Poems, Volumen 1

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J. Johnson, 1782 - 359 páginas
 

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Página 170 - He loved the world that hated him : the tear That dropp'd upon his bible was sincere. Assail'd by scandal, and the tongue of strife, His only answer was — a blameless life ; And he that forged, and he that threw the dart, Had each a brother's interest in his heart.
Página 227 - He says but little, and that little said Owes all its weight, like loaded dice, to lead. His wit invites you by his looks to come, But when you knock it never is at home...
Página 71 - Hear the just law — the judgment of the skies! He that hates truth shall be the dupe of lies ; And he that -will be cheated to the last, Delusions strong as hell shall bind him fast.
Página 102 - Since the dear hour, that brought me to thy foot, And cut up all my follies by the root, I never trusted in an arm but thine, Nor hoped but in thy righteousness divine...
Página 218 - Dubius is such a scrupulous good man ! Yes, you may catch him tripping if you can. He would not with a peremptory tone Assert the nose upon his face his own ; With hesitation admirably slow He humbly hopes, presumes, it may be so.
Página 238 - Though blameless, had incurr'd perpetual strife, Whose deeds had left, in spite of hostile arts, A deep memorial graven on their hearts. The recollection, like a vein of ore, The farther traced enrich'd them still the more ; They thought him, and they justly thought him, one Sent to do more than he appear'd to have done, To exalt a people, and to place them high Above all else, and wonder'd he should die.
Página 317 - On the whole it appears, and my argument shows, With a reasoning the court will never condemn, That the spectacles plainly were made for the Nose, And the Nose was as plainly intended for them.
Página 327 - Did you admire my lamp, quoth he, As much as I your minstrelsy, You would abhor to do me wrong As much as I to spoil your song ; For 'twas the selfsame power divine Taught you. to sing, and me to shine ; That you with music, I with light Might beautify and cheer the night.
Página 184 - To associate all the branches of mankind ; And if a boundless plenty be the robe, Trade is the golden girdle of the globe. Wise to promote whatever end he means, God opens fruitful nature's various scenes : Each climate needs what other climes produce, And offers something to the general use ; No land but listens to the common call, And in return receives supply from all.
Página 337 - Above the steeple shines a plate, That turns and turns, to indicate From what point blows the weather. Look up— your brains begin to swim, 'Tis in the clouds— that pleases him, He chooses it the rather.

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