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II.

DEBATES IN THE HOUSE OF COMMONS.

1510.

Page

March 2. Mr. Whitbread's Motion relative to the Earl of Chatham's Narrative 3

5. Mr. Whitbread's Motion relative to the Earl of Chatham's Narrative

-Adjourned Debate......

2

6. Offices in Reversion .....

8. Vote of Thanks to Lieutenant General Sir Stapleton Cotton and Bri-

gadier General Anson

9. Admiralty Court

Defence of Portugal

15

12. Sir Francis Burdett's Motion for the Release of Mr. John Gale Jones 14

Slave Trade

12

14. Ordnance Estimates

15

16. Ordnance Estimates

10

19. Third Report of the Finance Committee

13

20. Offices in Reversion Bill

18

Mr. Montague

19

22. Vote of Thanks to Sir Robert Wilson ....

18

Treasurer of the Post Office in Ireland

26

23. Lincoln's Inn Benchers-Mr. Farquharson's Petition

27

Estimates of Staff Officers......

39

26. Lincoln's Inn Benchers-Lord Erskine

45

Expedition to the Scheldt

40

27. Mr. Lethbridge's Complaint against Sir Francis Burdett ............... 136

Sir Francis BurdetT to his. CONSTITUENTS; DENYING THE POWER

OP THE HOUSE OF COMMONS TO IMPRISON THE PEOPLE OF ENGLALND 137

Expedition to the Scheldt-Adjourned Debate

194

28. Mr. Lethbridge's Complaint against Sir Francis Burdett-Adjourned

Debate

257

29. Expedition to the Schelde-Adjourned Debate

300
30. Lord Wellington's Answer to the Vote of Tbanks

358
Expedition to the Scheldt-Adjourned Debate

358

April 3. Sir Francis Burdett's Motion respecting Captain Warwick Lake and

Robert Jeffery

426

f. Assessed Taxes

419

Expulsion of Mr. Hunt ......

450

5. Mr. Lethbridge's Complaint against Sir Francis Burdett-Adjourned

Debate

451

Sir Robert Salusbury's Motion for the Commitment of Sir Francis

Burdett to the Tower

547

9. Release of Mr. Jobn Gale Jones...

543

Proceedings respecting the Execution of the Warrant for the Com-

mitment of Sir Francis Burdett

549

Sir Francis Burdett's Letter to the Speaker.....

550

Examination of the Serjeant at Arms ...

551

10. Proceedings respecting the Commitment of Sir Francis Burdett and

his. Letter to the Speaker

592

Exchequer Bills

629

12. Resolutions respecting Mr. Hunt's Securities..........

637

13. Ordnance Department

648

Petition of the East India Company for Relief

634

Sir Francis Burdett's Notice to the Speaker

656

Securities Bill

657

Mr. Parnell's Motion respecting Tythes in Ireland

658

16. Breach of Privilege-Newspaper Parliamentary Reports .......

689

Sir Samuel Romilly's Motion for the Discharge of Mr. John Gale

Jones

691

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1810.

Page

April 17. Petition from Westminster for the Release of Sir Francis Burdett

727

Sir Francis Burdett's Notice to the Speaker

733

Expulsion of Mr. Hunt......

733

Lord Chatham ...

734

19. Dispute with America

7307

Disturbances in the Metropolis, in consequence of the Commitment of

Sir Francis Burdett to the Tower......

737

Captain Foskett's Petition

746

30. King's Message relating to the Duke of Brunswick

757

May 1., Drury Lane Theatre Petition

757

Sicilian Subsidy .............

758

Privately Stealing Bill

762

2. Petition from Middlesex for the Release of Sir Francis Burdett, &c.

780

3. Petition from Middlesex for the Release of Sir Francis Burdett-

Adjourned Debate..............

.... 791

Motion respecting the late Treasurer of the Post Office in Ireland 818

4. Private Bills ........

831

Assessed Taxes

831

Property Tax

832

Exchange of Prisoners .

833

Criminal Laws ......

833

Transport Service

835

East India Affairs ....

836

King's Message relating to the Duke of Brunswick

843

7. The King's Letter to Ferdinand the Seventh .....

854

Sir Francis Burdett's Notices to the Speaker ....

854

Mr. Alderman Combe's Motion respecting the Address of the City of

London to the King

870

King's Message relating to the Duke of Brunswick

879

8. Petition of the Livery of London respecting the Commitment of Sir

Francis Burdett, &C........

