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But more majestic far they stard,

When, side by side, their ranks they form, To wave on high their plumes of green,

And fight their battles with the storm.

God of the light and viewless air!

Where summer breezes sweetly flow, Or, gathering in their angry might,

The fierce and wintry tempests blow; All—from the evening's plaintive sigh,

That hardly lifts the drooping flower, To the wild whirlwind's midnight cry

Breathe forth the language of thy power.

God of the fair and open sky!

How gloriously above us springs The tented dome, of heavenly blue,

Suspended on the rainbow's rings! Each brilliant star, that sparkles through,

Each gilded cloud, that wanders free In evening's purple radiance, gives

The beauty of its praise to thee.

God of the rolling orbs above!

Thy name is written clearly bright In the warm day's unvarying blaze,

Or evening's golden shower of light. For every

fire that fronts the sun, And every spark that walks alone Around the utmost verge of heaven,

Were kindled at thy burning throne.

God of the world! the hour must come,

And nature's self to dust return;

HYMN OF NATURE.

-WHAT IS NOBLE?

317

Her crumbling altars' must decay;

Her incense fires shall cease to burn; But still her grand and lovely scenes

Have made man's warmest praises flow; For hearts grow holier as they trace

The beauty of the world below.

WHAT IS NOBLE.

C. SWAIN.

What is noble ? 'Tis the finer

Portion of our Mind and Heart;
Linked to something still diviner

Than mere language can impart;
Ever prompting--ever seeing

Some improvement yet to plan;
To uplift our fellow being,

And, like man, to feel for Man!

YOU REMEMBER IT--DON'T YOU?

THOMAS H BAYLEY.

You remember the time when I first sought your home, When a smile, not a word, was the summons to come? When you called me a friend, till you found with surprise That our frendship turned out to be love in disguise.

You remember it,- don't you?

You will think of it, -won't you?
Yes, yes, of this the remembrance will last,
L

ng after the present fades into the past.

You remember the grief that grew lighter when shared ?
With the bliss you remember, could aught be compared ?
You remember how fond was my earliest vow?
Not fonder than that which I breathe to thee now.

You remember it, -don't you?

You will think of it,--won't you ?
Yes, yes, of all this the remembrance will last,
Long after the present fades into the past.

REVENGE OF INJURIES.

LADY ELIZABETH CAREW.

HE fairest action of our human life

Is scorning to revenge an injury;
For who forgives without a further strife,

His adversary's heart to him doth tie;
And 'tis a firmer conquest truly said,
To win the heart, than overthrow the head.

If we a worthy enemy do find,

To yield to worth it must be nobly done; But, if of baser metal be his mind,

In base revenge there is no honor won. Who would a worthy courage overthrow ! And who would wrestle with a worthless foe?

We say our hearts are great, and can not yield;

Because they can not yield, it proves them poor: : Great hearts are tasked beyond their power, but seld;

The weakest lion will the loudest roar; Truth's school for certain did this same allow; High-heartedness doth sometimes teach to bow.

A noble heart doth teach a virtuous scorn:

To scorn to owe a duty over long;

To scorn to be for benefits forborne;

To scorn to lie; to scorn to do a wrong;
To scorn to bear an injury in mind;
To scorn a free-born heart slave-like to bind.

But if for wrongs we needs revenge must have,

Then be our vengeance of the noblest kind. Do we his body from our fury save,

And let our hate prevail against his mind? What can'gainst him a greater vengeance be, Than make his foe more worthy far than he?

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