Imágenes de página
PDF
ePub
[graphic]
[ocr errors]

Haa

[ocr errors]

IIUGIE'S CITY IIIGII SCHICOI., CINCINNATI

Plans of Hughes' City Higu School of CINCINNATI. The Hughes City High School is one of two Public High Schools, sustained partly out of two trust estates, known as the “ Woodward" and “Hughes” Funds, by the City of Cincinnati, as part of its system of public instruction. This system has grown up to its present extent and usefulness since 1928-9, when Col. Andrew Mack carried through the Legislature of Ohio, a bill for a special act, imposing a tax of $7,000 upon the city, for the erection of suitable buildings in the several wards, and an annual tax of $7,000 in each subsequent year, which, together with the State appropriation, was to be applied to the support of common schools. Under this act, the system was commenced, and in 1834, it was better grounded and greatly extended by an act authorizing the City Council to build substantial school-houses, and to provide for the support of common schools therein at the expense of the city. Accordingly, the city was divided into districts, and in the course of four years nine buildings were erected, at an expense of $96,000—which, in location, size, and arrangement, were greatly in advance of the then gen erally received notices of school architecture. From year to year the number of houses has been increased, to meet the demands of the growing population, and the style and fixtures greatly improved. The care of the schools is committed to a Board of Trustees and Visitors, one for each ward, elected by the legal voters thereof.

In 1845, the board were authorized to establish schools of different grades, and in 1847, a Central High School was organized under the charge of Prof. H. H. Barney, who has just (1853,) been elected State Superintendent of Common Schools.

In 1850, the Legislature authorized the appointment of a Superintendent of Common Schools, “whose duty it should be to visit and superintend all the common schools of the city, and, under the direction of the board of trustees and visitors of common schools, to establish such course of studies, rules, and regulations as may be deemed best calculated to promote the progress and well being of said schools."

In 1852, the Woodward and Hughes Funds, amounting to $300,000, and yielding an annual income of over $6,000, were united for the purpose of sustaining two High Schools, in different sections of the citywith the same requisites for admission and course of study, and open to both sexes.

For the Hughes City High School a lot on Fifth-street was purchased for $18,000, and a building, of which the following diagrams present the size, and internal accommodations, was completed in 1853, at an expense of $20,000.

The system of Public Instruction in Cincinnati, embraces :

I. District schools-one for each of the twelve districts, into which the city is divided for school purposes. Each school is classified into four sections or grades, and the pupils pass from the lowest to the next highest on examination, which is held twice a year. In 1850, there were 6,740 pupils, under 148 teachers, of whom 124 were females.

II. German English Schools—three in number, are intended for the special accommodations of children born of German parents-and who are taught both the German and English language. In 1850, there were three schools, twenty-four teachers, and twenty-three hundred pupils.

III. Evening Schools. Cincinnati was one of the first cities to provide this class of schools for children who could not attend the day schools, and for adults whose early education had been neglected. In 1850, there were six schools, open five evenings in the week from October to February, with about six hundred pupils.

IV. High Schools--of which there are now (1853) two.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Fig. 4.-Second Floor.

80.0

Pig. 5.--THIRD FLOOR.

LECTURE

ROOM O

60.0

CELLAR FURNACE ROON

25.6

Coal & Wood CELLAR

25.6

PHILOSOPNICAL HALL

3.2.6

NUM.

SPEAKERS
ROD

Ul. 9.

ANIE
ROOM

13.

21.4

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

PLANS OF Woodward High School. This beautiful building, in the Tudor style of architecture, is located on a lot bounded on the north by Franklin street, on the south by Woodward street, between Broadway and Sycamore streets. It is constructed of brick, with solid buttresses running the height of the building and terminating with ornamental pinacles. The windows are of rich tracery, but sufficiently massive to give an idea of strength,--and quite unlike the cobweb effect usually produced by cast iron imitations of stone. The external decorations are very rich, and possess those bold and artistic outlines so peculiar to the style. The roof is of singular but pleasing construction, steep and lofty, covered entirely with cut slates, which give a rich appearance, and fringed with ornamental ridge work. In conception, and execution, it is unquestionably the most correct architectural specimen of this class of collegiate buildings which has yet been produced in our Western States.

The basement, which is lofty and well-lighted, comprises philosophical and apparatus rooms, large and well-regulated chambers for the heating apparatus, fuel, &c.; and the approach to it is by a continuance of the grand staircases, rendering this portion of the building as accessible and well-ventilated and lighted as any other.

« AnteriorContinuar »