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Milton....

Miller...

169-216 Shaw...

103-143-152-168-275 Sherwood---Moore.. 78-140-234-400 Shelly-

Sigourney Newman.

35

Snowe.. Norton...

19-149

Spenser.. O'Hara----..

189

Sprague Page....

285 Swain. Patmore

122 Sparks.. Peabody

315 Stanley Percy

185

Sternhold..

Steele---Percival.

23

Tiles Pinkney

343

Taylor... Pierpont.

325 Tennyson Pope.....

159-307 Thompson Phelps.

375

“Una” Priest.

385 Proctor....

141 Waller,

Whittier. Richards

311

White.... Riley ---

68-96

Willis. Rogers..

266

Wilcox. Ryan.--

38

Wilson.... Sangster---

75

Wordsworth... Scott...

167

Wilde.. Sears.

339 Shakspere..--- 178-188-195-225 Venable...

99 378 114 333

296 229-260

261 317

80 107 233 130

41

263 -17-93-177-209

289-365

211

29 231

269 331-258

247 291 267 113 163 136

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ILLUSTRATIONS.

Bay of Naples....

FRONTISPIECE. “On Thy Fair Bosom Waveless Stream”

-22 “Touch us Gently, Time'

42 “No Children Run to Lisp their Sire's Return”.

54 “No More Shall the War Cry Sever”.

72 The First Reporter

92 A Shadowy Landscape Dipped in Gold”

.110 “ As a Reed with the Reeds of the River"

132 Bingen on the Rhine

.148 Musical Cherub Soar Singing Away...

164 Minnehaha Falls. “And the Cataract Leaps in Glory" .176 Mother Come Back from the Echoless Shore.

184 Prairie Songsters.

-202 “Light on Thy Hills, Jerusalem !"

-338 The Old Farm Gate

-350 Awe-struck the Silent Children Hear

.374

GEMS OF POETRY.

THE POET'S SONG.

A. TENNYSON.

HE rain had fallen, the Poet arose,

He passed by the town and out of the street, A light wind blew from the gates of the sun,

And waves of shadow went over the wheat,
And he sat him down in a lonely place,

And chanted a melody low and sweet,
That made the wild swan pause in her cloud,

And the lark drop down at his feet.

The swallow stopt as he hunted the bee,

The snake slipt under a spray,

The wild hawk stood with the down on his beak, And stared with his foot on the prey, And the nightingale thought, “I have sung

many songs, But never a one so gay, For he sings of what the world will be

When the years have died away.”

THE WHISTLER.

“You have heard,” said a youth to his sweetheart who

stood, While he sat on a corn-sheaf at daylight's decline“ You have heard of the Danish boy's whistle of wood;

I wish that Danish boy's whistle was mine.”

66 And what would you do with it? Tell me,” she said,

While an arch smile played over her beautiful face, “I would blow it,” he answered, “and then my fair maid

Would fly to my side and there take her place."

Is that all you wish for? That may be yours

Without any magic,” the fair maiden cried ; “A favor so light, one's good nature secures,'

And she playfully seated herself by his side.

“I would blow it again,” said the youth, “and a charm

Would work so that not even modesty's check
Would be able to keep from my

neck
your

fine arm !”
She smiled as she laid her fair arm 'round his neck.

“ Yet once more would I blow, and the magic divine

Would bring me a third time an exquisite blissYou would lay your fair cheek to this brown one of mine,

And your lips stealing past would give me a kiss."

The maiden laughed out in her innocent glee

“What a fool of yourself with a whistle you'd make; For only consider how silly 'twould be

To sit there and whistle for--what you might take.”

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-Northwestern Agriculturist.

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