The Diary and Letters of Frances Burney, Madame D'Arblay, Volumen 1

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Little, Brown, 1880
 

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Página 207 - I do really flatter myself this is the silliest speech I ever made! I am quite provoked with myself for it; but a fear of laughing made me eager to utter anything, and by no means conscious, till I had spoken, of what I was saying. He laughed very heartily himself— well he might— and walked away to enjoy it, crying out: 'Very fair indeed! That's being very fair and honest!' Then, returning to me again, he said: 'But your father— how came you not to show him what you wrote?' 'I was too much...
Página 207 - I was really hardly able to keep my countenance. The What? was then repeated with so earnest a look, that, forced to say something, I stammeringly answered: 'I thought— sir— it would look very well in print!' I do really flatter myself this is the silliest speech I ever made! I am quite provoked with myself for it; but a fear of laughing made me eager to utter anything, and by no means conscious, till I had spoken, of what I was saying. He laughed very heartily himself— well he might— and...
Página 80 - Mr. B. beyond Wednesday, for Mrs. Thrale makes a point of my returning to Streatham on Tuesday, unless, which God forbid, poor Hetty should be worse again. "Adieu, my dear daddy, I won't be mortified, and I won't be downed, — but I will be proud to find I have, out of my own family, as well as in it, a friend who loves me well enough to speak plain truth to me.
Página 223 - Was there ever," cried he, " such stuff as great part of Shakespeare? only one must not say so! But what think you? — What? — Is there not sad stuff? What?— what?" "Yes, indeed, I think so, sir, though mixed with such excellences, that — " " Oh!" cried he, laughing good-humouredly, "I know it is not to be said ! but it's true. Only it's Shakespeare, and nobody dare abuse him.
Página 260 - I stared, and drew back, with a look so undisguised of wonder and displeasure at this extraordinary speech, that I saw it was understood, and she then thought it time, therefore, to name her authority, which with great emphasis, she did thus : " The queen will give you a gown ! The queen says you are not rich,
Página 309 - Princesses, used to it as they are, get regularly knocked up before this business is over, off they drop one by one : — first the Queen deserts us ; then Princess Elizabeth is done for ; then Princess Royal begins coughing ; then Princess Augusta gets the snuffles ; and all the poor attendants, my poor sister* at their head, drop off, one after another, like so many snuffs of candles : till at last, dwindle, dwindle, dwindle — not a soul goes to the Chapel but the King, the parson, and myself;...
Página 258 - ... the parade, and turning from side to side to see everybody as she passed ; for all the terracers stand up against the walls, to make a clear passage for the royal family the moment they come in sight. Then followed the King and Queen, no less delighted with the joy of their little darling.
Página 140 - ... again, excepted in the invitation. He is almost constantly omitted, either from too much respect or too much fear. I am sorry for it, as he hates being alone, and as, though he scolds the others, he is well enough satisfied himself; and, having given vent to all his own occasional anger or ill-humour, he is ready to begin again, and is never aware that those who have so been " downed " by him, never can much covet so triumphant a visitor.
Página 40 - Mrs. Montagu dines here, and then you will have talk enough.' ' Dr. Johnson began to see-saw, with a countenance strongly expressive of inward fun, and after enjoying it some time in silence, he suddenly, and with great animation, turned to me and cried, "Down with her, Burney! — down with her! — spare her not! — attack her, fight her, and down with her at once!
Página 242 - ... between them. The Queen never sends for me till her hair is dressed. This, in a morning, is always done by her wardrobe-woman, Mrs. Thielky, a German, but who speaks English perfectly well. Mrs. Schwellenberg, since the first week, has never come down in a morning at all. The Queen's dress is finished by Mrs. Thielky and myself. No maid ever enters the room while the Queen is in it. Mrs. Thielky hands the things to me, and I put them on.

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