Identifying Relevant Information for Testing Technique Selection: An Instantiated Characterization Schema

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Springer Science & Business Media, 30 abr. 2003 - 280 páginas
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Engineering tasks are supposed to achieve defined goals under certain project constraints. Example goals of software engineering tasks include achieving a certain functionality together with some level of reliability or performance. Example constraints of software engineering tasks include budget and time limitations or experience limitations of the developers at hand. Planning of an engineering project requires the selection of techniques, methods and tools suited to achieve stated goals under given project constraints. This assumes sufficient knowledge regarding the process-product relationships (or effects) of candidate techniques, methods and tools. Planning of software projects suffers greatly from lack of knowledge regarding the process-product relationships of candidate techniques, methods and tools. Especially in the area of testing a project planner is confronted with an abundance of testing techniques, but very little knowledge regarding their effects under varying project conditions. This book offers a novel approach to addressing this problem: First, based on a comprehensive initial characterization scheme (see chapter 7) an overview of existing testing techniques and their effects under varying conditions is provided to guide the selection of testing approaches. Second, the optimisation of this knowledge base is suggested based on experience from experts, real projects and scientific experiments (chapters 8, 9, and 10). This book is of equal interest to practitioners, researchers and students. Practitioners interested in identifying ways to organize their company-specific knowledge about testing could start with the schema provided in this book, and optimise it further by applying similar strategies as offered in chapters 8 and 9.
 

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Índice

INTRODUCTION
1
12 Faults and Failures
2
13 Testing Process
3
2 The Problem of Selecting Testing Techniques
5
3 Getting a Characterisation Schema for Testing Techniques
8
4 Organisation of the Book
10
STATE OF THE PRACTICE
11
2 Testing Area
13
53 Schema Evolution
133
SYNTHESIS OF PERSPECTIVES PROPOSAL OF THE PRELIMINARY SCHEMA
135
3 Synthesis of the Theoretical and Empirical Schemas
137
Attributes of a Schema
138
Equal Attributes of Two Schemas
139
4 Result of Schema Synthesis
141
IMPROVEMENT OF THE SCHEMA EXPERT PEER REVIEW
147
2 Questionnaire for Experts
148

22 Related Work in the Testing Area
16
23 Conclusions on the Testing Area
26
32 Related Work in the Characterisation Area
30
33 Conclusions on the Area of Characterisation
34
4 Conclusions on the State of the Practice
36
RESEARCH GOALS
37
2 ProblemSolving Approach
42
3 Hypotheses
43
31 Working Hypotheses
44
32 Evaluating the Working Hypotheses
45
PROBLEM SOLVING PROCESS
49
2 Objectives of Technological Research
50
3 Applying the Scientific Method to Technological Research
53
4 Expert Peer Review versus Experimental Testing
57
5 The ProblemSolving Process Used in this Book
59
Deductive Theoretical Schema
60
Inductive Empirical Schema
61
Proposal of a Preliminary Schema
62
Expert Peer Review
63
FIRST GENERATIVE ITERATION DEDUCTIVE THEORETICAL SCHEMA
65
3 Stratification of TestingRelated Information
67
4 Testing Process Elements
70
42 Operational Level
71
5 Attributes of the Theoretical Schema
73
52 Tactical Level
85
6 Result of the Construction of the Theoretical Schema
87
Selection
89
Evolution
93
Research
96
SECOND GENERATIVE ITERATION INDUCTIVE EMPIRICAL SCHEMA
97
2 Data Collection
98
22 Survey Coverage
99
23 Form Building
101
3 Data Analysis
102
31 Creation of the Reference Set
103
4 Result of Building the Empirical Schema
113
51 Schema Growth
125
52 Importance of Each Schema Attribute
128
3 Questionnaire Analysis Method
149
4 Analysis of Responses
151
Attributes
153
Elements
158
Levels
159
Other Remarks
160
5 Improved Schema
163
EMPIRICAL EVALUATION
167
2 Choice of the Workload
168
31 Feasibility
169
32 Schema Flexibility
175
EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION
177
2 Experiment Planning
179
21 Parameters
182
22 Factors and Their Alternatives
183
23 Response Variables
185
3 Experimental Design
187
31 TwoFactor Design with Replication
189
32 Experimental Procedure
190
33 Threats to Validity
192
4 Data Analysis
194
41 Characteristics of the Subjects
195
42 Schema Efficiency
196
43 Schema Usability
201
44 Schema Completeness
211
45 Schema Effectiveness
224
46 Schema Satisfaction
232
47 Conclusions on Groups
233
5 Conclusions on Experimental Evaluation
237
6 Characterisation Schema Improvement
238
CONCLUSIONS
241
Forms Used to Obtain the Empirical Schema
245
Questionnaires Used in Expert Peer Review
247
Schema Instantiation
251
Experiment Forms
264
Index
276
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