Memoirs of a Captivity in Japan, During the Years 1811, 1812, and 1813: With Observations on the Country and the People, Volumen 2

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H. Colburn and Company, 1824
 

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Página 268 - She was extremely desirous of seeing our ship, and the strange people and polite enemies, as she styled us, and to witness our friendly intercourse with her countrymen. A Japanese lady was also, to us, no slight object of curiosity. When she came on board she appeared very timid and embarrassed. I requested TachatayKachi to conduct her into my cabin, and as she advanced I took her by the other hand. On reaching the cabin-door she wished to take off her straw shoes ; but as there were neither mats...
Página 172 - Our countrymen wish to carry on no commerce with foreign lands, for we know no want of necessary things. Though foreigners are permitted to trade to Nagasaki, even to that harbor only those are admitted with whom we have for a long period maintained relations, and we do not trade with them for the sake of gain, but for other important objects.
Página 171 - This year it has not been enforced, because we wished to communicate with your countrymen; but all that may henceforth present themselves will be driven back by cannon-balls. Bear in mind this declaration, and...
Página 206 - The joy of the Japanese was, indeed, unfeigned. We understood from the interpreters, that in consequence of an application from the High Priest of the city, the Bunyo had issued orders that prayers for our safe voyage should be offered up in all the temples for the space of five days.
Página 13 - I had rested my foot detached itself, and rolled to the bottom of a deep hollow which the rock overhung : I was thus left hanging by one hand, without the possibility of obtaining any other support, owing to the excessive smoothness of the rock. The rest of the sailors were at no great distance, but fatigue rendered them unable to afford me any assistance. Makaroff still lay stretched upon the ground, and Mr.
Página 265 - I informed him, that he must hold himself in readiness to accompany me to Russia, and explained the circumstances which compelled me to make such an arrangement. He understood me perfectly well ; and when I proceeded to state my belief that Captain Golownin, Mr. Moor, and the rest of the Russian prisoners, had been put to death, he suddenly interrupted me, exclaiming, " That is not true. Captain Moor and five Russians are living in Matsmai, where they are well treated, and enjoy the freedom of walking...
Página 286 - I had taken of him at sea and on land. He then sunk into a deep silence and prayed. Hereupon, he delivered to the sailor •whom he most esteemed his picture, to be conveyed to his wife ; and his large sabre, which he called his paternal sword, to be presented to his only son and heir. After the whole of this solemn ceremony was...
Página 207 - Several boxes, containinglackered vessels, were afterwards brought in, as presents from the interpreters, in return for the books which, with the consent of the government, they had received from us ; but they had been ordered to accept of nothing more. We were, however, very well assured that these presents were sent to us at the expense of the government. On the following day, the 7th of October, we put on our best clothes. The servants and guards packed up our other clothes in boxes, without omitting...
Página 204 - s misconduct had been the occasion of our imprisonment ; but that, as the bunyo was convinced that the said Chwostoff had acted without the sanction of the Russian Government, he was authorized to grant us our liberty, and that we should embark on the following day. The interpreters having translated this paper, and assured the bunyo that we understood it, one of the senior officers was dispatched in company with Kumaddschero to communicate its contents to the sailors. In the meanwhile the bunyo...
Página 286 - Japanese custom, with his legs crossed under him, he rose up, and addressed me very earnestly in the following terms : " Thou knowest enough of Japanese to understand all that I may say, in plain and simple words, to my sailors. I would not wish that thou shouldst have any ground to suspect me of hatching base designs." He then sat down again, when his sailors approached him on their knees, and, hanging down their heads, listened with deep attention to his words. He then reminded them, circumstantially,...

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