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Indian village as near at hand. flanking towers of the same material. Skulking, therefore, by day in cañions The entrance is by a large gateway and deep gorges of the mountains, into the square, round which are the and travelling by night, he followed rooms occupied by the traders and closely on the trail of the victorious employés of the host. These are savages, bided his time, struck his small in size, with walls coloured "coup," and recovered a pair of pack by a white-wash made of clay found horses, which was all he required. in the prairie. Their flåt roofs are Ever since, he had been trapping alone defended along the exterior by parain all parts of the mountains ; had pets of adobe, to serve as a cover to visited the rendezvous but twice for marksmen firing from the top; and short periods, and then with full along the coping grow plants of packs of beayer; and was now on his cactus of all the varieties common in way to Bent's Fort, to dispose of his the plains. In the centre of the present loads of peltry, enjoy one square is the press for packing the good carouse on Taos whisky, and furs; and there are three large rooms, then return to some hole or corner in one used as a store and magazine, the mountains which he knew of, to .another as a council-room, where the follow in the spring his solitary avo- Indians assemble for their "talks," cation. He too had had his share of whilst the third is the common dintroubles, and had many Indian scrapes, ing-hall, where the traders, trappers, but passed safely through all, and and hunters, and all employés, feast scarcely cared to talk of what he had upon the best provender the gamedone, so matter-of-fact to him were covered country affords. Over the the most extraordinary of his perilous culinary department presided of late adventures.

years a fair lady of colour, Charlotte Arrived at Bent's Fort, the party by name, who was, as she loved to disposed of their cavallada, and say, “ de onlee lady in de dam Injun then - respect for the pardonable country," and who moreover was weaknesses of our mountain friends celebrated from Long's Peak to the prompts us to draw a veil over the Cumbres Espanolás for slap-jacks and furious orgies that ensued. A num- pumpkin pies. ber of hunters and trappers were Here congregate at certain seasons "in" from their hunting grounds, the merchants of the plains and mounand a village of Shians and some tains, with their stocks of peltry. lodges of Kioways were camped round Chiefs of the Shian, the Kioway, and the fort. As long as the liquor lasted, Arapahó, sit in solemn conclave with and there was good store of alcohol the head traders, and smoke the as well as of Taos whisky, the "calumet" over their real and imaArkansa resounded with furious ginary grievances. Now 0-cun-nomirth -not unmixed with graver whurst, the Yellow Wolf, grand chief scenes ; for your mountaineer, ever of the Shian, complains of certain quarrelsome in his cups, is quick to grave offences against the dignity of give and take offence, when rifles his nation! A trader from the “big alone can settle the difference, and lodge” (the fort) has been in his much blood is spilt upon the prairie village, and before the trade was in his wild and frequent quarrels. opened, in laying the customary

Bent's Fort is situated on the left chief's gift " on the prairie"'* has not or northern bank of the river Ar- "opened his hand,” but “squeezed kansa, about one hundred miles from out his present between his fingers" the foot of the Rocky Mountains on grudgingly_and with too sparing a low and level bluff of the prairie measure. This was hard to bear, but which here slopes gradually to the the Yellow Wolf would say no more! water's-edge. The walls are built Tah-kai-buhl or, “he who jumps," entirely of adobes-or sun-burned is deputed from the Kioway to warn bricks in the form of a hollow square, the white traders not to proceed at two corners of which are circular to the Canadian to trade with the

* Indian expression for a free gift.

Comanche. That nation is mad- and far out of reach of intercourse a “heap mad" with the whites, and with civilised man; its mud-built has " dug up the hatchet" to "rub walls inclosing a little garrison of a out" all who enter its country. The dozen hardy men, sufficient to hold Kioway loves the paleface, and gives in check the numerous tribes of sahim warning, (and " he who jumps" vages ever thirsting for their blood. looks as if he deserves something Yet the solitary stranger passing this "on the prairie" for his information.) lone fort, feels proudly secure when

Shawh-noh-qua-mish, “the peeled he comes within sight of the " stars lodge-pole," is there to excuse his and stripes" which float above the Arapahó braves, who lately made walls. free with a band of horses belonging Again we must take a jump with to the fort. He promises the like La Bonté over a space of several shall never happen again, and he, months; when we find him, in comShawh-noh-qua-mish, speaks with a pany of half a dozen trappers, amongst "single tongue.” Over clouds of them his inseparable compañero Killtobacco and kinnik-kinnik, these buck, camped on the Greenhorn creek, grave affairs are settled and terms en route to the settlements of New arranged.