885

Mr. Prendergast's Motion respecting the Expedition against the Island

--of Macoa

902

West India Dock Company

913

9. Sir Francis Burdett's Process against the Serjeant at Arms .... 915

Petition from the Livery of London respecting the Commitment of Sir

Francis Burdett, &c.-Adjourned Debate

922

Criminal Laws

944

10. Petition from Reading respecting the Commitment of Sir Francis

Burdett, &c.

949

Petition from Reading respecting a Reform in Parliament

952

Sir Francis Burdett's Process against the Speaker ...

956

Sir Francis Burdett's Process against the Serjeant at Arms

956

Captain Foskett ....

957

11. Sir Francis Burdett's Notice to the Earl of Moira

969

Proceedings respecting Sir Francis Burdett's Notices....

969

Navy Estimates

1005

14. Affairs of the East India Company

1017

Major Cartwright's Petition for Reform in Parliament, &c.

1020

Duke of Brunswick's Annuity

1031

15. Dispute with America ....

..... 1039

,1043

14. Duke of Brunswick's Annuity Bill

...... 1077

Finance Resolutions-Sinecure Places.....

.... 1083

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KING's Message respecting an Annuity to the Duke of Brunswick

757

PAPERS RELATING TO THE EXPEDITION TO THE Scheldt-Concluded from Ap-
pendix to Vol. 16.

.... Appendir

Copy of the Earl of Chatham's Statement of his Proceedings; dated

i5th October 1809. Presented to the King, 14th February 1810. 1106
Papers relating to Rear Admiral Sir Richard J. Strachan, Bart. ...

...... 1115

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VI. LISTS.

List of the Minority in the House of Lords, March 2, on the Marquis of Lans-

down's Motion relative to the King's Answer to the City of London

respecting the Expedition to the Scheldt
of the Minority and also of the Majority in the House of Commons, March

30, on Lord Porchester's Motion relative to the Expedition to the Scheldt 422
of the Minority in the House of Commons, April 5, on Sir Robert Salus-

bury's Motion for the Commi'ment of Sir Francis Burdett to the Tower 547
- • of the Minority in the House of Commons, April 13, on Mr. Parnell's Mo-
tion respecting Tythes in Ireland ....................

689
of the Minority in the House of Commons, May 1, on the Privately Steal-
ing Bill ...

780

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THE

Parliamentary Debates

During the Fourth Session of the Fourth Parliament of the

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and of the Kingdom of Great Britain the Twenty-first, appointed to meet at Westminster, the Twenty-third Day of January, 1810, in the Fiftieth Year of the Reign of His Majesty King GEORGE the Third. [Sess. 1810.

HOUSE OF LORDS.

(The King's Answer to the City of Friday, March 2, 1810.

LONDON RESPECTING The ExpeditION TO

THE SCHELDT.] The order of the day (CORN DISTILLATION PROHIBITION Bill.) having been read, the marquis of LansUpon the order of the day being read, that down desired, as a preliminary step, that the House do go into a Committee upon the Narrative presented by lord Chatham this Bill,

to his Majesty might be read. The Nar. The Earl of Hardwicke, in pursuance of rative was accordingly read by the clerk, the notice be gave yesterday, conceived it upon which, his duty to propose a limited period for The Marquis of Lunsdown rose to subthe duration of the bill now before their mit the motion of which he had given fordships. He had been induced to adopt notice for a previous day, to the considerathis mode of conduct, in consequence of tion of their lordships. He had postponed the defect of information, how far this his motion on the former day, in consemeasure would be expedient for the in quence of the noble earl, the author of the terests of the country. If the present bill Narrative, having to attend in another were limited to the duration of three place, but he had hoped that on this day months, it would afford the House an op- the noble earl would have been in his portunity of examining the documents place. He had thought it, however, his which had previously been moved for, duty to desire that the Narrative should and which would enable their lordships to be read, in order that their lordships might form a correct opinion upon the policy of be in full possession of its contents. It the measure; he should therefore move was deeply to be regretted, that the author the alteration accordingly, in order that of the Narrative should have attempted to the bill miglit expire in May, and not in cast a blot upon that profession, to weaken September.

public confidence in which was to darken Earl Bathurst expressed his doubt whe. The horizon and to dim the prospects of ther this alteration would answer its in- the country. He did not mean now to tended purport; and he really apprehend enter into a discussion of the policy and ed, that persons interested in the event of the conduct of the calamitous Expedition this bill passing into a law, would thereby to the Scheldt, that must be reserved till be thrown into such uncertainty as would another opportunity; he should therefore be materially injurious to their interest. in the present instance confine himself to

The amendment was then proposed, a very limited object. The author of the when a division took place for the Narrative which their lordships bad just Amendment 18; Against it 21; Majority heard read, was one of his Majesty's mi-3. The bill afterwards passed through nisters, with whom his colleagues had the Committee.

daily opportunities of communication; Vol. XVI.

