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in my

D to L.

P. 66, 1. 10. shaken, A, B, F to 1.; and so above, p. 8, l. 28; shaked, c, D, E. P. 66, 1. 11.

days] In K, L, these words are connected with what follows ; in A to J, M, they are connected with what precedes :—the punctuation in the text will suit either construction, both giving an equally good sense.

P. 66, 1. 27. Methuselah] There is no variation in the spelling here. See p. 40, 1. II.

P. 66, 1. 29. worser] Q reads worse, but worser occurs again below, p. 191, 1. ult.

P. 67, l. 2. agree, A to H; agrees, i to L.
P. 67, l. 3. at forty, A, B, C, m; as at forty, D to L.
P. 67, 1. 3. the circumstance, A, B, C, M; that circumstance,
P. 67, 1. 9. proceeds] D has precedes, corrected in E to proceeds,

P. 67, 1. 13. And though, &c.] In A, B and the MSS. the remainder of this section, and the whole of the next, are wanting, and the following passage occurs :-“The course and order of my life would be a very death to others : I use my selfe to all dyets, humours, ayres, hunger, thirst, cold, heate, want, plenty, necessity, dangers, hazards; when I am cold, I cure not my selfe by heate; when sicke, not by physicke; those that know how I live, may justly say, I regard not life, nor stand in fear of death.

P. 67, l. 17. Cicero's ground ] Referring probably to De Senect. c. 23. “Neque me vixisse pænitet ; quoniam ita vixi, ut non frustra me natum existimem."

P. 67, 1. 19. instruct] J reads instructs.

P. 67, 1. 21. makes] Some modern edd. read make, without authority or necessity. See note above, p. 34, 1. 21.

P. 68, 1. 6. glome] 0, Q have gloom, which is adopted by Wilkin (r), and also by some moitern editors, although Gar. diner (w) has explained the word glome in his Glossary.

P. 68. 1. 6. glome or bottom of our days] So below, p. 102, 1. 2, “the thread of his own days.” George Herbert, in a letter to his mother quoted in Walton's Lise (p. 299, ed. 1825), says, I have always observed the thread of life to be like other threads or skeins of silk, full of snarles and incumbrances. Happy is he, whose bottom is wound up, and laid ready for work in the New Jerusalem.'

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P. 65, 1. 22. the Testament of Diogenes] “Who willed his friend not to bury him, but to hang him up with a staffe in his hand to fright away the crowes. (Note by Sir T. B.) See Cicero, Tusc. Quæst. i. 43.

P. 65, 1. 22. nor do I ] A, B, J omit I.
P. 65, 1. 23. allow, A, B, C, K, L; follow, v to J, M.
P. 65, 1. 30.

neatest way, C, D, K, L ; nearest way, A, B, E to I; nearest, J. This is almost the only place in which the reading of D is superior to that of E. See above, p. 14, 1. 3, and below, p. 109, 1. 27.

P.65, 1. penult. I do not envy, &c.] As Theophrastus did, who dying, accused Nature for giving them, to whom it could not be of any concernment, so large a life; and to man, whom it much concerned, so short a one. Cicero, Tusc. Quæst. iii. 69. (Keck.)

P. 65, l. ult. Crows and Daws] See Pseud, Epid. iii. 9, where Sir T. B. quotes Pliny's words :- “ Hesiodus. . cornici novem nostras attribuit ætates, quadruplum ejus cervis, id triplicatum corvis.” (Hist. Nat. vii. 48 [49].)

P. 66, 1. 2. a Jubilee) “The Jewish computation for fifty years.". (Note in one of the MSS.)

P. 66, 1. 3. one revolution of Saturn] “ The planet Saturn maketh his revolution once in thirty years.” (Note in one of the MSS.)

P. 66, 1.4 nor hath my pulse beat thirty years] Hence, as Browne was born in Oct. 1605, it would appear that the Religio Medici was written about the year 1635. See the note on p. 4, 1. 8, and on p. 115, 1. 22.

P. 66, 1. 5. excepting one] Christian IV., King of Denmark, who began to reign in 1588, seventeen years before Browne's birth, and who was still alive when this sentence was written,

P. 66, 1. 5. ashes] Q, and other modern edd., insert of.

P. 66, 1. 7. three Emperors, &c.] See Chronology of Sir T. B.'s life prefixed to this ed.

P. 66, 1. 7. four . Popes) viz. Leo XI., Paul V., Gregory XV., and Urban VIII. But (as Wilkin observes) in reckoning himself contemporary with Leo, Sir T. B. must have proceeded on his own fanciíul principle of computation, that "every man is some months elder than he bethinks him”

(p. 63, 1. 10), for in fact Leo died nearly six months before Sir T. B.

in my

D to L.

P. 66, 1. 10. shaken, A, B, F to 1.; and so above, p. 8, I. 28; shaked, C, D, E. P, 66, 1. II.

days] In K, L, these words are connected with what follows ; in A to J, M, they are connected with what precedes :—the punctuation in the text will suit either construction, both giving an equally good sense.

Ph6,l.27 Methuselah There is no variation in the spelling here, See p. 40, l. 11.

P. 66, l. 29. worser] Q reads worse, but worser occurs again below, p. 191, l. ult.

P.67I. agree, A to H; agrees, i to L.
POZI at forty, A, B, C, M; as at forty, D to L.
POIŻ the circumstance, ABC Mithat circumstance
PO7l. proceeds)phas precedes, correcteding to proceeds

POII And though, &c.] In A, B and the MSS. the remainder of this section, and the whole of the next, are want. ing, and the following passage occurs :-“The course and order of my life would be a very death to others : I use my selfe to all dyets, humours, ayres, hunger, thirst, cold, heate, want, plenty, necessity, dangers, hazards; when I am cold, I cure not my selfe by heate; when sicke, not by physicke; those that know how I live, may justly say, I regard not life, nor stand in fear of death.”

