. Wilcox, Dr. Hatfield, Dr. Blackburn, Simeon Gilbert, Pere Hyacinthe, and others.

Elited by J. B. McClure. Beautifully bound in cloth and gold; 8vo, 600 pages. Illustrated.

PRICE, $2.

Any of the above books will be sent by mail, post-paid, on receipt of price.

Rhodes & McClure, Publishers,

CHICAGO ILL,

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D. L. MOODY'S ANECDOTES AND ILLUSTRATIONS.

COMPRISING ALL OF MR. MOODY'S ANECDOTES AND ILLUS-
TRATIONS USED BY HIM IN HIS

Revival Work in Europe and America;

-ALSO

Engravings of Messrs. Moody, Sankey,

Whittle & Bliss, Moody's Church, Chicago Tabernacle, Farwell Hall, Etc.

A handy and handsome volume which many will prize.-New York Evangelist. It is a good insight into the workings and teachings of the great Evangelist. New York Daily Democrat.

A book of anecdotes which have thrilled hundreds of thousands.-Presbyterian Banner.

The book has been compiled by J. B. MCCLURE, whose scholarship and journalistic experience perfectly fits him to do the work discriminately and well.-N. W. Christian Advocate. (Methodist.)

Beautifully bound in cloth and gold; 8 vc., 200 pages. Illustrated.

Price $1.00.

MOODY'S CHILD STORIES;

OR,

STORIES ABOUT CHILDREN.

The universal verdict of press and public is that for juvenile literature, these stories and sketches are unequalled in the language. Purity, pith and point, instructive and entertaining is the character of this work, and it should be in the hands of every child in America.

8 vo., 150 pages, handsomely illustrated. Edited by J. B. MCCLURE.

Price $1.00.

Any of the above books will be sent by mail, post-paid, on re ceipt of price.

Rhodes & McClure, Publishers,

OHICAGO ILL

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