The Bravo: A Tale, Volumen 1

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Página 9 - I STOOD in Venice on the Bridge of Sighs, A palace and a prison on each hand ; I saw from out the wave her structures rise As from the stroke of the enchanter's wand : A thousand years their cloudy wings expand Around me, and a dying Glory smiles O'er the far times, when many a subject land Look'd to the winged Lion's marble piles, Where Venice sate in state, throned on her hundred isles...
Página 102 - ... backward, on occasion, in defending his opinions by analogies drawn from the decrees of Providence. With a philosophy that seemed to satisfy himself, he contended that, as God had established orders throughout his own creation, in a descending chain from angels to men, it was safe to follow an example which emanated from a wisdom that was infinite. Nothing could be more sound than the basis of his theory, though its application had the capital error of believing there was any imitation of nature...
Página 236 - ... of the fisherman with a dignity that his auditor had not been accustomed to find in men of his class. A spirit so long chastened by suffering had become elevated and noble. He related his hopes for the boy, the manner in which they had been blasted by the unjust and selfish policy of the state, of his different efforts to procure the release of his grandson, and his bold expedients at the regatta, and the fancied nuptials with the Adriatic. When he had thus prepared the Carmelite to understand...
Página 103 - ... fisherman of the Lido is the hero. The following sketch will give him identity with the reader. " Of those who were reluctantly compelled to turn their thoughts from the levities of the moment to the cares of the morrow, and were departing in crowds to humble roofs, and hard pillows, there remained one who continued to occupy a spot near the junction of the two squares, as motionless as if his naked feet grew to the stone on which he stood. It was Antonio. " The position of the fisherman brought...
Página 233 - Carmelite. The latter seemed more confounded than his companion, by the rapidity of the movement, and the novelty of his situation. Notwithstanding his confusion, however, an evident look of wonder crossed his mortified features when he first beheld the humble condition, the thin and whitened locks, and the general air and bearing of the old man with whom he now found himself. " Who art thou ?" escaped him, in the impulse of surprise. " Antonio of the Lagunes ! A fisherman that owes much to St. Anthony,...
Página 175 - Most present when least thought of — nothing dropt In secret, when the heart was on the lips, Nothing in feverish sleep, but instantly Observed and judged — a Power, that if but named In casual converse, be it where it might, The speaker lowered at once his eyes, his voice, And pointed upward as to God in Heaven What tho' that Power was there, he who lived thus, Pursuing Pleasure, lived as if it were not.
Página 139 - Venice, with the innumerable angles and the constant passing, have given rise to a fashion of construction and of rowing that are so peculiar to that city and its immediate dependencies, as to require some explanation. The reader has doubtless already understood that a gondola is a long, narrow, and light boat, adapted to the uses of the place, and distinct from the wherries of all other towns. The distance between the dwellings, on most of the canals, is so small, that the width of the latter does...
Página 116 - From his green islet, bringing o'er the waves , His wife and little one ; the husbandman From the firm land, with many a friar and nun, And village-maiden, her first flight from home, Crowding the common ferry.
Página 7 - Were we to characterize a republic, we should say it was a state in which power, both theoretically and practically, is derived from the nation, with a constant responsibility of the agents of the public to the people ; a responsibility that is neither to be evaded nor denied. That such a system is better on a large than on a small scale, though contrary to brilliant theories which have been written to uphold different institutions, must be evident on the smallest reflection, since the danger of...

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