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TO THE

PUPILS OF GUY'S HOSPITAL,

FOR WHOSE USE IT IS MORE ESPECIALLY WRITTEN,

THIS LITTLE WORK,

PRODUCED FROM MATERIALS PRINCIPALLY
THERE COLLECTED,

IS AFFECTIONATELY INSCRIBED,

BY THEIR SINCERE FRIEND,

THE AUTHOR.

PREFACE.

THE object of the present work, for while so many books on Auscultation already exist, it may be necessary to explain the object of a fresh candidate for public favour,—will be perhaps best explained by a sketch of conversations, in which I have on several occasions taken part, and from which the notion of writing it may be stated to have in great measure originated.

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"I want, Sir, to learn something about Auscultation," a pupil has said to me; "what book would you advise me to read ?" The book of nature, Sir; go to the bed-side, and to the inspection room." "Yes! but I know nothing about it, and I want some little information beforehand." "Certainly! Read Andral, Bouillaud, Laennec with Forbes' notes, Hope, Stokes, Williams. "Oh! but I have not time to read half of them, or

perhaps really to study one of them. I only just want something to give me a little insight into the matter, and then I mean to work away in the wards." "Then look over Martinet's Manual,

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or get Sharpe's little compilation, or Spittall, or Cowan's Bedside Manual, or Dr. Newbigging's translation of the exquisite little work by Barthe and Roger." 'Well! I have got one of those you mention, but I can make nothing out of it. There is such a profusion of terms, such lots of 'bruits and râles,' that I cannot get on at all. I wish you would write a book that beginners could make use of; it is really much wanted for pupils, and for other persons who have been out of the way of clinical instruction for some years."

In conversations to this effect I have on several occasions taken part. Whatever, therefore, may be thought of the judgment of the individuals in applying to myself to relieve them of their difficulties, and howsoever such an application may be regarded, as a mere incense-offering to my self-complacency, the difficulties complained of I have presumed to be real. I know indeed that, after the perusal of works especially treating of diseases of the chest, pupils, and practitioners too, are often quite incapable of instituting an ordinary

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