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and from whom, having these daily op- , upon that most important and valuable ser. portunities of communication, it was to be vice.--It would be recollected also, that supposed his colleagues must have learnt the ministers who had thus advised bis those circumstances detailed in the Nar- Majesty to refuse inquiry into the petition rative, each of which imperiously demand of his subjects, where inquiry was so impeed inquiry; an inquiry, however, had riously demanded, were the same ministers, been deemed unnecessary by his Majes- who, on a former occasion, when a petity's confidential servants. It had happen. tion from the same corporation called for ed that a corporation amongst the first in inquiry into the disgraceful affair of the the country in importance and dignily, convention of Cintra, had advised his Mahad assembled, for the purpose of consi- jesty to reprove the citizens of London for dering of a petition to his Majesty, that thus coming to ask for inquiry, and to he would be graciously pleased to direct state, that his Majesty was desirous at all an immediate and effectual inquiry into times to institute inquiry, where, as in that the causes of the calamitous failure which case, the hopes and expectations of the nabad attended the Walcheren Expedition, tion had been disappointed. The same and had determined upon one to that ministers too, who when intending to move effect, which, in speaking the opinion of the thanks of parliament to a naval comzhat corporation, also spoke the decided manding officer, upon only bearing it intiand unanimous opinion of the whole coun- mated that an officer who commanded a try. It had happened also that from some single ship in the fleet intended, not to circumstances, a considerable interval prefer a charge, but to oppose the Vote of elapsed between the determination to pre. Thanks, immediatoly instituted a court sent this petition and the delivery of it, martial upon the officer in command, yet, giving his Majesty's ministers still further who had refused inquiry in the case of time to inform themselves of the real cir- this calamitous Expedition to the Scheldt, cumstances attending that Expedition. where so many circumstances demanded Was it to be believed, then, that for three it where it was called for to clear the months from the time of the arrival of the character of the navy froin the reproach noble carl, the author of the Narrative, in cast upon it by the author of the Narrathis country, in September, and the period tive-where it was called for by the geneof delivering the petition to which he had ral voice and the universal feeling of the alluded, in December, his Majesty's mi. country. Did his Majesty's ministers innisters should have had no communication lend 10 shield themselves under his Ma. with their colleague, relative to the cir- jesty's sacred name and authority? He cumstances which had caused the failure trusted the country would not be deceived of the Expedition ? Was it to be believed, by such an artifice, nor suffer them to take that when every voice in England was advantage of the sanctuary of a temple lifted up to demand inquiry into the causes profaned by such unhallowed steps, and of these calamities wbich bad afflicted the polluted by such hands. Was it to becountry—that when every mind in Eng- lieved, that they were ignorant of the senland was intent upon the calamitous cir- timents and opinions of the author of the cumstances of this Expedition—that there Narrative ? was it to be believed, that, should be nine or ten individuals wholly having daily opportunities of communi. indifferent to these calamities, and wholly cation with the noble earl, the author of regardless of the public feeling and the the Narrative, one of their colleagues, the public anxiety, and wholly negligent in master general of the ordnance, and the inquiring into the causes of these evils so military commander in chief of the Expegenerally deplored and that these nine or dition, they should bave neglected to have len individuals should be his Majesty's required him to give them all the informaministers? - Yet their lordships would find, tion in his power upon the subject of the by the Answer given to the city of Lon. Expedition, that they should with all their don, that his Majesty's ministers had ad opportunities of information and explana. vised bis Majesty 10 say, that he had not lion, have remained in uller ignorance of deemed it necessary to institute any in the opinions and sentiments of their colquiry; and this notwithstanding all the leagues, in ulter ignorance even of many circumstances detailed in the Narrative, material facts relating to this Expedition? and which so loudly demanded an inquiry He could not believe that it was in this for the sake of the navy, to remove that utter ignorance of the facts and circumstain which had been attempted to be cast stances stated by their colleague in his

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