Facts and Fancies for the Curious from the Harvest-fields of Literature: A Melange of Excerpta

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J.B. Lippencott Company, 1905 - 647 páginas

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Página 601 - For woman is not undevelopt man, But diverse : could we make her as the man, Sweet Love were slain : his dearest bond is this, . Not like to like, but like in difference. Yet in the long years liker must they grow ; The man be more of woman, she of man ; He gain in sweetness and in moral height, Nor lose the wrestling thews that throw the world ; She mental breadth, nor fail in childward care, Nor lose the childlike in the larger mind ; Till at the last she set herself to man, Like perfect music...
Página 526 - O May I Join The Choir Invisible! O may I join the choir invisible Of those immortal dead who live again In minds made better by their presence...
Página 531 - REQUIEM UNDER the wide and starry sky, Dig the grave and let me lie. Glad did I live and gladly die, And I laid me down with a will. This be the verse you grave for me: Here he lies where he longed to be ; Home is the sailor, home from sea, And the hunter home from the hill.
Página 414 - These are the heroes that despise the Dutch, And rail at new-come foreigners so much, Forgetting that themselves are all derived From the most scoundrel race that ever lived ; A horrid crowd of rambling thieves and drones, Who ransacked kingdoms and dispeopled towns, The Pict and painted Briton, treacherous Scot, By hunger, theft, and rapine hither brought ; Norwegian pirates, buccaneering Danes, Whose red-haired offspring everywhere remains, Who, joined with Norman-French, compound the breed From...
Página 303 - ... and when that diligent bird has at length taken a fish, and is bearing it to his nest for the support of his mate and young ones, the bald eagle pursues him and takes it from him. With all this injustice he is never in good case, but, like those among men who live by sharping and robbing, he is generally poor, and often very lousy.
Página 470 - Lay her i' the earth : And from her fair and unpolluted flesh May violets spring ! I tell thee churlish priest, A ministering angel shall my sister be, When thou liest howling.
Página 486 - O, what a noble mind is here o'erthrown! The courtier's, soldier's, scholar's, eye, tongue, sword; The expectancy and rose of the fair state, The glass of fashion and the mould of form, The observed of all observers, quite, quite down!
Página 146 - What thou seest, What there thou seest, fair creature, is thyself; With thee it came and goes...
Página 539 - Thou art gone to the grave ; we no longer behold thee. Nor tread the rough paths of the world by thy side ; But the wide arms of mercy are spread to enfold thee, And sinners may hope, since the Saviour hath died.
Página 302 - I wish the bald eagle had not been chosen as the representative of our country : he is a bird of bad moral character; he does not get his living honestly.

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