Village London: The Story of Greater London, Volumen 1

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Alderman Press, 1884
Originally published in 1883 under the title Greater London, and first reprinted 100 years later, this work by a Victorian historian and antiquarian records the history of the hamlets, villages and market towns that made up the metropolitan area before the urban sprawl took over.

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Página 149 - O, father abbot, An old man, broken with the storms of state, Is come to lay his weary bones among ye ; Give him a little earth for charity...
Página 524 - ... midst and heat of the battle, to live or die amongst you all, to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and for my people, my honour and my blood, even in the dust. I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman...
Página 103 - Dryden knew more of man in his general nature, and Pope in his local manners. The notions of Dryden were formed by comprehensive speculation ; those of Pope by minute attention. There is more dignity in the knowledge of Dryden, and more certainty in that of Pope.
Página 292 - Light quirks of music, broken and uneven, Make the soul dance upon a jig to heaven. On painted ceilings you devoutly stare, Where sprawl the saints of Verrio or Laguerre, On gilded clouds in fair expansion lie, And bring all paradise before your eye.
Página 184 - Oriel, in which it was predicted that, if Mr. Arnold were elected to the head-mastership of Rugby, he would change the face of education all through the public schools of England.
Página 563 - Twas a handsome milk-maid that had not yet attained so much age and wisdom as to load her mind with any fears of many things that will never be, as too many men too often do; but she cast away all care and sung like a nightingale. Her voice was good, and the ditty fitted for it: it was that smooth song which was made by Kit Marlow now at least fifty years ago.
Página 276 - Mickle, the translator of the Lusiad, and I, went to visit him at this place a few days afterwards. He was not at home ; but having a curiosity to see his apartment, we went in, and found curious scraps of descriptions of animals, scrawled upon the wall with a black lead pencil.
Página 293 - But the contest without a piano was like the play of Hamlet with the part of Hamlet left out.
Página 293 - Another age shall see the golden ear Imbrown the slope, and nod on the parterre, Deep harvests bury all his pride has plann'd, And laughing Ceres reassume the land.
Página 263 - ... my poor father was as diligent to teach me to shoot, as to learn me any other thing, and so I think other men did their children : he taught me how to draw, how to lay my body in my bow, and not to draw with strength of arms as divers other nations do, but with strength of the body.

Referencias a este libro

The Genus Lavandula
Tim Upson,Susyn Andrews,Georita Harriott
No hay ninguna vista previa disponible - 2004

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