Mexico. They have a few mules In the corral, groups of leather- packed with beaver for the Taos clad mountaineers, with “decks" of market; but this expedition has been “euker” and “ seven up," gamble planned more for pleasure than proaway their hard-earned peltries. The fit-a journey to Taos valley being employés-mostly St Louis French- the only civilised relaxation coveted men and Canadian voyageurs—are by the mountaineers. Not a few of pressing packs of buffalo skins, beat- the present band are bound thither ing robes, or engaged in other duties with matrimonial intentions; the belles of a trading fort. Indian squaws, of Nuevo Mejico being to them the the wives of mountaineers, strut about ne plus ultra of female perfection, in all the pride of beads and fanfa- uniting most conspicuous personal ron, jingling with bells and bugles, charms (although coated with cosmetic and happy as paint can make them. alegria-an herb, with the juice of Hunters drop in with animals packed which the women of Mexico hideously with deer or buffalo meat to supply bedaub their faces) with all the hardthe fort ; Indian dogs look anxi- working industry of Indian squaws, ously in at the gateway, fearing to The ladies, on their part, do not enter and encounter the enmity of hesitate to leave the paternal abodes, their natural enemies, the whites: and eternal tortilla-making, to share and outside the fort, at any hour of the perils and privations of the the day or night, one may safely wager American mountaineers in the disto see a dozen coyotes or prairie tant wilderness. Utterly despising wolves loping round, or seated on their their own countrymen, whom they are haunches, and looking gravelyon, used to contrast with the dashing waiting patiently for some chance white hunters who swagger in all the offal to be cast outside. Against pride of fringe and leather through the walls, groups of Indians, too their towns--they, as is but natural, proud to enter without an invitation, gladly accept husbands from the latter lean, wrapped in their buffalo robes, class; preferring the stranger, who sulky and evidently ill at ease to be possesses the heart and strong right so near the whites without a chance arm to defend them, to the miserable, of fingering their scalp-locks; their cowardly " pelados," who hold what white lodges shining in the sun, little they have on sufferance of savage at a little distance from the river- Indians, but one degree superior to banks; their horses feeding in the themselves. plain beyond.

Certainly no band of hunters that The appearance of the fort is very ever appeared in the vale of Taos, striking, standing as it does hundreds numbered in its ranks a properer lot of miles from any settlement, on of lads than those now camped on the vast and lifeless prairie, sur- Greenhorn, intent on matrimonial rounded by hordes of hostile Indians, foray into the settlements of New

