Ædes Hartwellianæ: Or, Notices of the Manor and Mansion of Hartwell

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private circulation, 1851 - 414 páginas
Includes a description of the founding of Hartwell Observatory, which Smyth assisted Dr. John Lee in creating.
 

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Página 156 - And the Egyptians made the children of Israel to serve with rigour. And they made their lives bitter with hard bondage, in mortar, and in brick, and in all manner of service in the field: all their service, wherein they made them serve, was with rigour.
Página 117 - Her finger was so small, the ring Would not stay on which they did bring, It was too wide a peck : And to say truth, for out it must, ' It look'd like the great collar, just, About our young colt's neck. Her feet beneath her petticoat, Like little mice stole in and out, As if they fear'd the light : But oh ! she dances such a way — No sun upon an Easter day Is half so fine a sight.
Página 40 - God Almighty first planted a garden; and, indeed, it is the purest of human pleasures; it is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which buildings and palaces are but gross handyworks...
Página 102 - At Timon's villa let us pass a day; Where all cry out, ' What sums are thrown away!' So proud, so grand; of that stupendous air, Soft and agreeable come never there. Greatness with Timon dwells in such a draught As brings all Brobdignag before your thought. To compass this, his building is a town, His pond an ocean, his parterre a down : Who but must laugh, the master when he sees, A puny insect shivering at a breeze ! Lo, what huge heaps of littleness around!
Página 353 - All Nature is but art, unknown to thee All chance, direction, which thou canst not see; All discord, harmony not understood; All partial evil, universal good: And, spite of pride, in erring reason's spite, One truth is clear, Whatever is, is right.
Página 117 - For he that fights and runs away May live to fight another day, But he that is in battle slain Will never rise to fight again.
Página 220 - My hopes are with the Dead ; anon My place with them will be, And I with them shall travel on Through all Futurity ; Yet leaving here a name, I trust, That will not perish in the dust.
Página 392 - ... Tis not in battles that from youth we train The Governor who must be wise and good, And temper with the sternness of the brain Thoughts motherly, and meek as womanhood. Wisdom doth live with children round her knees : Books, leisure, perfect freedom, and the talk Man holds with week-day man in the hourly walk Of the mind's business : these are the degrees By which true Sway doth mount ; this is the stalk True Power doth grow on ; and her rights are these.
Página 198 - And the waters shall fail from the sea, and the river shall be wasted and dried up. And they shall turn the rivers far away , and the brooks of" defence shall be emptied and dried up : the reeds and flags shall wither. The paper reeds by the brooks, by the mouth of the brooks, and every thing sown by the brooks, shall wither, be driven away, . and be no more.
Página 313 - Under the assumption, therefore, that gravitation governs, and that one of the components revolves, while the other, though not necessarily in the focus, is at rest, the curve is constructed by means of the angles of position and the corresponding times of observation ; and tangents to this curve, at stated intervals, yield the apparent distances at each angle, they being, by the known laws of elliptical motion, equal to the square roots of the apparent angular velocities. Thus armed, Sir John proceeded...

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