The Languages of Political Theory in Early-Modern Europe

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Anthony Pagden
Cambridge University Press, 28 jun. 1990 - 360 páginas
This volume studies the concept of a political 'language', of a discourse composed of shared vocabularies, idioms and rhetorical strategies, which has been widely influential on recent work in the history of political thought. The collection brings together a number of essays by a distinguished group of international scholars, on the four dominant languages in use in Europe between the end of the fourteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth century. They are: the language of political Aristotelianism and the natural law; the language of classical republicanism; the language of commerce and the commercial society; and the language of a science of politics. Each author has chosen a single aspect of his or her language, sometimes the work of a single author, in one case the history of a single team, and shown how it determined the shape and development of that language, and the extent to which each language was a response to the challenge of other modes of discourse.
 

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Índice

J G A POCOCK The concept of a language and the métier
19
NICOLAI RUBINSTEIn The history of the word politicus in
41
the
57
the
79
RICHARD TUCK The modern theory of natural law
99
QUENTIN SKINNER Sir Thomas Mores Utopia and the
123
MAURIZIO VIROLI The concept of ordre and the language of
159
ECO HAITSMA MULIER The language of seventeenth
179
MARK GOLDIE The civil religion of James Harrington
197
Antonio
277
GIGLIOLA ROSSINI The criticism of rhetorical histori
303
ROBERT WOKLER SaintSimon and the passage from
325
JUDITH N SHKlar Alexander Hamilton and the language
339
Index
356
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Sobre el autor (1990)

Anthony Pagden is Harry C. Black Professor of History at the Johns Hopkins University.

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