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A LATE SHORT ADMINISTRATION.

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obtained no reversions or pensions, either coming in or going out, for themselves, their families, or their dependents.

In the prosecution of their measures they were traversed by an opposition of a new and singular character ; an opposition of place-men and pensioners. They were supported by the confidence of the nation. And having held their offices under many difficulties and discouragements, they left them at the express command, as they had accepted them at the earnest request, of their royal master.

These are plain facts; of a clear and publick nature; neither extended by elaborate reasoning, nor heightened by the colouring of eloquence. They are the services of a single year.

The removal of that administration from power, is not to them premature ; since they were in office long enough to accomplish many plans of publick utility ; and, by their perseverance and resolution, rendered the way smooth and easy to their successours; having left their king and their country in a much better condition than they found them. By the temper they manifest, they seem to have now no other wish, than that their successours may do the publick as real and as faithful service as they have done.

OBSERVATIONS

ON A

LATE PUBLICATION,

INTITULED,

THE PRESENT STATE OF THE NATION.

" O Tite, si quid ego adjuvero curamve levasso,

Quæ nunc te coquit, et versat sub pectore fixa, • Ecquid erit pretii?

Enn. ap. Cic.

1769.

VOL. I.

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ARTY divisions, whether on the whole operating for good or evil, are things inseparable from free government. This is a truth which, I believe, admits little dispute, having been established by the uniform experience of all ages. The part a good citizen ought to take in these divisions, has been a matter of much deeper controversy, But God forbid, that any controversy relating to our essential morals should admit of no decision. It appears to me, that this question, like most of the others which regard our duties in life, is to be determined by our station in it. Private men may be wholly neutral, and entirely innocent; but they who are legally invested with publick trust, or stand on the high ground of rank and dignity, which is trust implied, can hardly in any case remain indifferent, without the certainty of sinking into insignificance; and thereby in effect deserting that post in which, with the fullest authority, and for the wisest purposes, the laws and institutions of their country have fixed them. However, if it be the office of those who are thus circumstanced, to take a decided part, it is no less their duty that it should be a sober one. It ought to be circumscribed by the same laws of decorum, and balanced by the same temper, which bound and regulate all the

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