Narrative of an Ascent to the Summit of Mont Blanc: On the Eighth and Ninth of August, 1827

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1830 - 148 páginas
 

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Página 109 - Now, where the quick Rhone thus hath cleft his way, The mightiest of the storms hath ta'en his stand : For here, not one, but many, make their play, And fling their thunderbolts from hand to hand, Flashing and cast around : of all the band, The brightest through these parted hills hath fork'd His lightnings — as if he did understand That in such gaps as desolation work'd, There the hot shaft should blast whatever therein lurk'd.
Página 14 - Appear like mice; and yon' tall anchoring bark, Diminish'd to her cock; her cock, a buoy Almost too small for sight: The murmuring surge, That on the unnumber'd idle pebbles chafes, Cannot be heard so high: — I'll look no more; Lest my brain turn, and the deficient sight Topple down headlong.
Página 106 - The sky is changed! - and such a change! Oh night, And storm, and darkness, ye are wondrous strong, Yet lovely in your strength, as is the light Of a dark eye in woman! Far along, From peak to peak, the rattling crags among Leaps the live thunder! Not from one lone cloud, But every mountain now hath found a tongue, And Jura answers, through her misty shroud, Back to the joyous Alps, who call to her aloud!
Página 69 - The most peculiar sensation, which all have felt who have gained this great height, arises from the awful stillness which reigns, almost unbroken even by the voice of those speaking to one another; for its feeble sound can hardly be heard. It weighs deeply upon the mind, with a power the effect of which it is impossible to describe. I also experienced the sensation of lightness of body, of which Capt.
Página 23 - ... cut out by the hatchet; and we passed over these bridges, often grasping the ice with one hand, while the other, bearing the pole, balanced the body, hanging over some abyss, into which the eye penetrated, and searched in vain for the extremity. Sometimes we were obliged to climb up from one crag of ice...
Página 85 - ... swallowed a mouthful of sulphuric acid, which he had bought at Chamounix by mistake for acetic acid, which on these excursions the guides ordinarily drink diluted with water. He suffered acutely for some minutes, until Dr. Hamel thought of making him swallow a quantity of wood-ashes and water, which were fortunately at hand. The alkali neutralized the acid, and he was soon in a condition to enter into the railleries of his companions, who, on his informing them in answer to their numerous...
Página 86 - I heard a sort of rushing sound, not very loud, but I had no time to think about it ; for as I heard the sound, at the same instant the avalanche was upon us. I felt my feet slide from beneath me, and saw the three first men fallen upon the>snow with their feet foremost. In falling, I cried out loudly,
Página 24 - ... the hatchet; and we passed over these bridges, often grasping the ice with one hand, while the other, bearing the pole, balanced the body, hanging over some abyss, into which the eye penetrated, and searched in vain for the extremity. Sometimes we were obliged to climb up from one crag of ice to another, sometimes to scramble along a ledge on our hands and knees, often descending into a deep chasm on the one side, and scaling the slippery precipice on the other.
Página 30 - I could not prevent myself from slipping; as the space became wider I became less cautious, and while looking over the edge into the upper crevice, my feet slid from under me; I came down on my face, and glided rapidly towards the lower one ; I cried out, but the guides who held the ropes attached to me did not stop me, though they stood firm. I had got to the extent of the rope, my feet hanging over the lower crevice, one hand grasping firmly the pole, and the other my hat.
Página 58 - Rochers," or the. highest visible rocks, are merely a small cluster of granite pinnacles, projecting about twenty feet out of the snowy mantle which envelopes the summit and clothes the sides of the mountain. On reaching these rocks, I was so much exhausted that I wished to sleep, but the experienced guides would not permit it, though...

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