Collins's Peerage of England; Genealogical, Biographical, and Historical, Volumen 3

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F. C. and J. Rivington, Otridge and son, 1812
 

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Página 121 - EPITAPH. ON THE COUNTESS OF PEMBROKE. UNDERNEATH this sable hearse Lies the subject of all verse, Sidney's sister, Pembroke's mother : Death, ere thou hast slain another, Fair, and learned, and good as she, Time shall throw a dart at thee.
Página 566 - A fiery soul, which, working out its way, Fretted the pigmy body to decay, And o'er-informed the tenement of clay...
Página 392 - Answer to Mr. Whiston's Letter to him concerning the Eternity of the Son of God, and of the Holy Ghost.
Página 568 - He sought the storms ; but for a calm unfit, Would steer too nigh the sands, to boast his wit Great wits are sure to madness near allied, And thin partitions do their bounds divide; Else, why should he, with wealth and honour blest, Refuse his age the needful hours of rest?
Página 567 - Bartering his venal wit for sums of gold, He cast himself into the saint-like mould ; Groan'd, sigh'd, and pray'd, while godliness was gain, The loudest bagpipe of the squeaking train.
Página 594 - Surrey and the heirs male of his body and for default of such issue...
Página 559 - God forbid that I should justify you : Till I die I will not remove mine integrity from me. My righteousness I hold fast, and will not let it go : My heart shall not reproach me so long as I live.
Página 332 - I'll go with her willingly. Nothing can be more affecting and melancholy to me than what I see here: yet he takes my visit so kindly, that I should have lost one great pleasure, had I not come. I have nothing more to say, as I have nothing in my mind but this present object, which indeed is extraordinary. This man was never born to die like other men, any more than to live like them.
Página 532 - The house, generally," says he, "was exceedingly disposed to please the king, and to do him service." " It could never be hoped," he observes elsewhere, "that more sober or dispassionate men would ever meet together in that place, or fewer who brought ill purposes with them.
Página 128 - No ceremony was omitted of bridecakes, points, garters, and gloves, which have been ever since the livery of the Court ; and at night there was sewing into the sheet, casting off the bride's left hose, with many other petty sorceries.

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