The Life of a Boy, Volumen 2

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G. and W.B. Whittaker, 1821
 

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Página 31 - All places that the eye of heaven visits Are to a wise man ports and happy havens. Teach thy necessity to reason thus ; There is no virtue like necessity.
Página 315 - ... not cast them off: Oh, if it could be so, It were indeed a dreadful thing to die ! Not to the grave, not to the grave, my Soul, Follow thy friend beloved ; But in the lonely hour, But in the evening walk, Think that he companies thy solitude ; Think that he holds with thee Mysterious intercourse ; And, though remembrance wake a tear, There will be joy in grief.
Página 71 - His career of services had been long, but it was only in the last war that he burst upon the eye of the public as a luminary of the first magnitude. At the battle of Aboukir, he rose like the sun in the east, and like the sun too, after a summer's day of glory, he set in the west, at the battle of Trafalgar, leaving the ocean in a blaze as he went down, and in darkness when he descended. "In ages to come, when the stranger who visits our island shall inquire for the monument of Nelson, the answer...
Página 425 - I could not confide in her ; well informed, or she could not educate my children ; •well-bred, or she could not entertain my friends ; consistent, or I should offend the shade of my mother ; pious, or I should not be happy with her, because the prime comfort in a companion for life is the delightful hope that she will be a companion for eternity.
Página 139 - Thou art clothed with honor and majesty ; who coverest thyself with light as with a garment ; who stretchest out the heavens like a curtain : who layeth the beams of His chambers in the waters ; who maketh the clouds His chariot ; who walketh upon the wings of the wind ; who laid the foundations of the earth, that it should not be removed for ever." II. " EXPULSIVE OROTUND." This form of the
Página 111 - She once was young though now advanced in years. Viet. No, I deserve it all ; she is most worthy. Unlike those faded beauties of the court, But now the wither'd stems of former flowers, With all their blossoms shed, her nobler mind Procures to her the privilege of man, Ne'er to be old till nature's strength decays.
Página 123 - ... of learning. Nor have we any reason for despondency. There is that in American character, which has never yet been found unequal to its purpose. There is that in American enterprise, which shrinks not, and faints not, and fails not in its labors. We may say with honest pride, " Man is the nobler growth our realms supply, And souls are ripen'd in our Northern sky.
Página 71 - Bonaparte,the nobleand lamentedlordNeIson,once more, and for the last time, fought and conquered the united foes of his country; but he fell in the meridian of victory, and in one moment became immortal in both worlds. His career of services had been long, but it was only in the last war that he burst upon the eye of the public as a luminary of the first magnitude. At the battle of Aboukir, he rose like the sun in the east, and like the sun too, after...
Página 388 - ... and thy song is lovely ! It is lovely, O Malvina! but it melts the soul. There is a joy in grief when peace dwells in the breast of the sad.
Página 53 - Philip greets Aristotle. Know that a son is born to me. I thank the gods, not so much that he is born, as that it is his good fortune to be born in your lifetime. I hope that as a result of your training he will prove worthy of us and of succeeding to so great a kingdom. For I think it is better to lack children than to have begotten them for the dishonour of their ancestors.

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