The Masks of Anthony and Cleopatra

Portada
University of Delaware Press, 2006 - 605 páginas
The Masks of Anthony and Cleopatra follows the pattern of Marvin Rosenberg's four earlier Masks books and offers a sensitive interpretation of the play based on extensive reading of both literary criticism and performance reviews.
In the middle of this play of clashing values and great conflicting personalities, the unhappy Octavia - sister of the ambitious Octavius Caesar and newly married to the heroic Mark Anthony - sums up the ambiguity of her divided world in her heart-wrenching lament:
Husband win, win brother, Prays and destroys the prayer; no midway 'Twixt these extremes at all.
In his analysis, Marvin Rosenberg sets out to steer a path between the "extremes" of Rome and Egypt and all they stand for: and to explore the relentless "to and back" confrontation of their different sets of values which leads ultimately to destruction.
What his study reveals is a world of endless oppositions and ambiguities. Reason (policy and expediency) is pitted against emotion (love and enduring relationship); the personal and private is balanced against the public and universal; the human is juxtaposed with the divine, the heroic set against the mundane and petty. Great complex characters oppose each other and are divided within themselves, both on the wide stage of the world and within their own personalities. The language is full of antithesis and oxymorons: and the most magnificent poetry is placed alongside the most simple and moving of expressions.

Dentro del libro

Comentarios de usuarios - Escribir una reseña

No hemos encontrado ninguna reseña en los sitios habituales.

Índice

Act I Scene i
41
Anthony
70
Cleopatra
80
Act I Scene ii
86
Act I Scene iii
104
Octavius
118
Act I Scene iv
123
Act I Scene v
133
Act III Scene xiii
293
Act Four
315
Act IV Scene i
317
Act IV Scene ii
320
Act IV Scene iii
326
Act IV Scene iv
329
Act IV Scene v
335
Act IV Scene vi
337

Act Two
143
Act II Scene i
145
Act II Scene ii
151
Act II Scene iii
174
Act II Scene iv
180
Act II Scene v
181
Act II Scene vi
197
Act II Scene vii
207
Act Three
225
Act III Scene i
227
Act III Scene ii
231
Act III Scene iii
239
Act III Scene iv
246
Act III Scene v
251
Act III Scene vi
254
Act III Scene vii
262
Act III Scenes viii ix and x
272
Act III Scene xi
278
Act III Scene xii
288
Act IV Scene vii
341
Act IV Scene viii
344
Act IV Scene ix
349
Act IV Scenes x xi xii and xiii
352
Act IV Scene xiv
362
Act IV Scene xv
379
Act Five
393
Act V Scene i
395
Act V Scene ii
403
Is Anthony and Cleopatra a Tragedy?
473
Epilogue
480
A Note on the Historical Cleopatra 69 BC30 BC
482
Critical and Theatrical Bibliographies
489
Critical Bibliography
491
Theatrical Bibliography
532
Tributes from Marvin Rosenbergs Colleagues and Friends
595
Index
597
Página de créditos

Otras ediciones - Ver todo

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 167 - The barge she sat in, like a burnish'd throne, Burn'd on the water ; the poop was beaten gold, Purple the sails, and so perfumed that The winds were love-sick with them, the oars were silver, Which to the tune of flutes kept stroke, and made The water which they beat to follow faster, As amorous of their strokes.
Página 170 - Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale Her infinite variety : other women cloy The appetites they feed, but she makes hungry, Where most she satisfies ; for vilest things Become themselves in her, that the holy priests Bless her when she is riggish.
Página 64 - I'll kneel down, And ask of thee forgiveness. So we'll live, And pray, and sing, and tell old tales, and laugh At gilded butterflies, and hear poor rogues Talk of court news ; and we'll talk with them too, Who loses,- and who wins ; who's in, who's out ; And take...
Página 211 - It is shaped, sir, like itself, and it is as broad as it hath breadth ; it is just so high as it is, and moves with it own organs ; it lives by that which nourisheth it ; and the elements once out of it, it transmigrates.
Página 129 - Which beasts would cough at ; thy palate then did deign The roughest berry on the rudest hedge ; Yea, like the stag, when snow the pasture sheets, The barks of trees thou browsed'st ; on the Alps It is reported thou didst eat strange flesh, Which some did die to look on ; and all this, It wounds thine honour that I speak it now, Was borne so like a soldier, that thy cheek So much as lank'd not.
Página 62 - Of the rang'd empire fall ! Here is my space. Kingdoms are clay: our dungy earth alike Feeds beast as man : the nobleness of life Is, to do thus; when such a mutual pair, And such a twain can do 't, in which I bind, On pain of punishment, the world to weet We stand up peerless.
Página 24 - Our women are defective, and so sized, You'd think they were some of the guard disguised ; For to speak truth, men act, that are between Forty and fifty, wenches of fifteen ; With bone so large, and nerve so incompliant, When you call Desdemona, enter giant.
Página 146 - We, ignorant of ourselves, Beg often our own harms, which the wise powers Deny us for our good ; so find we profit, By losing of our prayers.
Página 303 - But when we in our viciousness grow hard, (O misery on't !) the wise gods seel our eyes ; In our own filth drop our clear judgments ; make us Adore our errors ; laugh at us, while we strut To our confusion.

Sobre el autor (2006)

Marvin Rosenberg joined the Berkeley faculty in 1949, teaching first journalism and then Theatre Arts. He retired officially in 1983, but when he died in February 2003 he was Professor Emeritus in the Department of Theater, Dance and Performance Studies and still actively teaching and writing.

Información bibliográfica