Mexico. There was young Dick on his clean-shaven face. No name, Wooton, who was “ some" for his however, was better known in the inches, being six feet six, and as mountains — from Yellow Stone to straight and strong as the barrel of his Spanish Peaks, from Missouri to long rifle. Shoulder to shoulder with Columbia River,-than that of Kit this boy," stood Rube Herring, and Carson, "raised" in Boonlick, county not a hair's-breadth difference in height of Missouri State, and a credit to the or size between them. Killbuck, though diggins that gave him birth. mountain winters had sprinkled a few On Huerfano or Orphan Creek, snow-flakes on his head, looked up to so called from an isolated hutte which neither; and La Bonté held his own stands on a prairie near the stream, with any mountaineer who ever set a our party fell in with a village of trap in sight of Long's Peak or the Yutah Indians, at that time hostile to Snowy Range. Marcelline-who, the whites. Both parties were prethough a Mexican, despised his peo- paring for battle, when Killback, who ple and abjured his blood, having spoke the language, went forward been all his life in the mountains with with signs of peace, and after a talk the white hunters-looked down easily with several chiefs, entered into an upon six feet and odd inches. In armistice, each party agreeing not to form a Hercules, he had the sym - molest the other. After trading for metry of an Apollo; with strikingly a few deer-skins which the Yutahs are handsome features, and masses of long celebrated for dressing delicately fine, black hair hanging from his slouching the trappers moved hastily on out of beaver over the shoulders of his buck- such dangerous company, and camped skin hunting shirt. He, as he was wont under the mountain on Oak Creek, to say, was “no dam Spaniard, but where they forted in a strong position, * mountainee man,' wagh!" Chabo- and constructed a corral in which to nard, a half-breed, was not lost in the secure their animals at night. At crowd ;-and, the last in height, but the this point is a tolerable pass through first in every quality which constitutes the mountains, where a break occurs excellence in a mountaineer, whether in the range, whence they graof indomitable courage, or perfect in- dually decrease in magnitude until difference to death or danger; with they meet the sierras of Mexico, an iron frame capable of withstand which connect the two mighty chains of ing hunger, thirst, heat, cold, fatigue the Andes and the Rocky Mountains. and hardships of every kind; of won. From the summit of the dividing ridge, derful presence of mind, and endless to the eastward, a view is had of the resource in time of great peril; with vast sea of prairie which stretches the instinct of an animal, and the away from the base of the mountains, moral courage of a man who was in dreary barrenness, for nearly a "taller" for his inches than Kit thousand miles, until it meets the CARSON, paragon of mountaineers ? * fertile valley of the great Missouri. Small in stature, and slenderly Over this boundless expanse, nothing limbed, but with muscles of wire, with breaks the uninterrupted solitude of the a fair complexion and quiet intel- view. Not a tree or atom of foliage ligent features, to look at Kit none relieves the eye; for the lines of would suppose that the mild-looking scattered timber which belt the being before him was an incarnate streams running from the mountains, devil in Indian fight, and had raised are lost in the shadow of their stumore hair from head of Redskins pendous height, and beyond this nothan any two men in the western thing is seen but the bare surface of country; and yet, thirty winters had the rolling prairie. In no other part scarcely planted a line or furrow of the chain are the grand character

* Since the time of which we speak, Kit Carson has distinguished himself in guiding the several U. S. exploring expeditions, under Frémont, across the Rocky Mountains, and to all parts of Oregon and California ; and for his services, the President of the United States presented the gallant mountaineer with the commission of lieutenant in a newly raised regiment of mounted riflemen, of which his old leader Frémont is appointed colonel.

istics of the Far West more strikingly with cigarito, which was at intervals displayed than from this pass. The removed to allow utterance to the mountains here rise, on the eastern salutation to each hunter as he trotted side, abruptly from the plain, and the past of Adios, Americanos,-"Welview over the great prairies is not come to Fernandez !" and then they therefore obstructed by intervening hurried off to prepare for the fanridges. To the westward the eye dango, which invariably followed the sweeps over the broken spurs which advent of the mountaineers. The stretch from the main range in every men, however, seemed scarcely so direction; whilst distant peaks, for well pleased ; but leaned sulkingly the most part snow-covered, are seen against the walls, their sarapes turnat intervals rising isolated above the ed over the left shoulder, and conrange. On all sides the scene is wild cealing the lower part of the face, the and dismal.

hand appearing from its upper folds Crossing by this pass, the trappers only to remove the eternal cigarro followed the Yutah trail over a plain, from their lips. They, from under their skirting a pine-covered ridge, in which broad - brimmed sombreros, scowled countless herds of antelope, tame as with little affection upon the stalwart sheep, were pasturing. Numerous hunters, who clattered past them, creeks intersect it, well timbered with scarcely deigning to glance at the oak, pine, and cedar, and well stocked sullen Peládos, but paying incomprewith game of all kinds. On the hensible compliments to the buxom eleventh day from leaving the Huer wenches who smiled at them from the fano, they struck the Taos valley doors. Thus exchanging salutations, settlement on Arroyo Hondo, and they rode up to the house of an pushed on at once to the village of old mountaineer, who had long been Fernandez--sometimes, but impro- settled here with a New Mexican perly, called Taos. As the dashing wife, and who was the recognised enband clattered through the village, tertainer of the hunters when they the dark eyes of the reboso-wrapped visited Taos valley, receiving in exmuchachas peered from the doors of change such peltry as they brought the adobe houses, each mouth armed with them.

