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but useful Diligence will at last prevail, and there can never be wanting some who distinguish desert.” Among those who amused themselves and the public on this occasion, Mr. Wilkes, in an Essay printed in the Public Advertiser, ridiculed the following paslage in the Grammar. “ H seldom, perhaps never, begins any but the first fyllable.” The position is undoubtedly expressed with too much latitude ; but Johnson never altered the passage. Dr. Kenrick's threatened attack, feveral years after, in his Review of Johnson's Shakspeare, never saw the light. Campbell's ridicule of his style under the title of “ Lexiphanes,” 1767, and Callender's “ Deformities of Dr. Johnson,” 1782, though laughable, from the application of Johnson's “ words of large meaning” to insignificant matters, are scarcely worthy of notice. His old pupil, Garrick, com

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plimented him on its coming out first, in the following “ Epigram,” alluding to the ill-fuccess of the forty members of the French Academy employed in settling their language.

Talk of war with a Briton, he'll boldly advance
That one English foldier will beat ten of France:
Would we alter the boast, from the sword to the pen,
Our odds are still greater, still greater our men;
In the deep mines of science, though Frenchmen

may toil,
Can their strength be compar'd to Locke, Newton,

and Boyle: Let them rally their heroes, send forth all their powers, Their verse-men, and prose-men; then match them

with ours; First Shakspeare and Milton, like gods in the fight, Have put their whole drama and epic to flight; In satires, epistles, and odes would they cope, Their numbers retreat before Dryden and Pope ; And Johnson, well arm'd like a hero of yore, Has beat forty French, and will beat forty more!

In this year, he afforded his assistance to Mr. Zechariah Williams, father of the blind lady whom he had humanely receiv

ed under his roof, who had quitted his profession in hopes of obtaining the great parliamentary reward for the discovering of the longitude ; and benevolently wrote for him, “ An account of an attempt to ascertain the longitude at sea, by an exact theory of the variation of the magnetical needle; with a table of the variations at the most remarkable cities in Europe, from the year 1660, to 1860, 4to, by Zachariah Williams.” This pamphlet was published in English and Italian, the translation being the work, as is supposed, of Mr. Baretti. Mr. Williams failed of success, and died July 12. 1755, in his 83d year. Johnson placed this pamphlet in the Bodleian library, and for fear of any omiffion or mistake, he entered, in the great catalogue, the title page of it, with his own hand. It appears from his correspondence with Mr. Warton, that he “ intended, in the winter 1755, to open a Biblio[ 1 plimented him on its coming out first, in the following “ Epigram,” alluding to the ill-fuccess of the forty members of the French Academy employed in settling their language.

Talk of war with a Briton, he'll boldly advance
That one English soldier will beat ten of France:
Would we alter the boast, from the sword to the pen,
Our odds are still greater, still greater our men;
In the deep mines of science, though Frenchmen

may toil,
Can their strength be compar'd to Locke, Newton,

and Boyle: Let them rally their heroes, send forth all their powers, Their verse-men, and profe-men; then match them with ours;

. Frst Shakspeare and Milton, like gods in the fight, Have put their whole drama and epic to flight; In satires, epistles, and odes would they cope, Their numbers retreat before Dryden and Pope; . And Johnson, well arm'd like a hero of yore, Has beat forty French, and will beat forty more!

In this year, he afforded his assistance to Mr. Zechariah Williams, father of the blind lady whom he had humanely receiv

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whom I should have received the neceffary help, in this case, is not at home, and I am afraid of not finding Mr. Millar. If you could be so good as to send me this sum, I will very gratefully repay you, and add it to all former obligations.” In the margin of this letter, there is a memorandum in these words :—“ March 16. 1756. Sent fix guineas. Witness William Richardfon.”

“For the honour of an admired writer," fays Mr. Murphy, “ it is to be regretted that we do not find a more liberal entry.". This anecdote may appear to support the parsimony of the author, whose hero gives most profusely; but something may still be said in favour of Richardson. All that Johnson asked was a temporary supply; and that was granted. There was certainly no ostentatious liberality; but a kind action seems to have been done, without delay, and without grudging.

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