P. 67, l. 17. Cicero's ground ] Referring probably to De Senect. c. 23.

'Neque me vixisse pænitet ; quoniam ita vixi, ut non frustra me natum existimem.”

P. 67, 1. 19. instruct) , reads instructs.

P. Olai makes] Some modern edd. read make without authority or necessity. See note above, p. 34, 1. 21.

P. 68, 1. 6. glome] 0, Q have gloom, which is adopted by Wilkin (T), and also by some moltern editors, although Gar. diner (w) has explained the word glome in his Glossary.

P. 68. 1. 6. glome or bottom of our days] So below, p. 102, 1. 2, “the thread of his own days.” George Herbert, in a letter to his mother quoted in Walton's Life (p. 299, ed. 1825), says, “I have always observed the thread of life to be like other threads or skeins of silk, full of snarles and incumbrances. Happy is he, whose bottom is wound up, and laid ready for work in the New Jerusalem.”

P. 69, l. 3.

this breath, c to J; the breath, A, B ; his breath,

K, L.

P. 70,

P. 69, 1. 23. to it, d to L; unto it, A, B, C.

P. 69, l. 24. Emori, &c.] A line of Epicharmus, quoted (and probably translated) by Cicero, Tusc. Quæs. i. 8.

P. 69, l. 24: curo] Gardiner (w), without authority, reads æstumo, which, however, is the reading of Cicero, and is required by the metre.

P. 69, 1. 26. Cæsar] Suetonius represents Julius Cæsar as preferring a sudden and unexpected death. Jul. Cæsar, c. 87.

P. 69, 1. 29. disease] The remainder of the section is wanting in A, B and the MSS.

P. 70, 1. 9. beholding] beholden, J.

P. 70, 1. 11. though it be in the power, &c.] alluding to the lines of Seneca :

' Eripere vitam nemo non homini potest;

At nemo mortem.”—Theb. 152.) 1.

13. God would not, &c.] In this obscure sentence the simplest punctuation has been followed, in order that the reader may put his own interpretation on the words. Peace (v) and others place a semicolon after flesh, and thereby connect the clause the misery flesh with what precedes ; while these same words are by the editor of Q, Wilkin (T), and others, who place a semicolon after that, referred to the clause that follows. According to Wilkin that in l. 14 refers to death, according to Peace it refers to the misery, &c.; and again that in l. 15 means according to Peace what; according to Wilkin it means who. In both cases Wilkin's view is probably the more correct : the Latin Translation appears to be right in the first part of the sentence, but wrong in the end :-“ Hinc Deus Ipse Se non exemit; nec enim in carne immortalis esse, nec quod in ea immortale erat suscipere voluit.”

P. 70, 1. 15. that was, K,L; that was in it, C to J; what was

P. 70, 1. 24 the Stoic is in the right] in holding death to be no evil.

this literal, a to H; the literal, i to L. P. 71, 1. 2. Horæ combustą] "That time when the moon is in conjunction, and obscured by the sun, the astrologers call

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in it, Q.

P. 70, 1. 27.

.

me,

P. 71, 1. 30. nor shall, K, L; nor will, A to J.
P. 71, 1. penult. so is its, C, M; so its, A, B, D to L.

P. 72, l. 5. Some believe, &c.] Moltke refers to St. Augustine De Genesi ad Liter., iv. 22, &c. et De Civit. Dei, xi. 7.

P. 72, ll. 5 8. Some . then] A, B, and all the MSS. have I.

(Wilkin.) P. 72, l. 10. the great work of the intellect] Wilkin (r), and others read that great work in the intellect, on the authority of the MSS.- -an improvement of the text, but not absolutely necessary. The Latin version has, magni illius operis ideam in Divina mente expressam.

P. 72, l. 27. Elias, A to L; Elias's, M, which is adopted by Q, and most modern editors ; Peace (v) has Elias'. See above, p. 58, l. 31, and below, p. 99, 1. 3.

P. 72, 1. 27. six thousand year's) Alluding to a tradition that the world would last so long, contained in the following passage in the Talmud :-“It is a tradition of the house (school) of Elijah : The world exists 6,000 years : 2,000, confusion; 2,000, Thorah (Mosaic law); 2,000, the days of Messiah.” (Quoted by Delitzsch in his Comment, on the Hebrews, vol. i. p. 383, Engl. Transl. 1868. Wilkin also refers to Raymundi Pugio Fidei, ji. 10, § 1, p. 9394, ed. 1687.) Sir T, B. mentions this “prophecy of Elias in other places (see Pseud. Epid. vi. 1., vol. ii. p. 109; Urn Burial, ch. 5, vol. iii. p. 43, ed. Bohn); and also refers to the period of six thousand years without naming Elias (see above, p. 68, 1. 19; and below, p. 190, 1. 6; 230, 15). Keck notices that the same opinion as to the duration of the world was held also by Lactantius (see Divin. Instit. vii, 14).

P. 72, b. antep. the Devil of Delphos] “The oracle of Apollo.” (Note in one of the MSS.)

P. 73, 1. 3. or present] Wilkin (T) reads nor present, on the authority of A, B.

P. 73, l. 6. to fulfil old prophecies] "In those days there shall come lyars and false prophets.” (Note by Sir T. B.).

P. 73, 1. 7. the authors, c to I, K, L; authour, A, B; authors, J. P. 73, 11. 15-18. is as antichrist is] wanting in A, B.

P. 73, 1. 17. to speak freely, &c.] Wilkin, on the authority of the MSS., reads the following clause thus : to speak freely Comit

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