A LEGEND FROM ANTWERP.

I SCARCELY know why, upon my theatre; a plump, taciturn, respectlast passage through Antwerp, I took able-looking man, in blue spectacles up my quarters at the Park Hotel, and a loose coat, whom I had difficulty instead of alighting, according to my in recognising that evening when I previous custom, at the sign of the saw him trip the boards in the chablessed Saint Anthony. The change racter of the gay Count Almaviva. was perhaps owing to my hackney Next to the man of notes sat a thin, coachman, who, seeing me fagged and sunburned, middle-aged German, who bewildered by a weary jolting on the informed us, in the course of converworst of European railroads, affected sation, that after spending twenty to mistake my directions-a misunder- years on a cochineal farm in Mexico, standing that possibly resulted from he was on his way back to his native his good understanding with mine land, to pass the latter portion of his host of the “Park.” Be that as it life in the tranquil enjoyment of pipe, may, my baggage, before I could say beer, and competency, in the shadow nay, was in tho embraces of a cloud of his village steeple, and possiblyof waiters, who forthwith disap- although of this he said nothing in peared in the recesses of the inn, the peaceful companionship of a placid, whither I was fain to follow. It was stocking-knitting, child-bearing Frau. a bright May day, and I felt no way There was another German at table, dissatisfied with the change of hostelry a coarse, big-headed baron from Swawhen, on looking from the window of bia, who ate like a pig, used his fork my exquisitely clean Flemish bed- as a toothpick, and indulged, to a room, I saw the cheerful boulevard most disgusting extent, in the baronial crowded with comely damsels and and peculiarly Teutonic amusement uniformed idlers, and the spring foli- of hawking. These persons were all age of the lime-trees fluttering freshly foreigners; but the remainder of the in the sunshine. And having picked party, myself excepted, consisted of up the commencement of a furious natives, belonging to the better class appetite during my rickety ride from of Antwerp burghers. With one of Herbesthal, I replied by a particularly these, next to whom I sat, I got into willing affirmative to the inquiry of a conversation; and finding him courspruce waiter, whether Monsieur would teous, intelligent, and good-humoured, be pleased to dine at the table-d'hôte, I was glad to detain him after dinner at the early hour of three o'clock. over the best bottle of Bordeaux the

The excellent dinner of the Park "Park" cellars could produce. This Hotel was served up that day to un- opened his heart, and he volunteered usually few guests; so at least it to act as my cicerone through Antappeared to one accustomed to the werp. Although I had seen, upon numerous daily congregations at the former visits, all the “ lions” of the public tables of France and Germany place, it had been under the guidance Twelve persons surrounded the board, of those odious animals called valetsor, I should rather say, took post in de-place; and I now gladly availed two opposite rows at one extremity myself of my new friend's Offer, and of the long dresser-like table, whose walked out to the citadel. He had capacity of accommodating six times lived in Antwerp all his life ; consethe number was tacit evidence that quently had been there during the the inn was not wont to reckon its siege, in reminiscences of whose incidiners by the single dozen. Of these dents and episodes he abounded-s0 twelve guests, three or four were of much so, that the invalid soldier who the class commis - voyageur Anglicé, exhibits the fortress was kind enough to bagmen-whose talk, being as usual spare us his monotonous elucidations, confined to the rail and the road, their and, whilst opening gates, to keep his grisettes and their samples, I did my mouth closed. I lingered willingly on best not to hear. There was a French the scene of that unjust aggression and singer, then starring at the Antwerp gallant defence, and saw every thing

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